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Need help with switches

Ryan97

Junior Member
Apr 23, 2017
1
0
1
Hi guys, it's my first post and a bit of a nooby question. But at the moment I use a basic switch which plugs in to my router then allows me extra ports to connect to my network. My question is, do large mounted switches work this way? As in proper network switches? Do they simply plug into a router (obviously they need power) or how do they work? How would I go about setting one up?
 

XavierMace

Diamond Member
Apr 20, 2013
4,307
449
126
They can, if you're just wanting to use them as a dumb switch. Setup depends on brand and network.
 

ch33zw1z

Lifer
Nov 4, 2004
33,695
12,476
146
Topic of managed versus unmanaged switches, that's so you can google it :p

like XM said, depends on what type of switch you have.
 

EdHerVA

Junior Member
Oct 5, 2014
19
0
16
Hi guys, it's my first post and a bit of a nooby question. But at the moment I use a basic switch which plugs in to my router then allows me extra ports to connect to my network. My question is, do large mounted switches work this way? As in proper network switches? Do they simply plug into a router (obviously they need power) or how do they work? How would I go about setting one up?
Ryan, I use an Unmanaged 8-Port TP-Link Gigabit Desktop Switch. It is plug and play and works perfectly: 19.99 on Amazon today. I have Verizon FIOS- 150MGb down and up
 

sdifox

No Lifer
Sep 30, 2005
85,212
9,505
126
So if you are just looking to add more ports sure. Know youbare just saving five bux.

Personally I prefer network equipment with metal shell, better heat dissipation.
 

Genx87

Lifer
Apr 8, 2002
41,061
494
126
Hi guys, it's my first post and a bit of a nooby question. But at the moment I use a basic switch which plugs in to my router then allows me extra ports to connect to my network. My question is, do large mounted switches work this way? As in proper network switches? Do they simply plug into a router (obviously they need power) or how do they work? How would I go about setting one up?
Most managed switches if you factory reset them will come up with the default VLAN for every port. Then it acts like a dummy switch for all intents and purposes.
 

VirtualLarry

No Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
51,643
6,723
126
So if you are just looking to add more ports sure. Know youbare just saving five bux.

Personally I prefer network equipment with metal shell, better heat dissipation.
Generally, I do too - except - in the case of putting the switch directly under a WiFi router. The metal shell causes the RF from the Wifi router to reflect back into / onto it, and it tends to heat up routers something fierce, burning them out prematurely.
 

sdifox

No Lifer
Sep 30, 2005
85,212
9,505
126
Generally, I do too - except - in the case of putting the switch directly under a WiFi router. The metal shell causes the RF from the Wifi router to reflect back into / onto it, and it tends to heat up routers something fierce, burning them out prematurely.

Why would you put the switch under a wap or router?
 

ch33zw1z

Lifer
Nov 4, 2004
33,695
12,476
146
meh, its a switch, shove that thing behind the cabinet like a standard user
 

sdifox

No Lifer
Sep 30, 2005
85,212
9,505
126
You've never heard of "stackable" networking equipment? Maybe there isn't enough shelf space to spread the devices out flat?

We talking home equipment here aren't we?
Besides, rackmount stuff have active cooling. My Baystack 5520-48-PWR has like six 40mm fans on its side.
 
Last edited:

Rifter

Lifer
Oct 9, 1999
11,520
747
126
I just have all my network gear mounted to the wall behind my tv, most routers and switches are wall mountable.
 

VirtualLarry

No Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
51,643
6,723
126

sdifox

No Lifer
Sep 30, 2005
85,212
9,505
126

Ezra. W

Junior Member
Nov 13, 2017
13
0
11
Lukz that is not what I was thinking of when you said stackable.

Yeah, the switch in your pic is a chassis based switch I suppose? Stackable switch generally has a dedicated stacking port on the backplane for stacking, and it uses a stacking cable that comes with the switch to connect two stacking ports. So you can operate those stacking switches as an single entity. BTW, stackable switch is more cost friendly than this higher-end chassis switch.
 

sdifox

No Lifer
Sep 30, 2005
85,212
9,505
126
Yeah, the switch in your pic is a chassis based switch I suppose? Stackable switch generally has a dedicated stacking port on the backplane for stacking, and it uses a stacking cable that comes with the switch to connect two stacking ports. So you can operate those stacking switches as an single entity. BTW, stackable switch is more cost friendly than this higher-end chassis switch.

Chasis is just consolidated stacking.
 

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