Info NASA / SpaceX Manned Launch SCRUBBED (5/27) NEXT TRY 5/30 @

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woolfe9998

Lifer
Apr 8, 2013
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Every article I read says the launch was scrubbed due to "bad weather." Can anyone describe what that means in this context? Was it partially cloudy? Too hot? Too cold?
 

[DHT]Osiris

Lifer
Dec 15, 2015
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Every article I read says the launch was scrubbed due to "bad weather." Can anyone describe what that means in this context? Was it partially cloudy? Too hot? Too cold?
Certain types of clouds at certain altitudes in the flight path with certain characteristics (I'd wager static electricity).
 

woolfe9998

Lifer
Apr 8, 2013
16,187
14,084
136
Certain types of clouds at certain altitudes in the flight path with certain characteristics (I'd wager static electricity).

Yeah I would guess it had something to do with clouds. Not a storm or truly inclement weather. Sigh. For space travel to ever become even semi-routine, it can't be reliant on perfect weather conditions. This is not meant to criticize anyone. I'm just bemoaning the fact that after 60 years of space travel, the technology is still so limited as to require perfect weather conditions and all the stars aligned. Among other things, it makes space travel that much more expensive.
 

[DHT]Osiris

Lifer
Dec 15, 2015
13,763
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Yeah I would guess it had something to do with clouds. Not a storm or truly inclement weather. Sigh. For space travel to ever become even semi-routine, it can't be reliant on perfect weather conditions. This is not meant to criticize anyone. I'm just bemoaning the fact that after 60 years of space travel, the technology is still so limited as to require perfect weather conditions and all the stars aligned. Among other things, it makes space travel that much more expensive.
Requires a lot of engineering and technology development that is very expensive, and as of right now we launch rarely enough that it's more expensive to develop that stuff rather than just wait another few days. If we as a species were depending on it as much as we depended on things like sea travel, there'd absolutely be some advancements in that area and we could probably launch in anything short of an actual thunderstorm.
 

woolfe9998

Lifer
Apr 8, 2013
16,187
14,084
136
Requires a lot of engineering and technology development that is very expensive, and as of right now we launch rarely enough that it's more expensive to develop that stuff rather than just wait another few days. If we as a species were depending on it as much as we depended on things like sea travel, there'd absolutely be some advancements in that area and we could probably launch in anything short of an actual thunderstorm.

Or it may just prove to be really difficult from an engineering standpoint to create technology which permits launch in a wide variety of weather conditions within the safety margins we find tolerable for manned flight. Aircraft can fly in anything short of severe weather, and for commercial air travel I think I read the chance of a crash on a given flight is around one in a million. There are thousands of commercial flights every day.

Given the known history of rocket launches, it's considerably worse than that, and that's given the far narrower weather parameters. Even 1 in a 1000 is going to be intolerable if we expect frequent manned flight. Just 20 manned launches per day means over 6 catastrophes a year. You certainly wouldn't want to be a "frequent flyer" under those conditions.

I think we're pretty far from making space travel remotely routine.
 
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Paratus

Lifer
Jun 4, 2004
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Every article I read says the launch was scrubbed due to "bad weather." Can anyone describe what that means in this context? Was it partially cloudy? Too hot? Too cold?
Flight rules do generally limit launches to certain temperature ranges and wind speeds both at the launch site and at abort landing sites. But in this case it was due to the potential for lightning in the area. Rocket launches can actually trigger a lightning strike by providing a ground path through their exhaust from the clouds to the ground.
 
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woolfe9998

Lifer
Apr 8, 2013
16,187
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Flight rules do generally limit launches to certain temperature ranges and wind speeds both at the launch site and at abort landing sites. But in this case it was due to the potential for lightning in the area. Rocket launches can actually trigger a lightning strike by providing a ground path through their exhaust from the clouds to the ground.

Ah yes, I seem to recall reading somewhere that this happened to one of the Apollo missions, that it was struck by lightning that wasn't naturally occurring. Though the mission was somehow successful in spite of it. Would coating the rocket with a layer of non-conducting material solve this, or are they already doing that and it isn't enough safety margin?
 

Paratus

Lifer
Jun 4, 2004
16,569
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Ah yes, I seem to recall reading somewhere that this happened to one of the Apollo missions, that it was struck by lightning that wasn't naturally occurring. Though the mission was somehow successful in spite of it.
Apollo 12 which was mentioned on the last page. A bunch of other rockets have been hit.

Here’s an unmanned Soyuz that was hit but survived:
0_PAY-Soyuz-launch-on-27-May_2_east2west.jpg
 
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woolfe9998

Lifer
Apr 8, 2013
16,187
14,084
136
Apollo 12 which was mentioned on the last page. A bunch of other rockets have been hit.

Here’s an unmanned Soyuz that was hit:
0_PAY-Soyuz-launch-on-27-May_2_east2west.jpg

Yet Apollo 12 was successful in spite of being struck by lightning. Not sure about the Soyuz. I had added this to my prior post before you replied: would coating the rocket with a thin layer of light, non-conducting material be a good idea, or are they already doing that anyway?
 

hal2kilo

Lifer
Feb 24, 2009
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Every article I read says the launch was scrubbed due to "bad weather." Can anyone describe what that means in this context? Was it partially cloudy? Too hot? Too cold?
Actual lightning within 12 miles of the pad was one of the nogo hits.
 

hal2kilo

Lifer
Feb 24, 2009
23,107
10,048
136
Apollo 12 which was mentioned on the last page. A bunch of other rockets have been hit.

Here’s an unmanned Soyuz that was hit but survived:
0_PAY-Soyuz-launch-on-27-May_2_east2west.jpg
You can stimulate lighting with a small rocket. They actually do this to study lightning. The exhaust plume creates a lower resistant path. So you do not want to launch when the potential to set it off are all around you.

 

cytg111

Lifer
Mar 17, 2008
22,854
12,534
136
We are at 50% right? and 60% for tomorrow .. which gives us a ~80% chance for launch over the weekend (as of right now).
 
Nov 8, 2012
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So is this going ahead? They are entering the rocket now.
They entered last time, that doesn't mean they will launch. It's entirely dependent upon everything being checked that they are ready along with the weather being in optimal conditions for launch.


Which to be honest, you gotta wonder how much this costs us to get all ready, suited up, rockets fueled, tons of employees across the states, etc .. all to have it scrapped on weather reasons that we knew well in advance weren't optimal.
 

cytg111

Lifer
Mar 17, 2008
22,854
12,534
136
They entered last time, that doesn't mean they will launch. It's entirely dependent upon everything being checked that they are ready along with the weather being in optimal conditions for launch.


Which to be honest, you gotta wonder how much this costs us to get all ready, suited up, rockets fueled, tons of employees across the states, etc .. all to have it scrapped on weather reasons that we knew well in advance weren't optimal.
Just with what we know about the stuff in common domain, walk the planning back , it has got to be a nightmare of planning ...