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Looking for Drill Press - making lamps

ch33zw1z

Lifer
Nov 4, 2004
26,101
5,755
136
I'm interested in using some glass jugs to make lamps, and I would like to put 1/4" hole near the bottom of the bottles.

I've researched, and it appears a drill press is likely the best option.

I have a wooden jig that I kinda pieced together using some spare 2x4's. Bottles are about 6" wide.

My budget is about $150 or less.

Any recommendations are welcome. I've looked at these online, but will stop by the store to see them:




TIA
 

herm0016

Diamond Member
Feb 26, 2005
6,731
177
106
floor standing or bench top?

i have liked the wen branded stuff, but most of the tools in this catagory are going to be the same.
 

Greenman

Lifer
Oct 15, 1999
14,506
1,190
126
Seems like something that would be pretty easy with just a 3/8 drill and a diamond bit. But at $68 for a drill press ($68!) it seems like the way to go.
I would have expected a modest drill press to be a couple of hundred dollars.
 

ch33zw1z

Lifer
Nov 4, 2004
26,101
5,755
136
Seems like something that would be pretty easy with just a 3/8 drill and a diamond bit. But at $68 for a drill press ($68!) it seems like the way to go.
I would have expected a modest drill press to be a couple of hundred dollars.
It seems drilling bottles, the caution is to use lower rpm and light, even pressure, let the bit do alll the work.

To a seasoned driller, maybe easy, to a guy to works on technology for the most part, not something I wanna test out, especially if the press is that inexpensive.
 

Greenman

Lifer
Oct 15, 1999
14,506
1,190
126
It seems drilling bottles, the caution is to use lower rpm and light, even pressure, let the bit do alll the work.

To a seasoned driller, maybe easy, to a guy to works on technology for the most part, not something I wanna test out, especially if the press is that inexpensive.
Sensible approach. It goes without saying, but I'll say it anyway, get good safety glasses.
 
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ch33zw1z

Lifer
Nov 4, 2004
26,101
5,755
136
Are you looking to make this into a marketable hobby?
The thought crossed my mind. I'll have to see how it goes before I start commiting to a side job

A press won't go unused otherwise, my kids like to make stuff.

For the record, I'm a safety first nerd. They'll be weari g safety glasses as well
 

mindless1

Diamond Member
Aug 11, 2001
4,802
305
126
A cheap drill press is a lottery, one specimen may have off tolerance parts and excessive vibration or runout, and the next specimen from the same make and model could be fine, or have different off tolerance parts. This is especially true of harbor freight or other off brands.

If you intend to make other things then I would at least get a 10", with the largest motor you can find for the budget, though old timers will tell you that the best value and unit you'll get for that money is to scour craigslist regularly to find a deal on a used one when it pops up, but a high end brand, 12" or larger that normally costs in excess of $400, not a used cheap one, though that too can be a bargain if you can try it out before purchase and it doesn't suffer the vibration or runout issues.

If you want to get the cheapest thing from a local Harbor Freight, it could make sense to buy two of them, swap around the best parts from each to end up with one better press then return the other for a refund. They really can be that bad if you're picky and why not be? An off spec press can ruin work and break bits.
 

Greenman

Lifer
Oct 15, 1999
14,506
1,190
126
A cheap drill press is a lottery, one specimen may have off tolerance parts and excessive vibration or runout, and the next specimen from the same make and model could be fine, or have different off tolerance parts. This is especially true of harbor freight or other off brands.

If you intend to make other things then I would at least get a 10", with the largest motor you can find for the budget, though old timers will tell you that the best value and unit you'll get for that money is to scour craigslist regularly to find a deal on a used one when it pops up, but a high end brand, 12" or larger that normally costs in excess of $400, not a used cheap one, though that too can be a bargain if you can try it out before purchase and it doesn't suffer the vibration or runout issues.

If you want to get the cheapest thing from a local Harbor Freight, it could make sense to buy two of them, swap around the best parts from each to end up with one better press then return the other for a refund. They really can be that bad if you're picky and why not be? An off spec press can ruin work and break bits.
I completely disagree with the part swapping and return approach. This is theft, it also means that the next guy to get your returned drill is buying a machine that has to be sub standard, and may not have been reassembled properly.

When you buy a bottom end tool, expect bottom end performance. If you need a quality tool then buy a quality tool.
 

mindless1

Diamond Member
Aug 11, 2001
4,802
305
126
I completely disagree with the part swapping and return approach. This is theft,
Nope, more like self help. You are not ending up with any parts that were not intended for the product you purchased, nor ending up with some kind of upgraded product, just one that works properly.

it also means that the next guy to get your returned drill is buying a machine that has to be sub standard, and may not have been reassembled properly.
Wrong. If a product is returned due to defect, it should not be sold again, rather returned to the distributor or manufacturer to fix it, which is the ideal solution. Suggesting it "may not have been reassembled properly" is an arbitrary suggestion since it is far more likely it is assembled better than it came off the shelf - this IS Harbor Freight we're talking about, ever been there?

When you buy a bottom end tool, expect bottom end performance. If you need a quality tool then buy a quality tool.
Sure you are still getting a bottom end tool, but at least this gets one customer a properly working tool and bad parts sent back as they should be, instead of TWO drill pressed being rejected and sent back. You might say it's a win/win for everyone except that a customer should never have to resort to self help because a manufacturer couldn't be bothered to set better quality control standards.

"Bottom end performance" is not an excuse for anything to not be fit for purpose. If it makes you feel better to pay more for your tools, to some extent I do that too for piece of mind, but also because I've had too many misadventures trying tools from HF that were either complex assemblies or wall powered.

If you don't want to be bothered, sure, buy a more expensive drill press somewhere else. To get a decisive step up in quality you'll be looking at something closer to $200+, and that's still just entry level.

I welcome you to stand at the door of your local HF and police there in case you see someone coming in to buy two drill presses, then babble about parts switching and theft. ;)
 
Last edited:

herm0016

Diamond Member
Feb 26, 2005
6,731
177
106
for the record, the wen stuff seems to be the the highest "grade" or has the most QC out of the factory, most of the small stuff is built in the same place with different paint and labels.
 

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