Question Make sense to pick up a new PSU?

GodisanAtheist

Diamond Member
Nov 16, 2006
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So I'm putting off a core system upgrade (CPU/Mobo/Ram) because GPU prices are still stupid high, but I'd like to spruce up my PC a bit.

Figured I could do a secondary part upgrade for my PC in the form of a case and a new PSU (I'd also harvest a 1TB m.2 drive from a PC my wife isn't using and ditch SATA drives entirely).

My 650W Corsair HX650 is about 8/9/10 years old at this point, and given what I'm reading about "transient power spikes" as well as outlandish power consumption numbers on upcoming GPUs I thought a new PSU would be a good place to put a few bucks as it's a part I can carry forward into builds as I go.

However I keep reading about upcoming connector standards for PCI-E and I'm wondering if it makes sense to pick up a current gen 850W or higher PSU today or wait until some of the new connector standards are established to pick up something new, especially given that my 650w workhorse has been going strong and I'm really only upgrading for poops and giggles at this point.
 

Tech Junky

Golden Member
Jan 27, 2022
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Wait. It doesn't make sense to spend now to upgrade later again. There's PCIe 5 connectors coming for 600 watt connectors. There are adapters if course that consume more power ports on either end to consolidate power into the new connection.
 

Justinus

Platinum Member
Oct 10, 2005
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Wait. It doesn't make sense to spend now to upgrade later again. There's PCIe 5 connectors coming for 600 watt connectors. There are adapters if course that consume more power ports on either end to consolidate power into the new connection.
I'd bet it will be a while before we see PSUs that have PSU end connectors specifically for the new 16 pin pcie power connector. I'd wager most power supplies are going to simply start including new cables to adapt to the 12/16 pin connector until the next actual generation of units comes out in 1-3 years.

I guess it will depend on if they can pull off the 600w 12vHP version with an adapter or if that will require an actual change on the PSU end.
 

Tech Junky

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Jan 27, 2022
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@Justinus

From what I gathered just glancing at some articles is it takes 3 cables from the PSU and then an adapter on the GPU side to combine 2 of them and then attach to the card. I didn't look into it too much though admittedly. I don't think PSU's lag behind announcements quite as badly as other components.
 

Justinus

Platinum Member
Oct 10, 2005
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@Justinus

From what I gathered just glancing at some articles is it takes 3 cables from the PSU and then an adapter on the GPU side to combine 2 of them and then attach to the card. I didn't look into it too much though admittedly. I don't think PSU's lag behind announcements quite as badly as other components.
It takes 3x8 pin cables to adapt to the new 16 pin at the 450W standard because each 8 pin cable is rated for 150W. A 16 pin direct modular cable to the power supply should be capable of delivering more power if the PSU internals/distribution board are up to the task.

Like I said, I'd wager most psu manufacturers will simply validate either the 450w or both the 450W/600W versions on new modular cables with little or no modification to existing PSU designs where possible. Next gen of PSU platforms we will see probably a new PSU side connector.
 

GodisanAtheist

Diamond Member
Nov 16, 2006
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Has there been any announcements of PSUs Supporting the new standard? Maybe PSU companies will just release a separate modular cable for their PSUs as an interim method of providing compatibility?
 

jonnyGURU

Moderator <BR> Power Supplies
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The PSU doesn't need to "support" the "new standard".

Only two of the side band conductors are used by consumer PCIe cards and these will just terminate to ground (much like the current 8-pin PCIe). So what you'll see on the market for modular PSUs is a cable with the 12+4-pin on one end and two or three 8-pin connectors on the PSU end.
 

Justinus

Platinum Member
Oct 10, 2005
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The PSU doesn't need to "support" the "new standard".

Only two of the side band conductors are used by consumer PCIe cards and these will just terminate to ground (much like the current 8-pin PCIe). So what you'll see on the market for modular PSUs is a cable with the 12+4-pin on one end and two or three 8-pin connectors on the PSU end.
I have seen some new designs supporting 12VHPWR having the same 12+4 connector on the PSU side. Is there any need for changes to utilize the 600w standard via the signal pins, or will they be able to just hook up the appropriate signal pin(s) to the 12v on the psu end and have an existing platform support it?

I lack reading comprehension. Thanks for the definitive answer.
 

BonzaiDuck

Lifer
Jun 30, 2004
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I'm a bit startled at a need for GPU connectors of the type and description discussed.

If the PSU is between 8 and 10 years old, buy a new one.
 
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jonnyGURU

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I'm a bit startled at a need for GPU connectors of the type and description discussed.

If the PSU is between 8 and 10 years old, buy a new one.
True. If it's an HX650 that's that old, that means it's probably the old Gold or Silver model at best. Which means it's archaic by today's standards. I've been doing this for 30+ years and I still don't know why people expect the PSU to last through half a dozen system upgrades.
 
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BonzaiDuck

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True. If it's an HX650 that's that old, that means it's probably the old Gold or Silver model at best. Which means it's archaic by today's standards. I've been doing this for 30+ years and I still don't know why people expect the PSU to last through half a dozen system upgrades.
For the difference in price and what I've tried to do with every system I've built until now, I pay extra for Seasonic Titanium units. I think they once had a 10-year warranty, but now I think it extends for 12.

Over the last year, I've purchased a new one unnecessarily. One tries to avoid this sort of a mistake, but it happens, and fellow gurus tell me it's always good to have a spare.

But I've had Seasonics go on the fritz. Or, I had one that crapped out just after a 5-year warranty expired.

I posted a current thread about problems arising from either a PSU or a UPS. This time, I think I had a UPS that failed, and there are symptoms on the PC which have disappeared in addition to the Event ID 41 Critical Stops ("Power event") that I was trying to diagnose. I'm pretty sure it was a defective UPS. I'll know in about two more weeks, as these critical stops were occurring every two weeks, and then every week. I believe that the switching assembly between the wall AC and the battery was failing. So every time there was a short brownout or drop in the AC from the wall, the system would crash.
 

jonnyGURU

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For the difference in price and what I've tried to do with every system I've built until now, I pay extra for Seasonic Titanium units. I think they once had a 10-year warranty, but now I think it extends for 12.
 

BonzaiDuck

Lifer
Jun 30, 2004
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Are you trying to initiate a dialogue about PSU warranties?

This matter of warranties, for corporations attempting to cultivate a loyal customer base, and who as well would like to minimize the cost of RMAs and replacements, should be a matter of statistical quality control, testing, and knowledge of what percentage of a batch of product will fail before the warranty expiration.

There was once a rule of thumb that you could roughly gauge the quality of any PSU by picking it up. Those with short life expectancies or too-frequent failures will be light. Good PSUs are heavy. And of course this shakes out as discrete to this or that manufacturer, the quality of parts, etc.

That can be a rule of thumb for the less knowledgeable, or for someone who knows more. But with PSUs, the warranty itself is a badge of quality and reliability. If they offer you free and complete replacement in the 9th year before the ten-year warranty expectation, they are also putting extra chips on the roulette table, but they're banking on what they know -- not what they only wish for.

Let me add that Seasonic honors their warranties splendidly. They respond quickly, and the replacements are sure bets. Good reason why they actually provide the buyer with a PSU-testing plug for the main 24-pin (?) motherboard connector.

This is my own hypothesis at this point: there are several brands of power-supplies. But branding doesn't reliably predict "build" -- which manufacturer built it. I may not have kept up over the past four years or so, because computer builds are far and few between, I'm old and getting lazy. But Corsair, XFX, PCP&C, likely EVGA and others sell many re-badged Seasonics. PCP&C's "Silencer" line is a case in point. Rebadged or badged Seasonics have also proven in lab tests to sustain power reliability as much as 100W above their spec (query TechReport and some other sources).

Some PSU manufacturers ship product that won't even sustain their rated wattage.
 

jonnyGURU

Moderator <BR> Power Supplies
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Oct 30, 1999
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Are you trying to initiate a dialogue about PSU warranties?

This matter of warranties, for corporations attempting to cultivate a loyal customer base, and who as well would like to minimize the cost of RMAs and replacements, should be a matter of statistical quality control, testing, and knowledge of what percentage of a batch of product will fail before the warranty expiration.

There was once a rule of thumb that you could roughly gauge the quality of any PSU by picking it up. Those with short life expectancies or too-frequent failures will be light. Good PSUs are heavy. And of course this shakes out as discrete to this or that manufacturer, the quality of parts, etc.

That can be a rule of thumb for the less knowledgeable, or for someone who knows more. But with PSUs, the warranty itself is a badge of quality and reliability. If they offer you free and complete replacement in the 9th year before the ten-year warranty expectation, they are also putting extra chips on the roulette table, but they're banking on what they know -- not what they only wish for.

Let me add that Seasonic honors their warranties splendidly. They respond quickly, and the replacements are sure bets. Good reason why they actually provide the buyer with a PSU-testing plug for the main 24-pin (?) motherboard connector.

This is my own hypothesis at this point: there are several brands of power-supplies. But branding doesn't reliably predict "build" -- which manufacturer built it. I may not have kept up over the past four years or so, because computer builds are far and few between, I'm old and getting lazy. But Corsair, XFX, PCP&C, likely EVGA and others sell many re-badged Seasonics. PCP&C's "Silencer" line is a case in point. Rebadged or badged Seasonics have also proven in lab tests to sustain power reliability as much as 100W above their spec (query TechReport and some other sources).

Some PSU manufacturers ship product that won't even sustain their rated wattage.
I guess you don't know who I am. :D
 
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jonnyGURU

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But Corsair, XFX, PCP&C, likely EVGA and others sell many re-badged Seasonics.
FYI: Corsair no longer uses Seasonic. PCP&C is no longer around. EVGA has one offering made by Seasonic; the G6. In the grand scheme of things, most companies DO NOT use Seasonic as an OEM.
 
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GodisanAtheist

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Nov 16, 2006
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True. If it's an HX650 that's that old, that means it's probably the old Gold or Silver model at best. Which means it's archaic by today's standards. I've been doing this for 30+ years and I still don't know why people expect the PSU to last through half a dozen system upgrades.
- Bronze, actually.

I guess I should go shopping for a new PSU if jonnyguru is telling me I should get a new PSU.

Given GPU prices are still to rich for my blood, I think I'll do a system teardown and pick up a new case, PSU, and 240mm AIO cooler and rebuild to scratch the itch.
 

mindless1

Diamond Member
Aug 11, 2001
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The conservative answer is always going to be, get a new PSU. Same goes for your car, washing machine, stove... anything vital where you can't have downtime, but then where does it end? I keep an entire redundant 2nd system that I can get work done on, and if PSU fails, I have spares of those as well, but could get something delivered same day from Amazon too...

I just don't see that many PSU failures causing damage with modern, decent quality PSU, so I see a PSU like a jug of detergent with a finite use-lifespan. When it's used up, I get a new one and/or repair, but not before then. At the same time I'm not running a $1500 gaming rig, so there is cost vs liability to factor in too.
 
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DasFox

Diamond Member
Sep 4, 2003
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We all know these PSU come with long warranties, but you’ve certainly put some age on it.

I look at it like this, how valuable are all the parts worth that is hooked up? Consider that for any build now, and future, don’t skimp on the PSU, maybe don’t run it till it dies too, so it doesn’t possibly fry your box.

5 years is the longest I’ve kept a PSU...

Sure YMMV...

But is it worth the risk, that’s the question...
 

gdansk

Golden Member
Feb 8, 2011
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My brother is still using an old 550W Gold PSU I gave him. The warranty expires in 3 months, so it'll be 10 years old. Time flies.

I should tell him to replace it. But on the other hand I'm curious to see how long it goes...
 

BoomerD

No Lifer
Feb 26, 2006
59,124
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True. If it's an HX650 that's that old, that means it's probably the old Gold or Silver model at best. Which means it's archaic by today's standards. I've been doing this for 30+ years and I still don't know why people expect the PSU to last through half a dozen system upgrades.
Are you implying that the Corsair HX620 that was HIGHLY recommended by the folks at Jonnyguru.com at the time and I put into service in...2007(?) might not be up to the task after all these years?


Of course, it's in a PC that hasn't been plugged in for 2 years...but worked fine when it was. :D

I do have a Seasonic FOCUS GX-750, new in the box that I bought in 2019 when I found out my POS IBuyPower pre-built shipped with a CWT PSU...but it's been rock solid so far, so I've been lazy about making the change.
 

VirtualLarry

No Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
53,783
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Are you implying that the Corsair HX620 that was HIGHLY recommended by the folks at Jonnyguru.com at the time and I put into service in...2007(?) might not be up to the task after all these years?
If that turns your crank, I found in my closet, a PC Power & Cooling, Silencer 900W ATX PSU. Shrinkwrapped. In fire-engine Red. It's a museum-piece, I tell you.
 
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