Mint 14 released, 'Nadia'

Discussion in '*nix Software' started by Bateluer, Nov 23, 2012.

  1. Bateluer

    Bateluer Lifer

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    http://www.linuxmint.com/rel_nadia_whatsnew.php

    I prefer Mint over Ubuntu for a desktop *nix OS, better UI.

    The torrent is probably the best way to grab it right now.
     
  2. LumbergTech

    LumbergTech Diamond Member

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    What is the difference between the "MATE" desktop and the "Cinnamon" desktop?

    Based on what I am reading, I am going to try Cinnamon, but I would be interested in other's input
     
    #2 LumbergTech, Nov 23, 2012
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2012
  3. lxskllr

    lxskllr Lifer

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    Mate is Gnome2, exactly. It was forked, and the names of some programs changed, but it's Gnome2. Cinnamon is a sane version of Gnome3. It uses the Gnome3 programs, but has a traditional desktop.

    I prefer Mate, but I'm not convinced the project will last. Gnome is a huge code set to maintain for one or two devs, and it likely won't change. Once the base technology gets deprecated in mainstream, where will it go? I think the code will turn into a mess, and it'll die a slow death. Cinnamon is built with current tech, so it should be easier to maintain. I think it has a better chance of surviving.

    My speculation doesn't affect what you or I do today, but I like picking winners. I loved the Gnome2 desktop, but it's gone. I'm not willing at this time to prolong the inevitable with Mate. FWIW, I use Xfce. I've made it look like Gnome2, and it has some niceties of its own that make it worth running. It isn't as fully featured as Gnome2, but I'm happy with it. I also feel I'm on the same page as the devs. A solid classic desktop experience, with slow gradual changes. I don't think they'll be doing anything crazy any time soon.
     
  4. obidamnkenobi

    obidamnkenobi Senior member

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    I just installed Mint 13 a few months ago (as my re-entry to linux..). What's the best way to do and upgrade re-install and minimize setup tweaking? Can I keep my /home folder and just slap 14 onto the 13 partition? Or should I redo everything? Copy apps from home and put them back in afterwards? Will it make a difference?
    Sorry for basic questions, I'm still working on understanding how the linux file/install structure works.

    After flirting with KDE and some serious customization craziness on mint 13 I ended up going back to Cinnamon. KDE was cool, but in the end I'm not sure all my messing around really helped me much.. Cinnamon really is a nice, no fuss DE. I have Ubuntu 12.10 on my laptop and it's nice, but once I re-install I think I'll be staying with Mint on my main machine.
     
  5. lxskllr

    lxskllr Lifer

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    Any reason you don't want to do an in place upgrade? That would likely be easiest. Otherwise, I'd use your exiting /home partition. I'm not familiar with Mint's installer, but you may have to go through some kind of advanced setup to use your existing /home.

    Edit:
    Meant to quote myself
     
    #5 lxskllr, Nov 27, 2012
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2012
  6. obidamnkenobi

    obidamnkenobi Senior member

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    I thought recommended practice was to do a fresh install for a new version? At least that's what I've read for the ubuntu releases..

    If I can keep my existing /home with what's installed there that would be helpful, but if an in place upgrade works fine that would of course be easiest
     
  7. lxskllr

    lxskllr Lifer

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    Ubuntu has a reputation for rocky upgrades, but they've always gone well for me. I'd backup /home to a different drive, and then in place upgrade. If it works right, it's as easy as it'll get. If something gets hosed, you're only out a bit of time.
     
  8. Bateluer

    Bateluer Lifer

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    I'd had Ubuntu upgrades go south, but I think that was mostly because I attempted it on launch day. :/ Sub 10kbps download speeds on the package downloads.


    Has anyone attempted installing Mint 14 or Ubuntu 12.10 on a Macbook Air(2011) yet? Most of the articles and guides I see with a Google search are several months old, and it appears like its a bit of PITA.
     
  9. lxskllr

    lxskllr Lifer

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    I was just thinking about it, and realized I assumed you had a separate /home partition. If that isn't the case, keeping it might be a little more complicated. It would likely have to be migrated by the installer, and I don't know if there's anything configured to do that. For a clean install, if you have everything in one partition. I'd backup /home, install, then manually copy over the the parts you want. If you don't use a separate /home, you may want to consider it for your next install. It makes keeping your old data easier when you have to reinstall.
     
  10. obidamnkenobi

    obidamnkenobi Senior member

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    Thanks.
    I do have a separate partition for /home. Cut my 128GB SSD into system, home and a 7GB extra partition, for testing other distros and whatnot.

    I did the backport upgrade last night, to get the new cinnamon 1.6 and file manager from 14 into 13 without upgrading, with not great results. The Menu stopped working occasionally, and the Win/super button no longer brought it up, which really messes with me since I'm so used to it. Tried to revert to old cinnamon but in the end hosed it completely and I have no desktop at all now. Have to boot into gnome classic. I'll do a complete reinstall of Mint 14 I think.
    I try not to be tempted to revert to my win 7 install, but now that I spend more time setting up and messing with my computer than using it, or playing games (little luck with Wine..) it's a bit hard. The alluring temptations of Balmer are hard to resist..
     
  11. lxskllr

    lxskllr Lifer

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    Well, it's already broken, so a full upgrade won't break it anymore. It doesn't hurt to try, but I wouldn't expect much.

    As far as Windows vs GNU/Linux goes, that's personal preference. I like playing with my setup, or rather I like the ability to play with my setup. It didn't take me long to get it where I wanted it, and it's only made slow evolutionary changes. I'm allowed to change it though. No hoops to jump through, and no hassles other than technical ones.

    For games, if that's a primary use for you, you should probably at least dual boot. I don't game much anymore, and I've been happy with the games that have native support. I will be getting Bioshock3 when it comes out, and Vista will get used for the first time in a couple years, but otherwise, I don't miss a single thing from Windows. Sometimes I miss Foobar2000 a little bit, but DeaDBeef has filled most of that desire.
     
  12. obidamnkenobi

    obidamnkenobi Senior member

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    yeah, full re-install should fix it. Since I did the install not long ago it's not much of a loss anyway. I too like the ability to change my setup, and the freedom that linux allows, and (mostly) enjoy tweaking stuff. Just feel that lately it's been a little much.. Once I get it set up again I'll refrain from messing around too much (installing, then deleting KDE etc) and hopefully it'll be more stable.

    I don't game much either these days so doing 99% linux shouldn't be a problem, just keep my win 7 partition just in case. If I can get civ 4 and some Paradox games working i wouldn't need much else:p

    update: in case someone are interested. Formatted my mint 13 partition, but kept /home, and all the DE settings (wallpaper, favorites, shortcuts etc) were migrated over. Since my cinnamon setup was kinda borked that was not a good thing. I got my panel back, but the buttons and menu still didn't work right. May have been obvious to everyone that this would be the case, but I'm still figuring out what's placed on /home vs /
    In the end i did a format of both the system and home partition. Now have a perfectly functioning Mint 14 desktop!
     
    #12 obidamnkenobi, Nov 28, 2012
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2012
  13. LumbergTech

    LumbergTech Diamond Member

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    Currently running 14 w/ Cinnamon in a VM. I changed the theme to "Void" and I like the look of it so far. I noticed that they did a 14.1 respin due to a bug. It says if you already have 14 installed you don't need to reinstall..but it doesnt explain if I need to do something to get the changes?
     
  14. lxskllr

    lxskllr Lifer

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    Just update your system as usual, and you'll get the updates. Usually, the only time you have to worry about doing something, is when you're running a complete version number or greater behind the main release. A complete version number for Mint is a whole number. For Ubuntu it would be the 10s place since the whole number is the year, and the 10s the month.

    Mint13x - You need to see if you have to do anything special
    Mint14x - You're cool. Just update as usual
    Ubuntu12.04x - You need to see if you have to do anything special
    Ubuntu12.10x - You're cool. Just update as usual

    Every distro is a bit different, but if it's actively supported, you'll generally get security/stability updates, but not necessarily new features. You can tweak the system with backports and ppas to get new features, but you don't usually get official support by doing that.
     
  15. Paperlantern

    Paperlantern Platinum Member

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    I will likely try this distro in time. Iv used every one from Mint 7 so far and liked them all for various reasons. I have too many distros on the back burner right now though to get this right away.
     
  16. Phantomaniac

    Phantomaniac Senior member

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    Liking Mint 14 a lot, though Cinnamon is still buggy. The most frustrating thing is the visual tearing when scrolling up and down in an application. Happens with both the stable and experimental Nvidia drivers. Might work fine in Noveau but I can't game with that driver. Once Cinnamon is ironed out things will be pretty sweet. I love the modern effects with the traditional layout.
     
  17. Jodell88

    Jodell88 Diamond Member

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    That may be a mutter issue.
     
  18. Phantomaniac

    Phantomaniac Senior member

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    So it most likely affects Gnome 3 in general? Do you think switching to MATE would help? I'd be willing to give up some fancy effects for better performance and less glitching.
     
  19. dkm777

    dkm777 Senior member

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    Using the XFCE version in a VM. The first time ever everything works. Almost a Mac experience. Docky is great. Going to see if I can install it on my Pentium M ThinkPad.

    Edit: no can do - need PAE support, which the Pentium M doesn't have.
     
    #19 dkm777, Dec 29, 2012
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2012