My job idea on getting a job...

imported_goku

Diamond Member
Mar 28, 2004
7,613
3
0
To be honest, I've never worked a job before, you know why? Because I'm a trust fund baby, there I said it. :p Funny thing is, my parents don't want me to have a job. But I realize that I'll need a job to make it in this world (after college) and so this was my idea on getting a job I'd otherwise not likely get.

It's pretty simple, I tell the employer I'm basically free trial software, try me out for two weeks and if you like me, hire me, if you don't, then the internship is over. You'd basically do this for a job where they'd normally ask for something like in computers being A+ certified etc.

1. Have you ever heard of this.
2. Is this stupid?
3. Is it more than likely the employer would take advantage of this?
4. Is this just simply a bad idea?
 

cHeeZeFacTory

Golden Member
Apr 23, 2001
1,658
0
0
you sound pretty clueless about the working world.

maybe it'll work for small businesses

for large corps, there are so many labor laws, legal issues in the hiring process, they'll never accept that kind of proposition.
 

vital

Platinum Member
Sep 28, 2000
2,537
1
81
why don't you just apply to a job like everyone else? who cares if you dont have any experience, just tell them what your goals are.
 

imported_goku

Diamond Member
Mar 28, 2004
7,613
3
0
Originally posted by: cHeeZeFacTory
you sound pretty clueless about the working world.
I think there may be a reason why....
"To be honest, I've never worked a job before"

maybe it'll work for small businesses

for large corps, there are so many labor laws, legal issues in the hiring process, they'll never accept that kind of proposition.

 

d33pt

Diamond Member
Jan 12, 2001
5,654
1
81
you sure have lived a shelter life. go forth and try your ideas and report back.
 

I Saw OJ

Diamond Member
Dec 13, 2004
4,923
2
76
Companies usually do like a 3 month trial period where they judge you to determine if they want to keep you aboard for the long run, of course you get paid for it.

You have an interesting idea though, sounds like you're always thinkin'.
 

badmouse

Platinum Member
Dec 3, 2003
2,862
2
0
Museums, art galleries, auction houses, foundations; high-end clothing stores, artsy-crafty shoppes, furniture, architecture, stationery, art books; anything having to do with music, especially classical; cutesy gimmick restaurants, specialty foods, makeup; and of course decorative jewelry and fashion all have a lot of trust-fund kids working there.

That's just what comes to mind, there are others too.

The standard method of getting one of those jobs is to have a relative or a friend (or your trust-fund banker/lawyer) call the owner and make the arrangements.

If you're into computers, note that ALL of those mentioned use computers, so even if you're not into antiques or makeup there's still a place for you.

Or, forget the trust-fund connection and volunteer at a homeless center or food bank or children's hospital. There's lots for you to do, if you really don't need to work for money.

Good luck.
 
Nov 7, 2000
16,404
3
81
ive heard of it, but its just sounds foolish

you have money, go get an education or skills and get a job for your qualifications instead of by basically begging. your method only makes sense if you DONT have an education and are trying to break into a new field...
 

pontifex

Lifer
Dec 5, 2000
43,806
46
91
goku confuses me.
are half his posts just made up garbage or what? one posts says one thing and the next post contradicts it...

maybe he should just stop posting...
 

spaceman

Lifer
Dec 4, 2000
17,563
150
106
Originally posted by: pontifex
goku confuses me.
are half his posts just made up garbage or what? one posts says one thing and the next post contradicts it...

maybe he should just stop posting...

if we all stopped posting, we would rust.
 

imported_goku

Diamond Member
Mar 28, 2004
7,613
3
0
Originally posted by: pontifex
goku confuses me.
are half his posts just made up garbage or what? one posts says one thing and the next post contradicts it...

maybe he should just stop posting...

Pontifex, I told you, I'm sorry I forced you to watch brokebackmountain. Just because two other guys had such a close relationship doesn't mean that ours had to be that way. You know we're meant to be together, right?
 

thomsbrain

Lifer
Dec 4, 2001
18,148
1
0
there's no way a big corporation would go for it. they have way too much liability and invest way too much money into training to waste on a chance like that. and there are way too many people who are qualified that they would hire first.
 

Descartes

Lifer
Oct 10, 1999
13,968
2
0
This is not a new concept. It's done a lot and it's successful for a lot of people; of course, not exactly the way you describe it.

People are hired on probationary periods quite a lot, but they still get paid. You're not going to find any company willing to assume your services for free. What you can likely find is someone willing to give you a chance, but even then these are going to be your small companies. What others have said about large companies is largely true, so don't count on that; however, if you know someone you might have the potential to get in under a contract for a probationary period, and I've seen that work successfuly on many occasions.

Still another way is to simply take an entry-level position anywhere in the company. Then network as much as possible, meet up with those in a position to make decisions in the groups you'd like to be in. You can often find ways to take on small projects in this manner that will give you credibility, and since you're already an employee there are fewer issues.

So, yes, it does work. I've seen it at small 20-employee companies and I've seen it with Fortune 100 companies. What it really comes down to is persistence, networking and a little social engineering. I found my way into MCI WorldCom while still in high school making $32k/yr doing something very similar, and it worked out extraordinarily well for me until they found out I wasn't 18.

Good luck.

 

kami333

Diamond Member
Dec 12, 2001
5,110
2
76
Like others have said, there are probationary periods and working your way up (phone helpdesk -> support -> administration)

I did do what you are suggesting and did work for free for a month before I officially started my current job, I was considered a "volunteer" for my first month. It was a research position in a non-profit lab so it's different from most corporate situations though, apparently that's my boss's policy for all new hires that don't come through the main HR.
 

bwatson283

Golden Member
Jul 16, 2006
1,062
0
0
The trust fund wont last forever, it will be depleaded at some point, you will still have to work. How do you expect the trust fund to keep adding money when your parents stop working/croak. If they dont wont you to work, then how will you raise a family? Good luck in the real world shmuck.
 

sygyzy

Lifer
Oct 21, 2000
14,001
4
76
I am glad you made it easy for us by admitting you are a trust fund baby without any job expeience because your idea just stinks of it.
 

Reckoner

Lifer
Jun 11, 2004
10,851
1
81
Tell them you're a Diamond Member on AT, which adds +5 to intelligence and wisdom (Don't mention the -5 to charisma part).
 

DaiShan

Diamond Member
Jul 5, 2001
9,617
1
0
I dunno, unless your trust fund is enough to live off for the rest of your life I don't understand why your parents object to you getting a job. It's really going to be difficult for you to get a job now. Education is important, but you just aren't going to get hired into a high paying job with no work experience and nothing more than a degree, and you'll be behind the curve starting out in entry level positions at 22 or 23. That being said, good for you for trying to get a job, but this is really the wrong way to go about it. You should apply for jobs that are in your field of study, perhaps go to your University's career resource center, they'll be able to help you at least get an interview for an Internship (with no work experience this is really the only thing that is going to get you a job making enough to live on, unless you plan on working for your family or something) Good luck to you. :thumbsup:
 

Babbles

Diamond Member
Jan 4, 2001
8,253
14
81
Originally posted by: pontifex
goku confuses me.
are half his posts just made up garbage or what? one posts says one thing and the next post contradicts it...

maybe he should just stop posting...

Goku has this tendency just to post insanely stupid threads and has no clue at all about this 'real life' thing out there.
 

Mill

Lifer
Oct 10, 1999
28,558
3
81
Originally posted by: Descartes
This is not a new concept. It's done a lot and it's successful for a lot of people; of course, not exactly the way you describe it.

People are hired on probationary periods quite a lot, but they still get paid. You're not going to find any company willing to assume your services for free. What you can likely find is someone willing to give you a chance, but even then these are going to be your small companies. What others have said about large companies is largely true, so don't count on that; however, if you know someone you might have the potential to get in under a contract for a probationary period, and I've seen that work successfuly on many occasions.

Still another way is to simply take an entry-level position anywhere in the company. Then network as much as possible, meet up with those in a position to make decisions in the groups you'd like to be in. You can often find ways to take on small projects in this manner that will give you credibility, and since you're already an employee there are fewer issues.

So, yes, it does work. I've seen it at small 20-employee companies and I've seen it with Fortune 100 companies. What it really comes down to is persistence, networking and a little social engineering. I found my way into MCI WorldCom while still in high school making $32k/yr doing something very similar, and it worked out extraordinarily well for me until they found out I wasn't 18.

Good luck.

I agree with Descartes here. If you've got a particular company in mind, then the best thing to do is take an entry level position, network, and then apply for all those internal postings that come along in your area. If you are worth a fvck you will move up.