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Mining/Folding GPU power efficiency and 230/240V AC and PDUs?

VirtualLarry

No Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
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Anyone here using 240V in N.A.? What about Europe?

Most residential miners that I've seen, that are "serious" get multiple 30A 240V L6-30R receptacles (twist-lock) installed.

My living room has a NEMA 6-20R 230V 20A receptacle for the A.C.

Was looking at what I would need to use 240V with my PCs.
 

crashtech

Diamond Member
Jan 4, 2013
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I'm planning to do this, to ease strain on one particular circuit and to reap the benefit of slightly greater efficiency. @TennesseeTony has been doing this for a while.
 

Ken g6

Programming Moderator, Elite Member
Moderator
Dec 11, 1999
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I don't even have a 240V circuit running to my house! 120V only here.
 

Markfw

CPU Moderator, VC&G Moderator, Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 16, 2002
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I don't even have a 240V circuit running to my house! 120V only here.
Actually, I bet you do... The way most 120v systems work, is 220 coming in and ground is the main feed. The dryer and range (if they are electric, not gas) are 220v. Then the rest of the house takes one side or the other of the 220v, and the other wire is ground. Looking inside the fuse box, the 2 main wires coming in feed 2 different buses, and then the ground goes 2 places. The black wire for the house 120 is hot, and the white wire is ground, and then there is another ground. Why 2 that go the same place ?????

This is if you live in the US, I can't speak for other countries, but many of those use 220v everywhere.

Edit: I know this, as I am a amateur electrician , but all the work I did on my house passed inspections, and had a permit. I just don't mess with setting up the breaker box to the main feed. Just breaker box out to the house, and the house wiring..
 
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crashtech

Diamond Member
Jan 4, 2013
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I've never seen a home that didn't have at least single phase 240V in the box. Whether they wired anything with it is a different story. I suppose if a house is all gas heat, even the range and the dryer, there might not be any call for 240 beyond the panel.
 

TennesseeTony

Elite Member
Aug 2, 2003
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www.google.com
I don't even have a 240V circuit running to my house! 120V only here.
That truly is most unusual. You don't have any central air conditioning even? That is the only thing that can't (efficiently) run off of Natural Gas or Propane I can think of. I would be most interested in seeing a picture of your breaker box...
 

TennesseeTony

Elite Member
Aug 2, 2003
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Using 220-240v is pretty simple, Larry, but if you do it RIGHT, it costs a bit. 220-240v outlets can be a bit hard to find cheaply (but you already have one, apparently), but then you also have to have even more expensive 'computer cords' to go from the outlet to the PSU.

The 'cheap' method is to have a quality power strip that DOES have a built-in breaker, but that does NOT have surge protection. I use these. DO NOT USE SURGE PROTECTORS (don't ask how I know)

FIRST: Paint them red and label it as 240v repeatedly!!! Unless you are single like me, then, ehh...

2nd: cut the plug and put the appropriate 240v plug that matches your outlet on it. These plugs run about $12 in hardware stores.

3rd: Make sure your PSU is auto-switching, or flip the red switch if NOT auto. (worst case scenario you have to open up your PSU and replace the fuse on the circuit board if you forget) (don't ask how I know)

4th: Use your 'normal' PSU power cables and enjoy 2-3% more efficiency! :)

5th: Maybe get some child protector outlet blocker for unused outlets.
 
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VirtualLarry

No Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
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I was looking at a Tripp-Lite 240V metered PDU, with a C19 connector, that comes with a removable cable, and then a separate NEMA 6-20R to C19/C20 plug cable, and then using C13 to C14 cables to the PSUs from the PDU, and I have APFC PSUs, so no red switch.

This is the type of outlet that I have in the wall:

 

Endgame124

Senior member
Feb 11, 2008
726
471
136
Using 220-240v is pretty simple, Larry, but if you do it RIGHT, it costs a bit. 220-240v outlets can be a bit hard to find cheaply (but you already have one, apparently), but then you also have to have even more expensive 'computer cords' to go from the outlet to the PSU.

The 'cheap' method is to have a quality power strip that DOES have a built-in breaker, but that does NOT have surge protection. I use these. DO NOT USE SURGE PROTECTORS (don't ask how I know)

FIRST: Paint them red and label it as 240v repeatedly!!! Unless you are single like me, then, ehh...

2nd: cut the plug and put the appropriate 240v plug that matches your outlet on it. These plugs run about $12 in hardware stores.

3rd: Make sure your PSU is auto-switching, or flip the red switch if NOT auto. (worst case scenario you have to open up your PSU and replace the fuse on the circuit board if you forget) (don't ask how I know)

4th: Use your 'normal' PSU power cables and enjoy 2-3% more efficiency! :)

5th: Maybe get some child protector outlet blocker for unused outlets.
If you’re doing all that work, I hope you’re already using titanium power supplies for max efficiency
 

Assimilator1

Elite Member
Nov 4, 1999
23,832
331
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I have a 12yr old Corsair TX 650 PSU which doesn't have a voltage selector switch :p
230v here in the UK JFYI.

From what I've seen in PSU reviews, the higher voltage gains about 2-3% efficiency :) (as Tony mentioned).

The 'cheap' method is to have a quality power strip that DOES have a built-in breaker, but that does NOT have surge protection. I use these. DO NOT USE SURGE PROTECTORS (don't ask how I know)
Why not use a surge protector??
 

TennesseeTony

Elite Member
Aug 2, 2003
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If you’re doing all that work, I hope you’re already using titanium power supplies for max efficiency
Gold is my minimum, but mostly platinum, as they are rated to the same efficiency rating of 92% (at 20-50% load), as the far more expensive titanium units.

It'll blow, since the ones sold in 120V areas will perceive the higher voltage as a "surge."
It also creates a dead short (which I suppose is how it diverts the surge), in addition to tripping the internal breaker, which then trips the mains breaker.
 
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Ken g6

Programming Moderator, Elite Member
Moderator
Dec 11, 1999
15,430
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Actually, I bet you do... The way most 120v systems work, is 220 coming in and ground is the main feed. The dryer and range (if they are electric, not gas) are 220v. Then the rest of the house takes one side or the other of the 220v, and the other wire is ground. Looking inside the fuse box, the 2 main wires coming in feed 2 different buses, and then the ground goes 2 places. The black wire for the house 120 is hot, and the white wire is ground, and then there is another ground. Why 2 that go the same place ?????

This is if you live in the US, I can't speak for other countries, but many of those use 220v everywhere.

Edit: I know this, as I am a amateur electrician , but all the work I did on my house passed inspections, and had a permit. I just don't mess with setting up the breaker box to the main feed. Just breaker box out to the house, and the house wiring..
That truly is most unusual. You don't have any central air conditioning even? That is the only thing that can't (efficiently) run off of Natural Gas or Propane I can think of. I would be most interested in seeing a picture of your breaker box...
You might be right. It looks like there are three wires coming in. Here's the breaker if that means anything.

breaker.jpg
 

Markfw

CPU Moderator, VC&G Moderator, Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 16, 2002
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There aren't any double pole breakers there, so nothing beyond the box has 240V.
Yes, but notice the text.... 240/220v are both mentioned.... Just nothing wired for it in that box !!! But I still bet its there.

Edit: so is this a house ? and what country is this in ?
 

TennesseeTony

Elite Member
Aug 2, 2003
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Holy crap, Ken.....That is a first for me, 120v only in the US of A..... 240v optional, but not utilized....wow. Is this for the whole house, or are you perhaps renting only the upper or lower floor? edit: This is personal info, feel free to decline answering.....
 

crashtech

Diamond Member
Jan 4, 2013
9,785
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How can you tell that? (I'm clueless, not sceptical lol)
It's the shape. A double pole breaker is of double width, and the toggles are connected with a crossbar.

Edit: I have no idea what breakers are like in other countries, my very limited knowledge is of the US only.
 
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