Moving from Freenas 7 to FreeBDS 9

Discussion in '*nix Software' started by CubanlB, Jan 17, 2013.

  1. CubanlB

    CubanlB Senior member

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    I have grown out of the capabilities of my freenas 7 installation and, while it was good to learn on, I now find it fairly limited when I want to do anything outside of the scope of what it was created to do by default. Also, having no real upgrade path was a little irksome.

    Anyway, I'm reusing a bit of the hardware but adding an IBM m1015 (flashed to be an IT HBA). It will be running 5 Hitachi 1TB drives in a ZFS configuration that is TBD maybe adding more drives later.

    Other specs are
    Sempron 140 (This can be upgraded if ZFS needs more cpu for what I am doing)
    8GB of ram
    Intel Dual GB nic (this not working in a LAGG configuration is what really pushed me to update this machine)
    Old Full tower case

    The main services I'd like it to run are

    NFS
    Samba (just for CIFS, no AD stuff, other that authentication, maybe)
    RSync Client
    SSH

    Other services as needed.

    Any recommendations?

    I am curious as to opinions on the best way to setup Active Directory integration. I used Winbind with freenas as it was what was included, and that worked fine with a 2003 r2 Domain controller but seemed to get flakey after I added a 2008r2 DC.

    I have had good luck with likewise open on Ubuntu and Ubuntu server for ssh authentication, but I am not sure if that ties in the needed pam modules for the rest services to use. (not a lot of knowledge on how this actually works)

    I want to use this project to have a more full understanding about how to tie *nix services into a windows domain.
     
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  3. Nothinman

    Nothinman Elite Member

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    Samba 4 was just released with real AD support, that might be worth looking at if you really want AD integration.

    My only real suggestion would be to use a Linux distribution because of the package management. I know FreeBSD has packages and ports but neither are anywhere near as well done as a system like dpkg/apt on Debian.
     
  4. CubanlB

    CubanlB Senior member

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    I can't seem to find out a lot about ZFS support on debian other than it seems to be supported in some fashion.

    Ease of management isn't high on my list as I'd like to learn as much as possible while deploying this box.

    I will have to start reading about Samba again.
     
  5. Nothinman

    Nothinman Elite Member

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    Ah no, Linux will never have great ZFS support because the CDDL was intentionally made to be incompatible with the GPL. Hopefully BTRFS will take over that niche on the Linux side one day, but I wouldn't trust it with my data just yet. Personally, I just stuck with XFS or ext4 and mdadm/LVM if I want anything extra underneath of it.

    If you want to force yourself to learn you could do a LFS install, but I wouldn't recommend using LFS for a daily driver.
     
  6. ethebubbeth

    ethebubbeth Golden Member

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    Yup, that is the crux of the issue. ZFS cannot be included in the linux kernel because of the license incompatibility, so it has to run as a FUSE module in userland. This curbs performance and reliability.

    If you want the best ZFS experience you need to run a flavor of Solaris Unix or BSD.

    Edit: I'm running the latest version of FreeNAS 8 and it's a lot more versatile now that they've implemented BSD Jail functionality for their plugin system. You can extend the system a lot further beyond the basic FreeNAS 8 functionality. In addition to various BSD flavors, it could be worthwhile to take a look at OpenIndiana, which uses the ilumos kernel and is based upon the now defunct OpenSolaris.
     
    #5 ethebubbeth, Jan 17, 2013
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2013
  7. Nothinman

    Nothinman Elite Member

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    And BSD and Solaris give such a terrible experience in every other way that IMO it's not worth the trade-off.
     
  8. CubanlB

    CubanlB Senior member

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    I was just reading about the openindiana project, and I think I will check it out in a VM.

    Why is the BSD experience any more terrible than any other? I assume there is functional package management, if not the most elegant. Most of what I want to deploy would be the core services of any unix-like os ,aside from ZFS. I guess I don't need ZFS, but most of the stuff I do at home is to make me more familiar with technologies I find interesting.

    I'm fine with it being difficult as long as I get something out of it.

    I haven't started building any of this yet so I am open to changing course.
     
  9. Nothinman

    Nothinman Elite Member

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    If your primary goal is learning then any of them will be fine and you should consider installing and doing the same things on a few different ones so that you can get experience with the differences. Lots of things are the same (e.g. apache is apache regardless of platform) but there's many subtle differences between every unix system.

    I just stick with Debian these days because I don't care to mess with that stuff any longer. If I want Samba 4 I just either type 'apt-get install samba4' or use one of the other frontends to find and install it. That gets me a working basic config that I tweak to do what I want.
     
  10. skyking

    skyking Lifer

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    I'll second the post above. I started out with freeBSD and using the ports system, but these days I'd rather use apt, and have things just work 99% of the time. FreeBSD's ports are often a revision or two behind on software, so if you want the latest you have to compile your own, and fix dependencies, and, and.......
    There used to be some romance in knowing all the switches and things to build stuff from scratch. Now it is just that much more drudgery.
    Using Deb or Ubuntu does not preclude one from having this kind of "fun", it just means you don't necessarily need to.
     
  11. CubanlB

    CubanlB Senior member

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    And yeah, after a few days of trying to make FreeBSD 9 work with samba 4 and not having all the features built in and then tracking down why they aren't working, and having like little to no documentation, other than people telling me to read the non existent documentation...

    I will most likely just give debian a shot, if I'm unsuccessful with just samba 3.x and BSD.