Maybe older cars are just better??

Indus

Diamond Member
May 11, 2002
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Everywhere you look.. cost of newer car maintenance and repair is through the roof.

But I came across this yesterday:


Maybe.. just maybe all the newest smart tech isn't your friend!
 
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Greenman

Lifer
Oct 15, 1999
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I never wanted anything to do with all the gadgets they put in new cars. My pickup is the perfect vehicle for me, everything I need, nothing I don't. Though it did come with an am/fm radio, I didn't need that.
 
Mar 11, 2004
23,075
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Its not the cars or the tech that are the problem its greedy corporations run by psychopaths and the lack of consumer protections due to a government refusing to do anything about it in order to help intelligence agencies to monitor us (but not in ways that actually help Americans) that is to blame.
 

BonzaiDuck

Lifer
Jun 30, 2004
15,722
1,455
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I myself am very skeptical and unenthused about "self-driving" vehicles.

Whattaya buy a Logitech joystick or even an Oculus Rift for?! so you can DRIVE, even by just "waving your arms"!!!

I don't trust much of it. I -- MYSELF -- brought my 1995 Trooper into the 21st century, with gadgets which I carefully chose and integrated together.

I don't think so little of myself that I follow along like a Lemming for every trick devised by Elon Musk.
 
Feb 25, 2011
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Older cars were less computerized. They were often designed to be easier to repair. They were the cool thing you wanted when you were 16.

They weren't necessarily more reliable on a failures-per-miles-driven basis. They often are less fuel efficient. They often have poorer emissions standards.

Depends what you value in a car, I guess.
 

BoomerD

No Lifer
Feb 26, 2006
62,896
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Older cars were less computerized. They were often designed to be easier to repair. They were the cool thing you wanted when you were 16.

They weren't necessarily more reliable on a failures-per-miles-driven basis. They often are less fuel efficient. They often have poorer emissions standards.

Depends what you value in a car, I guess.

And depending on how old the car is...probably far less safe than modern cars. Seat belts, air bags, crumple zones, lighter materials interiors that are designed to be much safer in a crash...
 
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IronWing

No Lifer
Jul 20, 2001
69,041
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Cars are a lot better now. Getting to 100k+ miles with nothing but routine maintenance is expected now, even with cheap cars. Getting to 300k+ miles on the original engine and transmission is also expected.
 

Greenman

Lifer
Oct 15, 1999
20,378
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Cars are a lot better now. Getting to 100k+ miles with nothing but routine maintenance is expected now, even with cheap cars. Getting to 300k+ miles on the original engine and transmission is also expected.
A 100k with only routine maintenance was common 30 years ago.
The old Ford straight six engines were bullet proof. 250k miles on one wouldn't raise an eyebrow. 350k was "pretty good". I've seen 500K on one.
 

repoman0

Diamond Member
Jun 17, 2010
4,479
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I like my old cars, but that’s because they’re toys and if they need maintenance or are down I can work from home, walk, bike, or take my wife’s nice new reliable Mazda that never needs anything.
 
Feb 25, 2011
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A 100k with only routine maintenance was common 30 years ago.
The old Ford straight six engines were bullet proof. 250k miles on one wouldn't raise an eyebrow. 350k was "pretty good". I've seen 500K on one.
The same Ford that trapped water inside the doors and were completely rusted out before they hit 150k? The engines were the only things that worked.

Maybe if you lived in Arizona.
 

Greenman

Lifer
Oct 15, 1999
20,378
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The same Ford that trapped water inside the doors and were completely rusted out before they hit 150k? The engines were the only things that worked.

Maybe if you lived in Arizona.
I've never owned a Ford that had a rust issue. Been driving them for fifty years.
 
Feb 25, 2011
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I've never owned a Ford that had a rust issue. Been driving them for fifty years.
My parents owned a '92 Aerostar and '95 Ranger when I was a kid. Both models were well known for the bottoms of the doors rusting out. We could hear the water sloshing around in the doors after a rain.

I think it was something specific to those models and their related light trucks.
 
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bbhaag

Diamond Member
Jul 2, 2011
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I don't think older vehicles are better I think they are just easier to work on. Factor in the nostalgia and next thing you know a lot of people think older vehicles are better. I suspect that a decade or two from now people will be saying the same thing about vehicles manufactured now.

It's just the way it is.
 

Greenman

Lifer
Oct 15, 1999
20,378
5,122
136
I don't think older vehicles are better I think they are just easier to work on. Factor in the nostalgia and next thing you know a lot of people think older vehicles are better. I suspect that a decade or two from now people will be saying the same thing about vehicles manufactured now.

It's just the way it is.
Less complicated is generally a good thing. Simple design, simple systems, simple repairs. The tradeoff is performance and fuel economy. My fathers F250 had enough room in the engine bay that I could stand on the ground next to the engine to tune it every 10k miles. It got 8 mpg and produced around 100 HP.
 

bbhaag

Diamond Member
Jul 2, 2011
6,657
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Less complicated is generally a good thing. Simple design, simple systems, simple repairs. The tradeoff is performance and fuel economy. My fathers F250 had enough room in the engine bay that I could stand on the ground next to the engine to tune it every 10k miles. It got 8 mpg and produced around 100 HP.
Oh yeah don't get me wrong I love older vehicles to for this same reason. Simple design and simple systems make it a lot easier for the end user to repair them when they break.

All I'm saying is that with those simpler designs also comes some drawbacks. Newer vehicles are safer, more fuel efficient, more emissions friendly, etcetera. Anyway, it's probably safe to say that both have their own set of pluses and minuses.:)
 
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Red Squirrel

No Lifer
May 24, 2003
67,385
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www.anyf.ca
I hate that all the new cars basically are cloud connected now too. They keep a record of every single place you go or everything you do. You can even call the dealer to ask for that record if you want to and it's very granular. I wish they would still make cars simple, like in the 90's. And with 90's pricing to go with it.
 
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Nov 17, 2019
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I had a couple of 80s Fords and Mercs that had rust/rocker panel issues. I have a 95 now that does not, but it's rarely driven and never in snow.

I see all kinds of horror stories of new $100K vehicles where the engine eats itself in a coupld of thousand miles with no warning. Also where transmissions die and go into limp mode long enough for you to find a place to park it. Electrical issues too. Remote software updates that get corrupted and disable the vehicle. Dealers can't even get the system rebooted to factory and have to buy the owner out.
 

evident

Lifer
Apr 5, 2005
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late 2000's cars for me are the sweet spot... my 2008 TSX has everything i need. Heated seats, AC and a place to stick my phone to use my nav. and i added bluetooth for the tunes
 

GodisanAtheist

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Nov 16, 2006
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Favorite car I've ever driven was a 1997 Lexus ES300. Wife got it for $5000 cause some old lady that couldn't drive anymore had it sitting in her driveway.

Magnificent 3L V6 with 200HP, plenty of power and get-to.

Nice clean simple dash without a billion screens blinding you at night. Old enough to have a tape deck so you still got to use an MP3 player or iPod to listen to music while driving.

Nice looking car in that ghetto-money kind of way.
 

evident

Lifer
Apr 5, 2005
11,904
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Favorite car I've ever driven was a 1997 Lexus ES300. Wife got it for $5000 cause some old lady that couldn't drive anymore had it sitting in her driveway.

Magnificent 3L V6 with 200HP, plenty of power and get-to.

Nice clean simple dash without a billion screens blinding you at night. Old enough to have a tape deck so you still got to use an MP3 player or iPod to listen to music while driving.

Nice looking car in that ghetto-money kind of way.
ES vehicles are nice and bulletproof in general. not the most interesting vehicle but they are very respectable and trouble free. RX's are similar in that way too for an SUV.