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Question NAS drive okay for at rest storage in a computer? Even if not used in RAID initially?

aatroxed

Junior Member
Nov 25, 2013
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0
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I'm interested in expanding my storage and looking out for ~4TB options. I currently still using a Seagate (Barracuda 7200.10 ST3320620AS) and a Hitatchi (HDP725050GLA360) drive from circa 2006 without any failures (did I just get lucky?). As far as I can tell these were regular consumer facing drives but I'd like to replicate the durability for the next 10 years if possible.

I'll be using the new 4TB drive for mostly at rest storage; however I tend to leave my computer on all the time. Is it okay to look at NAS drives in this scenario? What if I got two of the 4TB and ran them in raid 1 to mirror in case on one drive failure? I've tried researching the topic and most articles come down to, well NAS drives have different error reporting and leave it at that. I think I'm okay living with some noise as I hear NAS tend to be louder, but its hard to tell what the delta would be compared to what I currently have.

Additionally, has the tech improved that I'm not going to regret getting 5400rpm vs the 7200 I got now for at rest storage?

I am using https://www.anandtech.com/show/12075/best-consumer-hdds as a place to start research but some of the comments complained the suggestions aren't really consumer drives. Is that fair, or do I want enthusiast drives with my eye for reliability over many years anyway?

A few considerations so far:
Toshiba X300 4TB - maybe overkill?
Seagate Barracuda Pro 4TB
WD Blue 4TB
WD Red 4TB
 

Shmee

Memory and Storage, Graphics Cards
Super Moderator
Sep 13, 2008
4,614
619
126
I honestly would not consider the cheaper consumer drives, and would only use higher end HDDs if not using an SSD. For general storage I could say a WD Red would be fine, just make sure not to get one of the SMR drives. I am not a big fan of Toshiba or Seagate drives, I have seen them fail too often.
 

aatroxed

Junior Member
Nov 25, 2013
24
0
66
I plan on using an SSD for the main drive. Specifically though, if I get a NAS drive for mostly music, video and that won't necessarily be in raid / NAS box, am I risking anything? More research got me this



WD Red 4TB NAS CMR 5400 RPM - https://www.newegg.ca/red-wd40efrx-4tb/p/N82E16822236599 - $169

Seagate BarraCuda 4TB CMR 5900 RPM https://www.amazon.ca/Seagate-BarraCuda-3-5-Inch-Internal-ST4000DM005/dp/B01LNJBA50 - $150 (non - NAS brand)

Seagate IronWolf 4TB CMR 5900 RPM https://www.canadacomputers.com/product_info.php?cPath=15_1086_210&item_id=100441&language=en - $139

HITACHI Ultrastar A7K4000 4TB 7200 RPM https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B008RTDN6E?psc=1 $126 (OEM though :S)

Toshiba X300 4 TB 3.5" 7200RPM https://www.newegg.ca/toshiba-x300-hdwe140xzsta-4tb/p/N82E16822149627?Item=N82E16822149627 - $159


Right now, the RED is the priciest. The IronWolf looks like a deal if its reliable... Toshiba looks good, is the performance for storage worth premium over the Ironwolf? There's also WD Blue that I haven't listed here. Any more suggestions/thoughts?
 
Last edited:

Charlie22911

Senior member
Mar 19, 2005
608
226
116
It’s not a question of if, but when *all* drives fail.

All new consumer facing drives that you could purchase today will likely meet your needs, with a few considerations... you aren’t likely to run into something like a host managed SMR drive. Not to be confused with drive managed.

WD Red is *marketed* for NAS applications because (among other things) they are more tolerant of the harmonics/vibrations that happen when running multiple spinning drives in the same enclosure.

For SMR, it may well be fine depending on your use case. If you are only periodically writing data but mostly reading, such as the case with storing media or games, SMR is fine. If you aren’t running a RAID array, it is also fine. You’ll want a Red Pro drive to guarantee not getting an SMR drive. Serve the home has some great videos on this.

How important is the data that you are storing? Do you have a backup strategy? Those drives are quite old.

Lastly, just a little tip... if you are willing to give up the guarantee of a warrantee, you can often save a decent amount of money if you buy an external desktop (not portable) drive and shuck it out of the enclosure. I’ve done 9x 8TB and 5x 10TB WD MyBooks for my unraid server, each a rough equivalent to the WD Red/HGST helium drives (there is some debate on what they are).
 

aatroxed

Junior Member
Nov 25, 2013
24
0
66
It’s not a question of if, but when *all* drives fail.

All new consumer facing drives that you could purchase today will likely meet your needs, with a few considerations... you aren’t likely to run into something like a host managed SMR drive. Not to be confused with drive managed.

WD Red is *marketed* for NAS applications because (among other things) they are more tolerant of the harmonics/vibrations that happen when running multiple spinning drives in the same enclosure.

For SMR, it may well be fine depending on your use case. If you are only periodically writing data but mostly reading, such as the case with storing media or games, SMR is fine. If you aren’t running a RAID array, it is also fine. You’ll want a Red Pro drive to guarantee not getting an SMR drive. Serve the home has some great videos on this.

How important is the data that you are storing? Do you have a backup strategy? Those drives are quite old.

Lastly, just a little tip... if you are willing to give up the guarantee of a warrantee, you can often save a decent amount of money if you buy an external desktop (not portable) drive and shuck it out of the enclosure. I’ve done 9x 8TB and 5x 10TB WD MyBooks for my unraid server, each a rough equivalent to the WD Red/HGST helium drives (there is some debate on what they are).
@Charlie22911 Thanks a lot. In general I still want to avoid SMR and not worry if and when my use case would make them intolerable.
I found these https://www.newegg.ca/black-wd-elements-6tb/p/N82E16822232981 and they seem to be a really good candidate for shucking. From what I understand only major difference between elements / mybooks are the warranties.

My only concern about shucking is quality. From what I understand hard drives are binned much like cpus and lower performing ones are then stuck in products like external drives such as elements/mybooks. Its either these or the ironwolf nas I think.
 

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