My fancy rice cooking device.

Jul 3, 2003
73,760
57
126
#9
I don’t know why my link doesn’t work... stupid forum.

:p
 
Mar 25, 2001
18,713
1,262
126
#11
For those that use rice cookers how come you prefer them over simply a pot? It’s been maybe 15 years since I’ve used one and back then I had no idea how to cook so I don’t really have a knowledgeable opinion of them either way. What advantages do they have? Never bought one because I don’t want another contraption to worry about.
 

Kaido

Elite Member & Kitchen Overlord
Feb 14, 2004
42,634
224
126
#12
For those that use rice cookers how come you prefer them over simply a pot? It’s been maybe 15 years since I’ve used one and back then I had no idea how to cook so I don’t really have a knowledgeable opinion of them either way. What advantages do they have? Never bought one because I don’t want another contraption to worry about.
The two traditional American ways to make rice are: (aside from the microwave stuff)

1. Stovetop
2. Crockpot-style electric rice cooker (like $15 - $30)

There are basically two types of Asian electric rice cookers:

1. Fuzzy-logic with induction ($100 - $300)
2. Fuzzy-logic with pressure ($300+)

Fuzzy-logic just means it has a computer chip in it. I had a Tiger fuzzy-logic rice cooker for a loooong time & it made amazing rice! The more expensive ones pressure-cook the rice via induction heating as well:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00NUB6ARI

Here's a more reasonable unit:

https://www.amazon.com/Zojirushi-Induction-Pressure-Stainless-NP-NVC10/dp/B009QYC60S

The computer-chip non-pressurized versions are also really good:

https://www.amazon.com/Zojirushi-NS-ZCC10-Uncooked-Premium-1-0-Liter/dp/B00007J5U7

Are they worth it? Well:

1. Do you eat rice often?
2. Do you want rice available all day long?
3. Do you eat a variety of different rice types?
4. Do you love perfectly-cooked rice?
5. Do you appreciate rice that is cooked really amazingly?

I mean, rice is rice; it depends on your personal palette. For some people, boxed Chips Ahoy isn't any different from a warm, homemade chocolate-chip cookie - it just depends on how much you care about it. I had like a ~$100 Tiger non-induction fuzzy-logic rice cooker for a good decade or so & it served me well. When I switched to meal-prep (make-ahead meals) & starting using the Instant Pot, I didn't need the fuzzy-logic rice cooker anymore because the IP did the same thing. Although, the rice cooker was far better at holding rice all day for people to graze on, which is great with roommates or a family where you eat randomly throughout the day. That feature was actually super handy, because all you had to do was microwave some leftovers & toss it on top of rice for a quick meal!

I typically cook jasmine, basmati, and sushi rice. At the moment, I am only using an Instant Pot to cook rice, as I'm either cooking it specifically for a meal, or for meal-prep (containers to freeze). I would say that the best investment is to pick up an Instant Pot if you want a multi-function device, or, if you specifically want a device for rice and/or want to hold rice for hours (or all day), then you'll want to get at least a fuzzy-logic rice cooker, if not an induction model. For me, my Tiger fuzzy-logic unit was a big step forward in learning how to cook at home & actually making stuff at home, which was an enormous cost savings in my food budget & was also a big leap forward in how healthy I was eating.
 

sdifox

No Lifer
Sep 30, 2005
74,930
446
126
#13
For those that use rice cookers how come you prefer them over simply a pot? It’s been maybe 15 years since I’ve used one and back then I had no idea how to cook so I don’t really have a knowledgeable opinion of them either way. What advantages do they have? Never bought one because I don’t want another contraption to worry about.
It has to do with how you eat. Stereotypical Asian food is rice plus whatever else you decide to serve that meal. Standard Chinese meal is like three dishes and a soup. I don't want to have to deal with rice as well.
 
Last edited:

TXHokie

Platinum Member
Nov 16, 1999
2,401
30
91
#16
I bought one of those Zojirushi induction rice cooker from Amazon probably 17+ years ago. Cost me $250 then which was pretty nuts for just a rice cooker. Well it's still cranking along just fine today still and make rice a good as when I first bought it. Wish I can find a replacement pan for it since a good part of the non-stick have rubbed off and been eaten but whatever.
 

ElFenix

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Mar 20, 2000
98,153
431
126
#19
wrong
1. melt a couple tablespoons butter or heat some olive oil in a pot
2. pour in rice and start stirring it around
3. when it's starting to get tan and a bit nutty smelling, dump in boiling water as per instructions on the bag
DO NOT HAVE ANY PART OF YOUR HAND OVER THE POT THE WATER WILL FLASH INTO STEAM AND WILL BURN YOU
4. give it a quick stir, cover, turn pot to low, set timer as per instructions on bag
5. when time is up, remove lid, remove from heat, put lid back on. wait another 10 minutes
6. fluff and eat
 
Jan 3, 2001
40,000
271
126
#20
wrong
1. melt a couple tablespoons butter or heat some olive oil in a pot
2. pour in rice and start stirring it around
3. when it's starting to get tan and a bit nutty smelling, dump in boiling water as per instructions on the bag
DO NOT HAVE ANY PART OF YOUR HAND OVER THE POT THE WATER WILL FLASH INTO STEAM AND WILL BURN YOU
4. give it a quick stir, cover, turn pot to low, set timer as per instructions on bag
5. when time is up, remove lid, remove from heat, put lid back on. wait another 10 minutes
6. fluff and eat
- fried rice
 
Jun 3, 2011
10,067
145
126
#21

this thing.

i've since learned to cook rice in a pot. which is good news i guess but kinda sucks having bought such an expensive cooker.
Anyway, who knew i'd get there, so no reason to cry now, and also, the cooker still works fine, so there's the added convenience of set n forget.

FYI, i've recently had great results with the fire-off method.
1. clean rice, and if soaking, soak for maybe 4/5 minutes max.
2. get a nice heavy base pot and get it hot. really hot.
3. pour in rice and boiling hot water, and salt.
4. as soon as it boils, stir and turn off the fire. just off.

wait 12 minutes and BAM rice is ready.

essentially, the first 30 seconds of boiling "cook" the rice, the rest of the time in hot water completes the absorbtion , and you get nice fluffy rice with a bit of a bite in the middle (not crunchy, but firm, yet fully cooked).

different rice needs different water/rice quantities and longer cooking time. basmati is 12min, shushi rice is 14. soaking time is also dependant on rice type.
 

LurchFrinky

Senior member
Nov 12, 2003
242
24
81
#22
For those that use rice cookers how come you prefer them over simply a pot? It’s been maybe 15 years since I’ve used one and back then I had no idea how to cook so I don’t really have a knowledgeable opinion of them either way. What advantages do they have? Never bought one because I don’t want another contraption to worry about.
I don't think those $15 rice cookers are any better than a simple pot. They have the advantage of turning themselves off when done, so you don't accidentally burn the rice, but I've always had some sludge stick to the bottom that is kinda gross.
My Zojirushi makes excellent, consistent rice and has the benefit of additional cooking settings and a timer. Most of the time it is on 'white' rice, but we have used the 'brown' rice setting before, and occasionally we use the 'porridge' setting for steel cut oats. For the oats, we put in the oats and water (sometimes cinnamon and a sliced apple), set the timer for the next morning and wake up to deliciousness.
 

Zanovar

Platinum Member
Jan 21, 2011
2,803
57
106
#24
Im lazy with rice.! min 45 secs uncle bens/tilda done
 

Zanovar

Platinum Member
Jan 21, 2011
2,803
57
106
#25

this thing.

i've since learned to cook rice in a pot. which is good news i guess but kinda sucks having bought such an expensive cooker.
Anyway, who knew i'd get there, so no reason to cry now, and also, the cooker still works fine, so there's the added convenience of set n forget.

FYI, i've recently had great results with the fire-off method.
1. clean rice, and if soaking, soak for maybe 4/5 minutes max.
2. get a nice heavy base pot and get it hot. really hot.
3. pour in rice and boiling hot water, and salt.
4. as soon as it boils, stir and turn off the fire. just off.

wait 12 minutes and BAM rice is ready.

essentially, the first 30 seconds of boiling "cook" the rice, the rest of the time in hot water completes the absorbtion , and you get nice fluffy rice with a bit of a bite in the middle (not crunchy, but firm, yet fully cooked).

different rice needs different water/rice quantities and longer cooking time. basmati is 12min, shushi rice is 14. soaking time is also dependant on rice type.
Ha i use them to clean my rtas.dont put your finger in,the world will shiver:p
 

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