Need help / advice with aquarium...

Shockwave

Banned
Sep 16, 2000
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Ok, the aquarium is established and the fish is happy. No worries there. My problem is though that the water is cloudy. I'm using an undergravel filter and have live plants, so I dont need any special filtration. My question is, how can I take care of the hazy looking water? Is there a simple water filter I can buy that would clean up the water or what?
Thanks
 

TonyG

Platinum Member
Feb 12, 2000
2,021
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What size is you tank, and how long have you had it setup for? You can help clear up some of the cloudiness with the use of a charcoal filter, or do a partial water change. I would suggest you break the tank in for a couple of weeks before adding any fish, or just cheap fish or two if it is a freshwater tank. The addition of the live plants should help speed the process up some, but still let it go a couple of weeks to let the system start to stabilize.
 

Shockwave

Banned
Sep 16, 2000
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Its a 10 gallon i believe. Been set up for...ohhh....week, week n a half. I added some straer enzyme stuff to help it get going. I may give it a few weeks and see if it doesnt clear up, it seems when I added all my chemicals is when it clouded up....
 

Kntx

Platinum Member
Dec 11, 2000
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You can get water clarifier at your aquarium store of choice. Put a capful in, wait an hour or 2 and the water should be clear as day. I belive the way it works is some chemical in it chunks all the little particles in the water together to form larger particles which can then be filtered.
 

Doggiedog

Lifer
Aug 17, 2000
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Cloudiness after starting a new tank is normal. It is just a bacteria boom. It should settle after a while when they colonize your filters.
 

BatmanNate

Lifer
Jul 12, 2000
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More frequent partial water changes are what I would suggest. Are there fish in the tank yet? Has it completely cycled? 10 gallons are pretty difficult to keep chemically stable, much moreso than the larger tanks. I would advise against additives, especially if the tank hasn't even cycled yet and there are live fish/plants in the tank.
 

Shockwave

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Sep 16, 2000
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No, the tank hasnt naturally cycled. I used some starter cycler. I used 2 additives. 1 was to condition the water, the otehr was to add slime to the fish and start the cycling. It contains enzymes to help the process along.
 

Yzzim

Lifer
Feb 13, 2000
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I want an aquarium with some fish. Nothing special or anything, just a simple tank with some neat looking fish.

Any links on how I can get started? I know nothing :(
 

Shockwave

Banned
Sep 16, 2000
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Originally posted by: Yzzim
I want an aquarium with some fish. Nothing special or anything, just a simple tank with some neat looking fish.

Any links on how I can get started? I know nothing :(
Its not too hard. Go pick up a 20 or 30 gallon starter kit. Then get your tap water tested. Buy chemicals as needed to adjust it. Try to find a good local shop in your area, not one of the big retailers. Set up your aqaurium, buy 1 or 2 fish at first. Also get some starter supplement to help you through the cycles.


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Keep in mind, aquariums are HEAVY. Water weighs an average of around 8 pounds per gallon. Plus the rocks in it. A 20 gallon aquarium can run well over 150 pounds in weight, so if you do get one dont set it up on a flimsy end table.
 

flot

Diamond Member
Feb 24, 2000
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Let it go on its own for a bit longer. One of these days you'll look at it and it'll just mysteriously be crystal clear.
 

BatmanNate

Lifer
Jul 12, 2000
12,444
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Originally posted by: Yzzim
I want an aquarium with some fish. Nothing special or anything, just a simple tank with some neat looking fish.

Any links on how I can get started? I know nothing :(


My first suggestion would be to go to the library and get a book or two on it. There is a lot more to it than one would assume. For instance, most begginers are much better off with a larger tank (ie a 50 gallon) because it has more tolerance for mistakes.

It can be time consuming. Several weeks to a month to get a tank set up and naturally cycled before you can even put fish in it. After it's set up, if you want to keep your fish healthy and your tank beautiful, then it will require lots of partial water changes on a weekly, biweekly, or at least monthly basis.

It can be expensive. It is good to pick up equipment fron failed hobbyists on the cheap, look in craigslist and the classifieds, the little nickel, the goodwill, garage sales, whereever. You'll need a tank, a stand, a pump, a filter, a heater, a hood, lighting, rocks/sand/fake or real plants, etc.

Research your fish ahead of time. Are the compatible? Don't overfill your tank. It can only hold so many fish and keep proper chemical balance. Is your water soft or hard? Get a fish that thrives in it. You will have to either naturally or artificially dechlorinate and/or deflourinate your tap water. Goldfish are hardy, but messy. Feeder fish are often diseased. Don't overfeed. Adding chemicals can cause osmotic stress for fish. It is best to naturally cycle your tank with a starter of bacteria from the filter of an established tank, or a hardy fish like a goldfish. Let the ammonia/nitrogen cycle take it's course.

There are lots of great beginner books and websites out there, but it is a hobby that can be frustrating if it's not researched patiently first.
 

Shockwave

Banned
Sep 16, 2000
9,059
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Originally posted by: BatmanNate
Originally posted by: Yzzim
I want an aquarium with some fish. Nothing special or anything, just a simple tank with some neat looking fish.

Any links on how I can get started? I know nothing :(


My first suggestion would be to go to the library and get a book or two on it. There is a lot more to it than one would assume. For instance, most begginers are much better off with a larger tank (ie a 50 gallon) because it has more tolerance for mistakes.

It can be time consuming. Several weeks to a month to get a tank set up and naturally cycled before you can even put fish in it. After it's set up, if you want to keep your fish healthy and your tank beautiful, then it will require lots of partial water changes or a weekly, biweekly, or at least monthly basis.

It can be expensive. It is good to pick up equipment fron failed hobbyists on the cheap, look in craigslist and the classifieds, the little nickel, the goodwill, garage sales, whereever. You'll need a tank, a stand, a pump, a filter, a heater, a hood, lighting, rocks/sand/fake or real plants, etc.

Reserch your fish ahead of time. Are the compatible? Don't overfill your tank. It can only hold so many fish and keep proper chemical balance.

There are lots of great beginner books and websites out there, but it is a hobby that can be frustrating if it's not researched patiently first.
The tank will never naturally cycle on its own without fish. Thats why I recommend starting with 1 or 2 fish and use a starter enzyme to help your through that first cycling.

 

BatmanNate

Lifer
Jul 12, 2000
12,444
2
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The tank will never naturally cycle on its own without fish. Thats why I recommend starting with 1 or 2 fish and use a starter enzyme to help your through that first cycling.

That's not entirely true. It takes slightly longer, but unless the tank is vacuum sealed and or surgically sterilized then it will grow bacteria and cycle given enough time. However, for our intents and purposes the best method for a fishless cycle is to use a filter from and established tank that already has the healthy bacteria for processing amonia and nitrogen in place. This does not require fish, and it will establish the cycle given several weeks and proper PH testing to determine when it's ready. Adding fish will expedite it, but can be hazardous to the fish. If you must use a fish, use a hardy one.
 

Shockwave

Banned
Sep 16, 2000
9,059
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0
Originally posted by: BatmanNate
The tank will never naturally cycle on its own without fish. Thats why I recommend starting with 1 or 2 fish and use a starter enzyme to help your through that first cycling.

That's not entirely true. It takes slightly longer, but unless the tank is vacuum sealed and or surgically sterilized then it will grow bacteria and cycle given enough time. However, for our intents and purposes the best method for a fishless cycle is to use a filter from and established tank that already has the healthy bacteria for processing amonia and nitrogen in place. This does not require fish, and it will establish the cycle given several weeks and proper PH testing to determine when it's ready. Adding fish will expedite it, but can be hazardous to the fish. If you must use a fish, use a hardy one.
Maybe if you wait about 500 years....
In order to start and complete the nitrogen cycle you need ammonia. It comes from fish shyte. Without it, you'll never get through the first stage.

 

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