Need to Access Files

Discussion in '*nix Software' started by zubbs1, Apr 9, 2012.

  1. zubbs1

    zubbs1 Member

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    The Story:
    I had a 1TB iomega home network drive (Drive A) and then added on an iomega 2TB external hard drive (Drive B) connected to the home network drive via USB 3.0. As I learned was common, the home network drive is lost to my home network (hard drive is fine just crappy hardware). Both drives use a linux file system, not a NTFS.

    On my laptop I installed Ubuntu and was able to get drive B connected and I can move files over my home network. I have no way though to view drive A on the laptop.

    In a few days, I am building a new desktop. I'll have a 64GB ssd for Win7 and a 1TB hard drive(drive C) for data. I disassembled the home network drive enclosure and plan to install drive A into the desktop, but I have some data on it I want to save before I format it into NTFS.

    The Question:
    If I install ubuntu onto drive C, how can I get ubuntu to see drive A and copy files to drive C?
     
  2. zubbs1

    zubbs1 Member

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    Edit to add:

    I am not married to ubuntu. If PCBSD would be a viable option, I would go for it. I'm fairly certain I will be using it in the future (once hard drive prices drop back to pre flood realm) for a RAIDZ array anyway.
     
  3. lxskllr

    lxskllr Lifer

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    Instead of installing Ubuntu, use a live CD/USB to transfer the files. That'll free up a drive you can back the files up to.
     
  4. mv2devnull

    mv2devnull Senior member

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    Add to that that live CD/USB tend to enumerate drive volumes and allow easy mount of each of them.

    "Mount" means same as to take a filesystem into use. In *nix there are no separate "drives" like in MS, but a single directory tree and its subtrees can be on different filesystems. Filesystem means files and metadata in one volume/partition/etc. The type (aka format) of filesystem can be ext[234], vfat, xfs, zfs, ntfs, etc.
     
  5. zubbs1

    zubbs1 Member

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    Thank you both for the advice. Knowing this allows me a focus point on my reading here.

    Follow up:

    What is the advantage to a usb live install versus a virtual box? Wouldn't you get faster speed from the virtual box?
     
  6. lxskllr

    lxskllr Lifer

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    Live USB is quicker to setup for one time use. If you plan on using Ubuntu after you get your drives straight, a VM would be better for speed, ease of access, and ease of retaining settings, and downloaded programs.
     
  7. zubbs1

    zubbs1 Member

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    Arghhhh. I got ubuntu installed and loaded, then come to find out the 1TB seagate drive was toast and almost dead. Couldn't copy any of the data. Ran seatools and it was full of all kinds of errors. Did the seatools for dos, and tried to repair the bad sectors, and it finally died. Now there is no signal received by the sata controller.

    Sigh... nothing irreplaceable I guess, its just ones and zeros....

    Thanks again for your help.
     
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