Microsoft officially announces Windows 11

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OlyAR15

Senior member
Oct 23, 2014
773
113
106
Huh. When I tried to use them on the dev preview, it told me that I needed to sign in to use widgets.
Yes, you need to sign in to the widget screen, but you can still do so with a local account. Just like, for example, the W10 weather app or the MS Store. You can sign in independently of the user account type.
 

VirtualLarry

No Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
53,191
7,654
126
Yes, you need to sign in to the widget screen, but you can still do so with a local account. Just like, for example, the W10 weather app or the MS Store. You can sign in independently of the user account type.
But that requires an MS ID to "sign in", does it not? Thus, someone running purely with a local account (and no MS ID), wouldn't be able to use the Weather widget.
 

Ajay

Lifer
Jan 8, 2001
11,193
5,006
136
Huh. When I tried to use them on the dev preview, it told me that I needed to sign in to use widgets.
In my VM system, most of the stuff I can’t do is because I haven’t activated it. And I’m not going to because this is just a test. Working with applications seems fine. I don’t like the aesthetics, and the tweaking tools mentioned above aren’t getting me where I want to be. Getting used to various admin and config functions has changed - it’s just an annoying learning curve. Win 10 is a pretty solid OS, like Win7 was - I don’t plan to move on for a while. Heck, I just installed Win10 Pro on a machine using a Win8.1 Pro license and it activated with no problem; so it’s not there's necessarily a need to rush.

One thing I do hope happens with Win11 is more pervasive biometric sign-ins for most websites and application with biometric + PIN based 2FA for higher risk internet based use cases.
 

mxnerd

Diamond Member
Jul 6, 2007
6,389
970
126
But that requires an MS ID to "sign in", does it not? Thus, someone running purely with a local account (and no MS ID), wouldn't be able to use the Weather widget.
Any Outlook or Skype account should work. I have outlook.com account but I don't use it to login Windows.

I agree that the widgets are useless and I also considered not upgrading to Win11.
 
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VirtualLarry

No Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
53,191
7,654
126
Well, this is just nifty. Windows Update said that my PC didn't meet minimum system requirements for Windows 11. "Download PC Health Check" - OK, done. Says I need TPM 2.0.

I'm on a Zen2 R5 3600, 32GB (4x8GB) DDR4-3600 Trident RGB RAM, dual Intel 1TB NVMe 660p SSDs, let's look for a BIOS update, OK, there is one, flash BIOS, make sure fTPM is Enabled, make sure our other settings are restored, boot into Windows 10, done.

PC Health Check now says that my PC meets minimum system requirements. But Windows Update does not. Is there any way to refresh that indicator in Windows Update? I've tried hitting "Check for Updates" multiple times, but it does not change. That red X is annoying.
 

biostud

Lifer
Feb 27, 2003
16,024
1,326
126
Well, this is just nifty. Windows Update said that my PC didn't meet minimum system requirements for Windows 11. "Download PC Health Check" - OK, done. Says I need TPM 2.0.

I'm on a Zen2 R5 3600, 32GB (4x8GB) DDR4-3600 Trident RGB RAM, dual Intel 1TB NVMe 660p SSDs, let's look for a BIOS update, OK, there is one, flash BIOS, make sure fTPM is Enabled, make sure our other settings are restored, boot into Windows 10, done.

PC Health Check now says that my PC meets minimum system requirements. But Windows Update does not. Is there any way to refresh that indicator in Windows Update? I've tried hitting "Check for Updates" multiple times, but it does not change. That red X is annoying.
Can't you just use the installation assistant from this site?

I didn't have the possibility to get it through update, so I just used the assistant.

There's a page just like with 10 that went live on the 4th.
 

OlyAR15

Senior member
Oct 23, 2014
773
113
106
Well, this is just nifty. Windows Update said that my PC didn't meet minimum system requirements for Windows 11. "Download PC Health Check" - OK, done. Says I need TPM 2.0.

I'm on a Zen2 R5 3600, 32GB (4x8GB) DDR4-3600 Trident RGB RAM, dual Intel 1TB NVMe 660p SSDs, let's look for a BIOS update, OK, there is one, flash BIOS, make sure fTPM is Enabled, make sure our other settings are restored, boot into Windows 10, done.

PC Health Check now says that my PC meets minimum system requirements. But Windows Update does not. Is there any way to refresh that indicator in Windows Update? I've tried hitting "Check for Updates" multiple times, but it does not change. That red X is annoying.
Just download the media creation tool and install it from a USB drive. That's how I upgraded all my PCs. MS is rolling out the upgrade slowly, so if you go through Windows Update, it can take a while before they offer you the chance.
 

biostud

Lifer
Feb 27, 2003
16,024
1,326
126
Just download the media creation tool and install it from a USB drive. That's how I upgraded all my PCs. MS is rolling out the upgrade slowly, so if you go through Windows Update, it can take a while before they offer you the chance.
As I wrote above, you don't even need a USB if you simply use the install assistant.
 

Ajay

Lifer
Jan 8, 2001
11,193
5,006
136
Heh, one reviewer on Twitter had this little nibble from MS. "Microsoft says Windows 11 is like a familiar family home, but it feels like one that's still being renovated."
Now if that doesn't inspire confidence, what will :p
 

UsandThem

Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 4, 2000
15,668
6,633
146
Heh, one reviewer on Twitter had this little nibble from MS. "Microsoft says Windows 11 is like a familiar family home, but it feels like one that's still being renovated."
Now if that doesn't inspire confidence, what will :p
Upgrading to a just released OS has always had headaches, and it's only for people willing to basically be beta testers.

I saw another article about AMD CPUs and loss of performance, where AMD basically says stay with Windows 10 for now:

https://www.tomshardware.com/news/amd-windows-11-slows-cpus-up-to-15-patch-coming
AMD also advises that its customers experiencing the issues can "continue to use a supported version of Windows 10," which implies that it might not be wise to upgrade to Windows 11 until the issues are patched.
I'll see where Windows 11 is at in about 12 months, and see if I want to transfer any of my PCs over. Right now all I see is lower performance in games, with AMD CPUs, etc. No thank you.
 

OlyAR15

Senior member
Oct 23, 2014
773
113
106
As I wrote above, you don't even need a USB if you simply use the install assistant.
Yes, and that's fine if you only have one PC to upgrade. Upgrading 6 like I did would mean having to download everything again and again for each computer. Downloading once and using it to install on multiple PCs is easier.
 
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Ajay

Lifer
Jan 8, 2001
11,193
5,006
136
Upgrading to a just released OS has always had headaches, and it's only for people willing to basically be beta testers.

I saw another article about AMD CPUs and loss of performance, where AMD basically says stay with Windows 10 for now:

https://www.tomshardware.com/news/amd-windows-11-slows-cpus-up-to-15-patch-coming


I'll see where Windows 11 is at in about 12 months, and see if I want to transfer any of my PCs over. Right now all I see is lower performance in games, with AMD CPUs, etc. No thank you.
How the frick did Win 11 even get released this way?? When I was writing firmware in the 90s, that kind of retrograde in performance would have been a show stopper and would have led to 80+ hour weeks for the team I was on!
 

Ajay

Lifer
Jan 8, 2001
11,193
5,006
136
Getting used to various admin and config functions has changed - it’s just an annoying learning curve.
My bad, pretty much everything is still there. Some stuff is moved or hidden. Just need to find the 'god mode' folder hack and all will be well again.

Edit, it's the same as in Win10: make a new folder and name it:
GodMode.{ED7BA470-8E54-465E-825C-99712043E01C}
 

biostud

Lifer
Feb 27, 2003
16,024
1,326
126
Yes, and that's fine if you only have one PC to upgrade. Upgrading 6 like I did would mean having to download everything again and again for each computer. Downloading once and using it to install on multiple PCs is easier.
Ah didn't see that you had multiple computers.
 

VirtualLarry

No Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
53,191
7,654
126
I just wanted to go through the upgrade process to Windows 11 through Windows Update "organically", like my clients and potential clients might experience it.

I was just worried that my PC has been "marked" as in-eligible for Win11, at this point. Even though I've done the Upgrade Advisor, and it gave no prohibitions against installing Win11.
 

UsandThem

Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 4, 2000
15,668
6,633
146
How the frick did Win 11 even get released this way?? When I was writing firmware in the 90s, that kind of retrograde in performance would have been a show stopper and would have led to 80+ hour weeks for the team I was on!
In Microsoft's defense, Windows 10 was pretty rough around the edges for the first 6-12 months. Even after that rough first year, they always seem to find a way to break something with each update. I updated to from Windows 7 to Windows 10 after a year, and even then I would occasionally run into some major bugs (like an update pegging my SSD at non-stop 100% usage).

I think the new way to do testing on it, is to just quickly release it, and letting the early adopters be the beta testers so they can fix whatever issues that get reported. As annoying as it at times, I just always remind myself it's still a lot better than it was back during the Windows 98, ME, and XP days. :p
 

VivienM

Senior member
Jun 26, 2001
486
45
91
As annoying as it at times, I just always remind myself it's still a lot better than it was back during the Windows 98, ME, and XP days. :p
I presume you deliberately excluded Windows 2000 from that list? I'm trying to remember how old Win2000 was when I switched to it (I can't believe I had been stupid enough to order a new computer with 98SE, boy did that turn out to be a bad idea and six months later I switched to 2000... then again, given how much RAM 2000 guzzled... but... 98SE would run out of resources and require a reboot after 2-3 days), but I think Win2000 was unusually polished at launch by Microsoft standards. XP was a mess - I still remember the frozen taskbar bug that was fixed around SP1. I actually think pre-SP1 Vista on good hardware was better than pre-SP1 XP...
 

UsandThem

Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 4, 2000
15,668
6,633
146
I presume you deliberately excluded Windows 2000 from that list? I'm trying to remember how old Win2000 was when I switched to it (I can't believe I had been stupid enough to order a new computer with 98SE, boy did that turn out to be a bad idea and six months later I switched to 2000... then again, given how much RAM 2000 guzzled... but... 98SE would run out of resources and require a reboot after 2-3 days), but I think Win2000 was unusually polished at launch by Microsoft standards. XP was a mess - I still remember the frozen taskbar bug that was fixed around SP1. I actually think pre-SP1 Vista on good hardware was better than pre-SP1 XP...
Yeah, Windows 2000 was their first " really good" OS IMO. It was so stable compared to other Windows versions for "home users". I remember getting our first NT 4.0 computers at work, and I was amazed how much more stable they were compared to what I was used to (95, 98, 98SE, etc).

Windows 2000 was really aimed at businesses, but there was such support from home users who wanted a stable computer above all else.

XP eventually became good after some major fixes, but pre SP1 was pretty rough for a while. In fact, XP is the OS that taught me to wait at least 6 months before moving onto a new OS. Figuring out fixes and workarounds was fine when I was younger, but frankly I have more pressing things to do with my time than be an unpaid beta tester for Microsoft.

I really do appreciate all the people who are the early adopters though as it makes the OS better after all the fixes. :D
 

OlyAR15

Senior member
Oct 23, 2014
773
113
106
I don't recall XP being that bad at launch. Biggest issue was getting drivers for peripherals and stuff. I recall it being much better than 98.

As for W11, I'm really liking it. At first, I moved the taskbar icons to the left. Now I moved them back to the centre. I'm surprised how much better that is. No major issues, no incompatibilities. In a couple of days, I'm probably going to delete the W10 install and commit to W11.
 

Shmee

Memory and Storage, Graphics Cards
Super Moderator
Sep 13, 2008
5,848
1,255
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Does the workaround for installing on older systems without secure boot still work?
 

VivienM

Senior member
Jun 26, 2001
486
45
91
Does the workaround for installing on older systems without secure boot still work?
Yes, and there are others, like that script that was mentioned a week ago or so which let me do upgrade installs on BIOS/MBR systems.
 

VivienM

Senior member
Jun 26, 2001
486
45
91
I don't recall XP being that bad at launch. Biggest issue was getting drivers for peripherals and stuff. I recall it being much better than 98.
If you were coming from 98SE, XP was a dramatic improvement. Drivers would have been an issue because some vendors back then didn't want to support 'NT' with drivers for consumer products and so you didn't have drivers from 2000 or earlier NT versions for those.

If you were coming from 2000, XP pre-SP1 was... worse. Heavier hardware requirements for... not much benefit, various annoying glitches like the frozen taskbar, controversial UI changes like the new start menu (first real redesign since the start menu was introduced in 95). Not really any driver issues since I believe 2000 drivers would run on XP fineish.
 
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