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Microsoft Office 2010 Product Key Card... legal rights with unused Key?

Danzilla

Platinum Member
Dec 30, 2000
2,747
0
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Hello.

I have a couple question that I was hoping more experienced AT'ers could help me with.

When I got my new netbook a while back, it included a copy of MS Office 2010 Home/Student. This came in the form of a shrinkwrapped package with UPC code and says on the box: "Product Key Only. No disc inside." As well as: "Designed for purchase with a new PC preloaded with Microsoft Office 2010."

I didn't get the netbook for work so just ignored the little box. My question is, as I never opened and/or used the key code, can I resell this (legally or otherwise)?

Since the product Key Card doesn't come with the software and is intended for sale with a new PC, if I did sell it, would the buyer really even be able to make use of it?? If so, how would he even get the software to use the license on in the first place?

Thanks for any help. The license has just been sitting here gathering dust for 6 months and seems like a waste not to use somehow.

D.

 

Fardringle

Diamond Member
Oct 23, 2000
9,018
566
126
There are different rules depending on which specific version of Office you have. Check the Certificate of Authenticity on the box to see if it says "FPP", "OEM", "NFR", or "PKC".

If yours is FPP, then you have a retail license that can be transferred/sold to someone else as long as you uninstall the software from your computer first.

If it says OEM, you have an OEM license that is tied to the hardware it was sold with and cannot be transferred to another computer. This is the most likely option based on the "Designed for purchase with a new PC" message that you mentioned.

If it says NFR, you have a Not for Resale license that cannot be sold to anyone else.

If it says PKC, you have a Product Key Card license (not likely in your situation) which is a license to "upgrade" a trial version of the software to a full version. This can be transferred/resold if it has not already been activated with Microsoft.
 

Danzilla

Platinum Member
Dec 30, 2000
2,747
0
76
There are different rules depending on which specific version of Office you have. Check the Certificate of Authenticity on the box to see if it says "FPP", "OEM", "NFR", or "PKC".

If yours is FPP, then you have a retail license that can be transferred/sold to someone else as long as you uninstall the software from your computer first.

If it says OEM, you have an OEM license that is tied to the hardware it was sold with and cannot be transferred to another computer. This is the most likely option based on the "Designed for purchase with a new PC" message that you mentioned.

If it says NFR, you have a Not for Resale license that cannot be sold to anyone else.

If it says PKC, you have a Product Key Card license (not likely in your situation) which is a license to "upgrade" a trial version of the software to a full version. This can be transferred/resold if it has not already been activated with Microsoft.
Well, I can't find any of those 3 letter descriptors on the outside of the box, and seems it would defeat the purpose of finding out if I can sell it as new if I have to open the box first. :) I'd bet money on it's not being OEM, as would they really bother to box up the Key Card in a box with a UPC for OEM use? At any rate, my netbook has the Office Starter edition on it already and program link on the main start page gives the option to upgrade with a version of Office I've 'already purchased'.

Does the picture of the box I have really not help? I figured the other versions would look different. :(
 

Dahak

Diamond Member
Mar 2, 2000
3,751
24
81
If it says PKC, you have a Product Key Card license (not likely in your situation) which is a license to "upgrade" a trial version of the software to a full version. This can be transferred/resold if it has not already been activated with Microsoft.
The PKC are now the primary way that they sell office, so as long as you do not open it you can sell it to someone else
 

corkyg

Elite Member | Peripherals
Super Moderator
Mar 4, 2000
27,370
237
106
The picture in your first post reads: "For Pre-Loaded PC Only." To me that says "OEM." That is the key that can be used with the pre-loaded "trialware" provided you buy it.
 

Danzilla

Platinum Member
Dec 30, 2000
2,747
0
76
Thank you both for your answers. I was reading the box a little more closely and I see it actually shows the office URL where you can DL the office trial from, to be activated by the Product Key Card, so I guess that's what I do have.

www.office.com/productkeycard

Consider this closed.
 
Last edited:

Dahak

Diamond Member
Mar 2, 2000
3,751
24
81
The picture in your first post reads: "For Pre-Loaded PC Only." To me that says "OEM." That is the key that can be used with the pre-loaded "trialware" provided you buy it.
It not oem per say, its just that its used for any machine that has office preloaded on it. ie you go to best buy and get a laptop it has office on it, you would buy the PKC and activate it with that card.

If you do not have the office preloaded, there is a link that you can go and download the office software and then you can use the card
 

Envian

Member
Sep 1, 2011
42
0
0
www.androidfocus.net
Go to www.office.com/productkeycard and enter the KEY provided in the case. You CAN download and install and use Office on the netbook you've bought or on any other PC. But only if you're not concerned about LEGAL stuff..... :)
I can't tell you how many times you can activate the Office with one key, it's safe to say at least once...
 

LokutusofBorg

Golden Member
Mar 20, 2001
1,065
0
76
I believe all the "Home and Student" versions of Office 2010 allow three activations/installs. I looked at all the versions for sale on Amazon and zoomed into the picture of the box and all of them have the 3x Computers label right on the front of the box.
 

corkyg

Elite Member | Peripherals
Super Moderator
Mar 4, 2000
27,370
237
106
Most of those pre-loads are options that you have to buy to use the provided key. And, it is possible to buy that software when you buy the laptop. It all goes back to what you paid for.
 

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