Monitor Repair Issue

Discussion in 'Highly Technical' started by dj10fld, Jan 16, 2013.

  1. dj10fld

    dj10fld Junior Member

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    I just recently came into possession of a Samsung LED monitor with a broken power connector. I was told if i could fix it it would be mine. I was able to open up the monitor remove the connector and just hard wired (i.e. soldered) the power connector to the board as there was only 2 wires (assuming 1 positive and 1 negative). I soldered the negative to the ground and positive to VCC1. The monitor works. However I am concerned about safety. As long as no water or moisture gets in. And there are no shorts wiring as far as I know. I want to know are there any fire hazards in what I just did. is the current high enough to spark a fire in these monitors.
     
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  3. imagoon

    imagoon Diamond Member

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    Maybe dab it with a sealer but as long as the solder work done well I would expect it to be fine. If you did a shoddy job, then likely not.
     
  4. Harvey

    Harvey Administrator<br>Elite Member
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    Did the monitor come with a three wire AC power connector like this?

    [​IMG]


    Most contemporary monitors use this kind of three wire connector and an AC power cord with the appropriate plug for the region (U.S., Europe, etc.). The middle connector is chassis ground. The other two are hot and common.

    If that's what your monitor had, and you want to solder the AC wires directly to the circuit board, you need to know which of the remaining wires is hot and which is common. A better solution would be to find an electromechanical replacement AC receptical and solder it back into the circuit board. That will automatically keep everything polarized the way it was intended.

    These sockets should be inexpensive (a couple of bucks) and not hard to find at any electronic parts store. Assuming it's PC mounted, you want to ask for an EIC AC receptical. The most common difference between the ones you'll find is whether they're straight or right angle mounted.

    Good luck. :)
     
    #3 Harvey, Jan 16, 2013
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2013
  5. dj10fld

    dj10fld Junior Member

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    It didnt come with AC Power. The AC Power is connected to an external power supply. The connector I removed was a DC connector (14 V @ 2.14A/30 W). The connector had 4 pins soldered to the board (1 was VCC1 = power and 3 were ground all connected in series..for each external side of the connector). What I would like to know is does the connector offer some sort of circuit protection, because from my view it doesn't (just a plastic connector that houses the spades and pins that solder to the board.
     
  6. C1

    C1 Golden Member

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    No big deal. That kind of setup is for convenience of detaching the PS from the display screen for portability. The main thing is to ensure that the power cord is reinforced at the screen body entrance so it is not easily separated (ie, pulled away) from the internal circuit board. Generally this is done by creating or tying the cord into knot on the inside of the case so that it cannot pull thru the case. This, of course, guards against pull stress on the inside solder attachment points.