Looking for a PC to replace MacBook

Photobug

Junior Member
Sep 17, 2013
15
2
71
My 2015 MacBook Pro just died. While I liked my MacBook for the photo video work I do, I am disappointed at the way it died and how difficult (impossible) it is to get repaired. I am considering going back to a Windows laptop to run Adobe Lightroom, Photoshop and Premier Pro.

I am considering a 2 in 1 as I think the format will work well for my style of use. I also think a 14" would be the sweet spot in size for screen size and hold-ability. The Lenovo C940 is the way I am leaning. The problem I have is the 14" model does not have discrete graphics. Will missing out on discrete graphics make a huge difference in performance? My primary use is for Lightroom, but my concern is Premier Pro will really suffer from the lack of a better GPU.

Here is the computer I am considering.


Would I have a huge performance boost with Premier Pro by upgrading to this model?


My wants are
Prefer 14" or smaller 2 in 1
Core i7 or better
16gb ram
512 or 1 TB ssd
USB 3.1 (gen2) or Thunderbolt 3
Discrete Graphics?

I would appreciate any other suggestions
 

Muadib

Lifer
May 30, 2000
16,012
233
106
Why aren't you fixing the MacBook? Apple would have no issues fixing it, but the price to do so could make it not worth doing.

Would I have a huge performance boost with Premier Pro by upgrading to this model?
Other than the larger screen, you can pick the same options for either model.
 

Steltek

Platinum Member
Mar 29, 2001
2,142
173
106
Why aren't you fixing the MacBook? Apple would have no issues fixing it, but the price to do so could make it not worth doing.
Against my better judgement, I tried to assist someone with getting one of those trashcan-imitation Mac Pros fixed once. Apple quoted almost 5 grand just for a new motherboard (which included both the CPU and memory, because - of course - Apple considers them a single unit even if there is nothing wrong with the existing CPU or memory and won't sell you just a system board). And, since it was out of warranty, they decided they couldn't give him what they call "return pricing" (their support gimmick requiring you to return the parts you are purchasing for a discount, the intent of which is to prevent Mac parts from being available to be sold on the open market). Without "return pricing" for parts, Apple essentially doubles the cost of every part they sell you. In the end, fixing his Mac Pro would have cost almost $450 more than to just buy a new Mac Pro outright. Which, Apple spent half of every call trying to convince him he needed to do.

Apple might make some good hardware, but as company their support policies would have made old line communists cry with joy.

In his case, after spending over a month fighting with Apple, the guy got so mad that he just pieced his Mac Pro and sold the parts. He then built himself a threadripper-based hackintosh that stomped anything Apple was selling into the mud for 1/3 of Apple's asking price. From what I understand, he is now done with Apple in whole and is in the process of transitioning all of his business Mac hardware to Windows and AMD-based systems.
 
Last edited:

Muadib

Lifer
May 30, 2000
16,012
233
106
Against my better judgement, I tried to assist someone with getting one of those trashcan-imitation Mac Pros fixed once. Apple quoted almost 5 grand just for a new motherboard (which included both the CPU and memory, because - of course - Apple considers them a single unit even if there is nothing wrong with the existing CPU or memory and won't sell you just a system board). And, since it was out of warranty, they decided they couldn't give him what they call "return pricing" (their support gimmick requiring you to return the parts you are purchasing for a discount, the intent of which is to prevent Mac parts from being available to be sold on the open market). Without "return pricing" for parts, Apple essentially doubles the cost of every part they sell you. In the end, fixing his Mac Pro would have cost almost $450 more than to just buy a new Mac Pro outright. Which, Apple spent half of every call trying to convince him he needed to do.

Apple might make some good hardware, but as company their support policies would have made old line communists cry with joy.

In his case, after spending over a month fighting with Apple, the guy got so mad that he just pieced his Mac Pro and sold the parts. He then built himself a threadripper-based hackintosh that stomped anything Apple was selling into the mud for 1/3 of Apple's asking price. From what I understand, he is now done with Apple in whole and is in the process of transitioning all of his business Mac hardware to Windows and AMD-based systems.
Maybe Apple is starting to learn from past mistakes. The new Mac Pro is quite upgradeable compared to the trash can. You can upgrade the CPU, memory and (I think, although I'm not sure.) GPU. It still costs an arm & leg though.
 

Steltek

Platinum Member
Mar 29, 2001
2,142
173
106
Maybe Apple is starting to learn from past mistakes. The new Mac Pro is quite upgradeable compared to the trash can. You can upgrade the CPU, memory and (I think, although I'm not sure.) GPU. It still costs an arm & leg though.
Yeah, I've heard that is the case. I generally never had a problem with the quality of their hardware (other than laptop keyboards) ;) . I don't use Apple stuff, but even so I admit they design some really nice hardware.

Problem is, being repairable doesn't help you if you can't actually convince them to sell you the parts you need to fix it (which, I guarantee you, hasn't changed).
 
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Muadib

Lifer
May 30, 2000
16,012
233
106
Yeah, I've heard that is the case. I generally never had a problem with the quality of their hardware (other than laptop keyboards) ;) . I don't use Apple stuff, but even so I admit they design some really nice hardware.

Problem is, being repairable doesn't help you if you can't actually convince them to sell you the parts you need to fix it (which, I guarantee you, hasn't changed).
I can't disagree with you there. :)
 

Shmee

Memory and Storage, Graphics Cards
Super Moderator
Sep 13, 2008
4,250
416
126
I would look at the Dell XPS line. They have some nice systems, and are generally easy to work on for most models. That or Dell Inspiron.
 
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fire400

Diamond Member
Nov 21, 2005
5,182
17
81
Given that you might be coming out of the Apple eco, there is an entire universe that has/have far transcended Apple in the business-consumer-enthusiast community.

If you're doing massive, macro processing on Adobe, even with +16K quality photos, wouldn't even consider a non-workstation laptop.
The U-series processors as of 2020, are still too stripped down compared to fuller-fledged i7H or Xeon mobile processors.

Option(s) to consider-
ThinkPad P1-gen2 (sleek chassis, excellent keyboard and flawless, 4K HDR/OLED [choice] display)

i7H-gen9 / Xeon mobile
64GB RAM upgradable
2x SSD options for RAID array, mission critical
Discrete nVidia graphics available

NBD-onsite support similar to Dell Premium and HP Elite products
 

Photobug

Junior Member
Sep 17, 2013
15
2
71
I am getting my MacBook repaired from a 3rd party vendor. It will have a new SSD and battery when done. I don't know that I trust it now though. I spend a lot of time on my laptop and feel the thing maybe worn out.

I am thinking a 2 in 1 as my walk around laptop and use my MacBook when I plan on working with photos or videos. For. workstation the Thinkpad P53 looks pretty sweet. The problem I have with a workstation computer is the battery life sucks. I am waiting to get m MBP back to see how it feels and if I can trust it again. I am hesitant to buy another Dell, my first laptop and windows computer was a Dell Inspiron circa 2003. It was kind of a piece of junk.
 

msbettyhunt

Junior Member
Oct 22, 2019
11
0
11
Against my better judgement, I tried to assist someone with getting one of those trashcan-imitation Mac Pros fixed once. Apple quoted almost 5 grand just for a new motherboard (which included both the CPU and memory, because - of course - Apple considers them a single unit even if there is nothing wrong with the existing CPU or memory and won't sell you just a system board). And, since it was out of warranty, they decided they couldn't give him what they call "return pricing" (their support gimmick requiring you to return the parts you are purchasing for a discount, the intent of which is to prevent Mac parts from being available to be sold on the open market). Without "return pricing" for parts, Apple essentially doubles the cost of every part they sell you. In the end, fixing his Mac Pro would have cost almost $450 more than to just buy a new Mac Pro outright. Which, Apple spent half of every call trying to convince him he needed to do.

Apple might make some good hardware, but as company their support policies would have made old line communists cry with joy.

In his case, after spending over a month fighting with Apple, the guy got so mad that he just pieced his Mac Pro and sold the parts. He then built himself a threadripper-based hackintosh that stomped anything Apple was selling into the mud for 1/3 of Apple's asking price. From what I understand, he is now done with Apple in whole and is in the process of transitioning all of his business Mac hardware to Windows and AMD-based systems.
Exactly.
 

Photobug

Junior Member
Sep 17, 2013
15
2
71
Why don't you go for Macbook Pro?
My last Macbook did not last long enough to rationalize the premium I paid. Not only did it fail it failed spectacularly. SSD failure. I just got it back after about $1000 in repairs. I will be using it for now but will likely compromise on a travel laptop and plan on using a newer desktop I just picked up.
 

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