Man owns ex who plotted against him via a fake facebook persona

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arkcom

Golden Member
Mar 25, 2003
1,816
0
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So step 1

Get a notary saying a death threat was just a prank for shits and giggles.

Step 2

Send Death threats.

Step 3

Get away scott free?

Fake death threats to a fake person.

How could he arrange to kill someone who doesn't exist?
 

mugs

Lifer
Apr 29, 2003
48,924
45
91
So the thought that he created this affidavit to cover his ass in case he got caught, all the while really intending to kill his ex, never occurred to the police/judge?

-KeithP

If she turned up dead, don't you think the notary's testimony would be pretty damning?

That's what I mean...for example I write "I am going to tell PERSON A I'm gonna punch him in his face and screw his sister but it's just a joke to see how he reacts" and get it notarized....then I do it and he sues me for verbal harrassment or calls the cops and I get arrested. As long as I have that notarized statement, I'm good?

It's not illegal to tell someone you're going to screw their sister, but you can't punch someone in the face and get away with it because you have a notarized statement.

Really, this isn't hard to understand people. Previously the police had reason to believe that he was asking a person to find a hitman for him. That would be a crime. Now they have reason to believe that he had no intention of hiring a hitman. Therefore he did not commit a crime. You don't need to fabricate other situations to understand this, but if you want to, it should be a situation in which no crime is actually committed.


So step 1

Get a notary saying a death threat was just a prank for shits and giggles.

Step 2

Send Death threats.

Step 3

Get away scott free?

It is not legal to send a person death threats, so no you would not get away scot free.
 

MotionMan

Lifer
Jan 11, 2006
17,312
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Please stop. Most of you do not understand that basics of notarization or criminal law, so are basically talking completely out of your asses. You are making my head hurt.

That being said, I have seen this tried on "To Catch Predator", where the guy has the note on him, without any success ;)

MotionMan
 

sactoking

Diamond Member
Sep 24, 2007
7,538
2,752
136
Notary laws also vary by jurisdiction. For example, where I live a notary only certifies that the signature is legitimate and the date of signature. In other places if the notarized statement says "I swear or affirm this to be true" you literally have to swear to the notary that it is true.
 

ElFenix

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Mar 20, 2000
102,418
8,370
126
Independent Notary Public confirmed. A big part of our "legal" system sits squarely on the idea that when sworn, it is the truth.

A Notary is the legal time keeper. They swear that said thing happened when and if they sign and stamp it did.

in texas the notary certifies that the person who said what's written down said it.
 

Ghiddy

Senior member
Feb 14, 2011
306
0
0
It is times like this that I wished I knew a notary public so I can make claims and have legal proof I made them.

There are probably 12 of them in a one mile radius of where you're standing right now. Jewelry shops, pawn shops, real estate offices, law offices, banks, and tons of other places have notaries. I had to use one once and it took $5 and I was in and out of the office within 2 minutes. Cash, the dude looked at the letter, signed it and that was it. He never even looked up at me.
 

SP33Demon

Lifer
Jun 22, 2001
27,929
142
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How is the wife not charged with computer fraud?

Fraud for what? Anyone can create a profile on those stupid sites with any name. It's not like she was bilking people out of their money. Nor impersonating a real person.
 
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MotionMan

Lifer
Jan 11, 2006
17,312
12
81
Fraud for what? Anyone can create a profile on those stupid sites with any name. It's not like she was bilking people out of their money. Nor impersonating a real person.

You do not need to get money or impersonate a real person for it to be fraud.

And it could still be fraud even if others do it and it is easy to do.

MotionMan
 

highland145

Lifer
Oct 12, 2009
43,425
5,850
136
Yes. Let that be a lesson to be suspicious about what you read in the papers :D
And there are at least 2 sides to every story. I am ashamed.



O.K. Not really.
You do not need to get money or impersonate a real person for it to be fraud.

And it could still be fraud even if others do it and it is easy to do.

MotionMan
Waiting on the teen in the pic to pop up and bust the wife for using it.
 

mvbighead

Diamond Member
Apr 20, 2009
3,793
1
81
There are probably 12 of them in a one mile radius of where you're standing right now. Jewelry shops, pawn shops, real estate offices, law offices, banks, and tons of other places have notaries. I had to use one once and it took $5 and I was in and out of the office within 2 minutes. Cash, the dude looked at the letter, signed it and that was it. He never even looked up at me.

Can't you also write up a statement, and mail it to yourself? Since the letter is not opened and is sealed, it should be verified that the document was in fact written before the date it was sent... no?
 

MotionMan

Lifer
Jan 11, 2006
17,312
12
81
Can't you also write up a statement, and mail it to yourself? Since the letter is not opened and is sealed, it should be verified that the document was in fact written before the date it was sent... no?

That is not as legally recognized as a notarized document. Of course, it could not hurt.

There are many ways to do this that may work, but the one with the most legal backing is notarization (it involves a disinterested third party who has been christened as 'honest' by the government).

MotionMan
 

Blackjack200

Lifer
May 28, 2007
15,995
1,685
126
Can't you also write up a statement, and mail it to yourself? Since the letter is not opened and is sealed, it should be verified that the document was in fact written before the date it was sent... no?

You could just mail yourself an empty unsealed envelope, and then later put whatever you like into it. Or you could steam it open. I don't think this would stand up in court. I certainly would not want to rely on it to protect me from a conspiracy to commit murder charge.
 
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SP33Demon

Lifer
Jun 22, 2001
27,929
142
106
You do not need to get money or impersonate a real person for it to be fraud.

And it could still be fraud even if others do it and it is easy to do.

MotionMan

What specific crime is committed when one creates a facebook profile for Anna Stevens (imaginary friend) or Pooky the Cat? Nothing.
 

MotionMan

Lifer
Jan 11, 2006
17,312
12
81
What specific crime is committed when one creates a facebook profile for Anna Stevens (imaginary friend) or Pooky the Cat? Nothing.

Who said it was a crime to have a fake account?

It is not improper to have a monopoly, but it can be improper to use your monopoly in a certain way.

It is not improper to have a fake account, but it can be improper to use your fake account in a certain way.

MotionMan
 
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