ml and cc are not the same

Discussion in 'Highly Technical' started by Jerboy, Mar 11, 2002.

  1. Jerboy

    Jerboy Banned

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    In a regular context, we assume that ml and cc are equilvalent. They're actually not. I read this somewhere on the net or in a book. The particular source said that they're different by very minute quantity. This popped into my mind today, because a data on water I was reading indicates the difference. It states that density of water at 3.98°C is 1.000000g/ml or 0.999972g/cc. If you don't believe me, look in Merck Index 12th edition, chemical # 10175, water.


    I know I read it once already, but I'd like the exactly number in the book again. I didn't find anything on Google. Just about everything I found there assumed ml=cc.
     
  2. 454Casull

    454Casull Banned

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    Maybe the editor decided to have some fun. And this belongs in HT? :)
     
  3. Demon-Xanth

    Demon-Xanth Lifer

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    They did thier calculations on an early Pentium
     
  4. ElFenix

    ElFenix Elite Member<br> Super Moderator<br>Off Topic
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    ummm... didn't the french define a mL = cm^3? merck can't just redefine it.


    yet another indication that companies are becoming too powerful.
     
  5. highwire

    highwire Senior member

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    Yes, this difference between the milliliter and the cubic centimeter was well known among the well trained.

    An old chem. textbook has the definition as 1 milliliter = 1.000027 cc.
    I looked at a few pages at link to try to sort it out. Not much help with the old definitions.
    I think, with SI/MKS and the redefinition of the meter, etc., they are now the same. However, it is still murky to me just what the EXACT weight/density of water is under the SI.

    Edit: Ok, the answer is in your orig post. water weighs a little less than 1 gram/cc. The ml had been defined as the volume of 1 gram of water - a small amount larger than 1 cc.
     
  6. Jerboy

    Jerboy Banned

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    << Yes, this difference between the milliliter and the cubic centimeter was well known among the well trained.

    An old chem. textbook has the definition as 1 milliliter = 1.000027 cc.
    I looked at a few pages at link to try to sort it out. Not much help with the old definitions.
    I think, with SI/MKS and the redefinition of the meter, etc., they are now the same. However, it is still murky to me just what the EXACT weight/density of water is under the SI.

    Edit: Ok, the answer is in your orig post. water weighs a little less than 1 gram/cc. The ml had been defined as the volume of 1 gram of water - a small amount larger than 1 cc.
    >>




    Thanks highwire. Headsup from someone was exactly what I needed. Now can somebody come up with a few more credible sites? Didn't find anything on National Institutes of Standards and Technology homepage.
     
  7. highwire

    highwire Senior member

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    Here is another link - the history of the liter: Text

    Interesting site for the history of other units as well. One who was involved with making the meter met the guillotine. Envy reigned then in France as a national policy of madness.
     
  8. exp

    exp Platinum Member

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    Interesting...