Migrating Raid Arrays

Fayd

Diamond Member
Jun 28, 2001
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Can an AMD SB750 reassemble an intel ICH9R raid1 array?

i'm gonna be buying an AMD motherboard and CPU combo deal tomorrow, and want to migrate the array over.

anyone have any experience with this?

new motherboard: Gigabyte GA-MA790X-UDP4

old motherboard: MSI P35 Neo2-FR

also... anyone think a scythe ninja that i've been using thus far to passively cool an e4400 OCed to 2.7 ghz would have any problem cooling an AMD X4 945?
 
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SolMiester

Diamond Member
Dec 19, 2004
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AFAIK the array config and data is held on the drives and if moved to a like controller should be okay, dont know about AMD to Intel controller though....you will also need to turn the hard ware drivers (chipset etc) to generic if keeping the o/s build. Personally, I would start again...with backup data....
 

Rifter

Lifer
Oct 9, 1999
11,522
751
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I dont think this is going to work, let me know how it goes. One more reason to get a good hardware controller or run linux software raid.
 

garritynet

Senior member
Oct 3, 2008
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My understanding is that the SB750 will have no idea what to do with an ICH9R raid. Back up your data and then form a new raid.
 

Fayd

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Jun 28, 2001
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My understanding is that the SB750 will have no idea what to do with an ICH9R raid. Back up your data and then form a new raid.

the problem is a backup would require more harddrive space than i have on any other 1 harddrive. i can do it, but it's gonna be spanned across several hard drives.
 

Red Squirrel

No Lifer
May 24, 2003
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I would make sure to have completely separate hard drives/array then do a copy/image of the data. I decided not to do this when I migrated my server to new hardware, and also from raid 1 to raid 5 and it was more tedious and ended up taking longer.

With hardware raid it would be trickier I think. In my case the actual raid migration was easy enough but risky. Break the raid 1 (at this point old server still operational), grab new disk I bought, create the raid 5 with 2 drives on new server (a failed raid 5, basically). Copy the data over from old to new raid, then once everything was up and running bring down old server and take the other disk and add it to raid 5 and let it rebuild. I also ended up with 3 different brand of drives when I did this so I ended up later on replacing two. Set one drive as failed, pull it out, put it new, rebuild, wait, then do the same for other drive.

Either way, always have very recent backups especially when doing something like this. It's worth paying ~$300 for 2 1.5TB drives to at least do a raid 0 backup, then after you have the drives for other projects anyway.
 

garritynet

Senior member
Oct 3, 2008
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the problem is a backup would require more harddrive space than i have on any other 1 harddrive. i can do it, but it's gonna be spanned across several hard drives.


Its a RAID 1.

Just drag all your important data to whatever combination of HDDs you have, just in case, and break the mirror. All your data should be intact on both HDDs and should be accessible even on the other drive and even if you don't boot from it.

http://www.intel.com/support/chipsets/imsm/sb/CS-022836.htm

Build your new machine and drop in one of the HDDs. See if it boots. If it does, your golden! Fix all your driver issues and delete the volume on your second drive. Now go into Windows Drive Manager and select to mirror your boot drive with your deleted volume. Now you have a mirrored drive and you can migrate it to any Windows system and never worry about this again.

If it does not boot then just reinstall Windows on one drive and see if it boots. If it does then check your drivers, programs and stability. Once everything is in order delete the volume on the 2nd drive and set up a mirror for your boot drive with the Windows Drive Manger.

Finally if that does not work, and this is what I would do if I were going to do a mirror anyway, just do a clean install on one drive and then drag all your data over from the other drive. Delete the volume on the second drive and form a mirror in Windows.

The other drives you have with your backed up data are just there in case the worst happens and you somehow lose both drives from your current RAID 1.

************************************************Unsolicited Advice*******************************************************
The best thing to do, in my opinion, is to scrap the RAID 1 and just set the second drive as a "back-up" drive. Schedule up your computer to do regular back-ups from your boot drive to it. Daily, weekly or whatever suits you best depending on how you use your computer. You can even, if you have W7 Professional, do incremental image backups of the entire drive so that you will always have an image of the boot drive on your second HDD without incurring the same level of wear as your boot drive does. If your boot drive fails you can just buy a new drive and have the image of your old boot drive written to it. In under an hour, not including driving/shipping, you will be right back where you were before the drive failure without the loss in performance or the wear and tear on your second drive from a software RAID 1. If you don't have a copy of W7 Professional you can get one for $30 if you have or know someone friendly with a .edu email address.

If you want to always have your computer available to you that is still possible with the backup image drive/boot drive setup I outlined. After you do a clean install of Windows install only the updates and your critical programs. Make sure the "Back-up" settings are such that this drive will never have a scheduled "Back-up Image" created before the next step and then reverse this afterwards. Create an image of your boot drive as it is and then have that image written to one of your extra smaller HDDs. Have another of your extra HDDs in your system set as a backup for a library folder called "Critical". Attach any folders that contain critical data that you need daily to this library and have it back-up daily. If your your boot drive ever fails you can just install your backup OS drive and have access to your critical data until you acquire a replacement HDD for on back-up boot drive image. The reason to disable"Back-up" in the OS before creating an image of it is to insure that you never accidentally over write your true boot drive image with your back up boot drive. I would also just have the drive mounted but unconnected inside the case near your true boot drive and marked as a backup with a sharpie for good measure.

Finally if you are using W7 and you migrate to an AMD board, I suggest not installing any drivers whatsoever. Just run the board with the Microsoft drivers for a bit and see how it performs. I think you will see, as I have, that it actually performs better than if you use the AMD drivers. I use an ASUS MB so my experience may not apply to drivers from other manufactures. That said, its no big deal to run your board a little while before installing the drivers and comparing performance.
 
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Blain

Lifer
Oct 9, 1999
23,643
3
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Its a RAID 1.

************************************************Unsolicited Advice*******************************************************
The best thing to do, in my opinion, is to scrap the RAID 1 and just set the second drive as a "back-up" drive. Schedule up your computer to do regular back-ups from your boot drive to it. Daily, weekly or whatever suits you best depending on how you use your computer.
;)
 

Fayd

Diamond Member
Jun 28, 2001
7,971
2
76
www.manwhoring.com
Its a RAID 1.

Just drag all your important data to whatever combination of HDDs you have, just in case, and break the mirror. All your data should be intact on both HDDs and should be accessible even on the other drive and even if you don't boot from it.

http://www.intel.com/support/chipsets/imsm/sb/CS-022836.htm

Build your new machine and drop in one of the HDDs. See if it boots. If it does, your golden! Fix all your driver issues and delete the volume on your second drive. Now go into Windows Drive Manager and select to mirror your boot drive with your deleted volume. Now you have a mirrored drive and you can migrate it to any Windows system and never worry about this again.
(snip)

the reason i'm using bios raid instead of windows raid is a few reasons.

i want to have accessibility from both windows and linux.

it's not necessarily "mission critical" data. just data i dont want to lose.. it would take months to reacquire all of it.

the array did not migrate to the new board. that's fine. i've already formatted the disks and made a new array on the new board, and am currently encrypting the file system prior to moving the data onto it. (truecrypt)

i realize that data corruption is just being made more and more possible, but.. oh well.

with regard to viruses, errant users wontonly deleting data, etc. that's not really a problem. and the chances of it being a problem within the next # of years until i can afford a real raid card along with the drives to form a raid6 array... highly improbable.

this is all at best a temporary solution. i dont want to be always storing my main data on my desktop/gaming PC.