Question Massive new Intel manufacturing facility coming to Ohio

GunsMadeAmericaFree

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Jan 23, 2007
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I just saw a news blurb that stated that in New Albany, Ohio, they annexed 5 SQUARE MILES of land in order to entice Intel to build a new manufacturing center in the area.

I wonder what, exactly, they will be manufacturing there???
 

Ajay

Lifer
Jan 8, 2001
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Can't find anything about Intel moving there. There is a large industrial redevelopment project under development in New Albany.
 

dullard

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May 21, 2001
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Just because they're enticing Intel to move there doesn't mean Intel has agreed to such.
This "divided we fall" tactic that the states are fighting really ticks me off. So much wasted money to maybe possibly entice a company. This just pulls it from another state, so there is no net gain for America as a whole. And even if the company is enticed, it might not actually do much of anything (see Foxconn in Wisconsin).
 

GunsMadeAmericaFree

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Jan 23, 2007
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Details about new $20 billion Intel factory

3,000 new jobs seems pretty impressive....
Other articles say Intel is looking long term to create a $100 billion facility that would employ roughly 10,000 people in total...

I am wondering if Governor Dewine might be wanting to use this to show that he can bring jobs 'back to America', and could even be planning to use it to help launch a presidential run.....
 
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DrMrLordX

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This "divided we fall" tactic that the states are fighting really ticks me off.
Enough of the Chamber of Commerce types have signed off on these deals that it's nearly impossible to function without them. Businesses won't move unless courted. It's kind of a prisoner's dilemma: if your local/state authorities decide to stop offering land/tax incentives, will everyone else cooperate? Probably not.

Details about new $20 billion Intel factory

3,000 new jobs seems pretty impressive....
Okay so it looks like they really are building something there. Intel sure is splashing a lot of cash lately.
 

dullard

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May 21, 2001
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Enough of the Chamber of Commerce types have signed off on these deals that it's nearly impossible to function without them. Businesses won't move unless courted. It's kind of a prisoner's dilemma: if your local/state authorities decide to stop offering land/tax incentives, will everyone else cooperate? Probably not.
Oh I agree that it is the way of the country right now, but it is a bad thing for the country. In Wisconsin, for the Foxconn project the government has already spent ~$200 million for land (pushing people out of their homes and farms), $185 million for water and sewers, $342 million for roads, all for a planned 1454 jobs (scaled back from the original promises of 13,000 jobs). That adds up to $500,000 of our tax money per planned job created. But as of 2020, only 281 jobs were actually created, making this $2.5 million per job so far.

The only way to stop it will never happen, but the federal government would have to tax the businesses at 100% of the subsidies they get, and then lower personal income taxes an equivalent amount (so this is revenue neutral). Then businesses would base their decisions mostly on the right location for their work. It won't happen, but it would stop this ridiculous abuse of our money.

Sorry to make this thread political.
 

Doug S

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Feb 8, 2020
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Enough of the Chamber of Commerce types have signed off on these deals that it's nearly impossible to function without them. Businesses won't move unless courted. It's kind of a prisoner's dilemma: if your local/state authorities decide to stop offering land/tax incentives, will everyone else cooperate? Probably not.

It would need to be a federal law, but good luck getting enough agreement as there are probably always enough potential deals in the pipeline that congressmen from enough states would feel it is to their advantage to keep the current race to the bottom in place.

Remember the Amazon second HQ hunger games from a couple years ago? Now there's Intel with its subsidized fabs, as well as companies like Microsoft, Google, Apple, Facebook, Amazon always building more datacenters wherever the incentives are the best. Plus there are always companies looking to move their HQ or main office to escape taxes or find cheaper employees or whatever, and the pandemic dislocations with "work from home" becoming permanent for some will totally change that game in ways we can't yet fully foresee.

Imagine if people could do that - I'm looking to move so states court me with special income tax deals, or let me build a custom home but pay no property taxes above those for the raw land for the first 15 years or whatever. Welfare is bad, unless corporations are the ones getting it I guess!
 

eek2121

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Aug 2, 2005
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A few more details, notably, Intel also plans to have space for suppliers.

I think this is a good idea.
Oh I agree that it is the way of the country right now, but it is a bad thing for the country. In Wisconsin, for the Foxconn project the government has already spent ~$200 million for land (pushing people out of their homes and farms), $185 million for water and sewers, $342 million for roads, all for a planned 1454 jobs (scaled back from the original promises of 13,000 jobs). That adds up to $500,000 of our tax money per planned job created. But as of 2020, only 281 jobs were actually created, making this $2.5 million per job so far.

The only way to stop it will never happen, but the federal government would have to tax the businesses at 100% of the subsidies they get, and then lower personal income taxes an equivalent amount (so this is revenue neutral). Then businesses would base their decisions mostly on the right location for their work. It won't happen, but it would stop this ridiculous abuse of our money.

Sorry to make this thread political.
IIRC Foxconn is now up to nearly 700 jobs, so not a total failure.
 
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Ajay

Lifer
Jan 8, 2001
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Details about new $20 billion Intel factory

3,000 new jobs seems pretty impressive....
Other articles say Intel is looking long term to create a $100 billion facility that would employ roughly 10,000 people in total...

I am wondering if Governor Dewine might be wanting to use this to show that he can bring jobs 'back to America', and could even be planning to use it to help launch a presidential run.....
Good find!
 

Joe NYC

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Jun 26, 2021
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More like "guess there will be extra groundwater pollution for you then".

(honestly I hope not, but . . .)
They say that modern fabs recycle water so well that there is very little water that leaves the fab.

We know that fabs use a lot of water during various steps. If the water was not recycled, it would not make sense to build fabs in Arizona.
 

DrMrLordX

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Apr 27, 2000
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They say that modern fabs recycle water so well that there is very little water that leaves the fab.
That's not the only thing people should be worried about.



Granted, some of the groundwater pollution from Silicon Valley goes back to activity from over 50 years ago. But there is still a lot of nasty stuff used in a fab.
 

Joe NYC

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Jun 26, 2021
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That's not the only thing people should be worried about.


I believe that.

Granted, some of the groundwater pollution from Silicon Valley goes back to activity from over 50 years ago. But there is still a lot of nasty stuff used in a fab.
I can believe that too, from way back, but my point is that there would not be new significant ground water pollution from a new fab.
 

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bononos

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Oh I agree that it is the way of the country right now, but it is a bad thing for the country. In Wisconsin, for the Foxconn project the government has already spent ~$200 million for land (pushing people out of their homes and farms), $185 million for water and sewers, $342 million for roads, all for a planned 1454 jobs (scaled back from the original promises of 13,000 jobs). That adds up to $500,000 of our tax money per planned job created. But as of 2020, only 281 jobs were actually created, making this $2.5 million per job so far.

The only way to stop it will never happen, but the federal government would have to tax the businesses at 100% of the subsidies they get, and then lower personal income taxes an equivalent amount (so this is revenue neutral). Then businesses would base their decisions mostly on the right location for their work. It won't happen, but it would stop this ridiculous abuse of our money.

Sorry to make this thread political.
Its crazy that corporations can plumb public coffers for huge sums of money in a country that espouses free market bootstrapping and we have to apologize for making a political thread. No apology necessary, its just how business works.
 

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