Networking two computers

KurtCDavidson

Junior Member
Jun 23, 2001
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Is any special hardware or software required to hook two computers up to each other using a pair of ethernet cards? My brothers and I are hooking are machines up to play counterstrike, though I'd check in advance.
 

Hender

Senior member
Aug 10, 2000
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To hook up two computers straight to each other, you need a special kind of cable called a crossover cable. It differs from regular cat5 ethernet cable, and you'll probably have to ask for it at you local computer place. The easiest and most efficient way in the long run is to simply have a hub or switch that you both plug regular cat5 cables into, because thay way more than 2 computers can be on the network at a time. Don't say that it'll never happen, because when I first got into networking computers years ago, I bought 4-port hub thinking I'd never need more than that, and now I have 4 computers and a router/firewall all going into the same hub, so needless to say I replaced that some time ago.

Anyway, crossover cable straight from machine to machine if this is a one-time thing, but both computers plugging into a hub with regular cat5 is pretty cheap depending on the hub you get, and regular cat5 cable is cheaper and easier to find.
 

KurtCDavidson

Junior Member
Jun 23, 2001
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So something like this would work:
ETHERFAST 5PORT 10/100 AUTO-SENSING HUB W/5 RJ45 PORTS?
I just want to make sure I buy the right thing heheheh.

 

Hender

Senior member
Aug 10, 2000
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That would work just fine, actually. Many companies sell a network starter kit that includes two cards and a hub for a lower price than if you purchased them separately, but it sounds like you already have the cards, so just the hub will do.
 

ChrichtonsGirl

Platinum Member
Aug 24, 2000
2,454
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Mind if I jump in and ask a question? I've got two computers that I'm going to attempt to network tomorrow and I was wondering the same thing as Kurt.

The computer I'm using now has an Ethernet card, but the one I'm networking to doesn't. So I need to buy a hub and another Ethernet card? As usual, @home was no help whatsoever telling me what I'd need to do this. I know how to configure it once I get it set up, but I've never actually set one up before.

 

konichiwa

Lifer
Oct 9, 1999
15,077
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Let me make a recommendation to anyone who will be using their small home network for sharing a high speed internet connection (such as cable or xDSL).

Mosey on over to the Hot Deals forum and pick yourself up a NetGear RT314 4-port Gateway Router for $50 at BestBuy. Not only will this set up much easier than a software NAT solution (such as ICS), it will also make the "client" computer not dependent on the "server" computer (unlike in a NAT/Proxy/ICS setup).

...not to mention the fact that you'll only need 1 NIC in the "server" computer.
 

Hender

Senior member
Aug 10, 2000
647
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You've got it, just a card and a hub. As I said to Kurt, though, make sure if you get a hub that you get regular cat5 (category 5) cable. It's easier to find than crossover cables, but mistakes HAVE been made (er, particularly by those of us that keep all our cables in a big plastic box and don't label anything....). :)
 

ChrichtonsGirl

Platinum Member
Aug 24, 2000
2,454
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Thanks for the suggestions, Chad and Hender! I'll readily admit I'm a beginner at this and I'm trying to do it the simplest way possible (and the cheapest, since @home reams me every month and charges $56 for my cable connection plus another $40 for television).



 

Hender

Senior member
Aug 10, 2000
647
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konichiwa:

You still need a NIC in every computer, or do you mean you only need 1 NIC in the server computer as opposed to 2?

They're just asking about basic home networking, but yes I agree. If any of you want to share a cable or DSL Internet connection, a broadband router is the way to go. I have a Linksys model and my Dad has a D-Link, and both of them are pretty slick in what they can do. You don't have to pay for multiple computers to access your broadband connection, just plug them in and go (after a short set-up, of course).
 

konichiwa

Lifer
Oct 9, 1999
15,077
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<< You still need a NIC in every computer, or do you mean you only need 1 NIC in the server computer as opposed to 2? >>

I mean that if you're using ICS you almost always need 2 NICs in the &quot;server&quot; computer.
 

Hender

Senior member
Aug 10, 2000
647
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For best results, yes, but you can do it with just one. I've set up proxy servers with just one NIC before, but corporate proxies that support a lot of traffic almost always have 2 NICs.
 

odog

Diamond Member
Oct 9, 1999
4,059
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great site for networking


for a short term setup a crossover cable can't be beat for simplicity...($10-15 without the nics)

for a little more cash you can get a hub, that gets you expandability, and versatility.(get a kit if you go this route, it's only a few bucks more and you usually get 2 nics and the hub)($50 for two 100mbit nics and a 10mbit hub, or ~$70 for two 100mbit nics and a 100mbit hub)

for even more cash you can get a broadband router, which is by far the easiet to setup, just turn on DHCP and go:) that way you get the versatility, and expandability on the hub but the future proofing on broadband readiness:)($50-100 for a few different brands without the nics)
 

Hender

Senior member
Aug 10, 2000
647
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<< for a short term setup a crossover cable can't be beat for simplicity...($10-15 without the nics)

<<

Well, you still need NICs, even with a crossover cable. Or are you just quoting the price of the cable?