Looking for a long 1/8 to 1/4 cable that is durable where the plugs join the cable as get frequently bent there.

Coyle

Member
May 15, 2020
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Hard to find these cables in at least 20ft length. Is for my child's headset so can sit on bed while watching shows (rooms is 10ft wall to wall.) Gets bent where 1/4 plug meets cable so need something durable there. Was thinking maybe wrap some electrical tape there to reduce flexing/breaking wires; but would prefer a more durable cable, any suggestions?
 

fire400

Diamond Member
Nov 21, 2005
5,204
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Search: trs livewire elite

Live Wire Elite series is top.
Used it for years, and never had it go out on me, lots of traveling and wire bending, in and out of mixers, and tossed around in crates and bags.
You can also reinforce the wire ends with zip ties (bend end and route in loop to prevent over-bending) coil springs and electrical tape for improved longevity.
 
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sdifox

No Lifer
Sep 30, 2005
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Coyle

Member
May 15, 2020
180
11
51
Search: trs livewire elite

Live Wire Elite series is top.
Used it for years, and never had it go out on me, lots of traveling and wire bending, in and out of mixers, and tossed around in crates and bags.
You can also reinforce the wire ends with zip ties (bend end and route in loop to prevent over-bending) coil springs and electrical tape for improved longevity.
I like the idea of using zip ties, but don't quite understand what you mean/how to do it, can you explain (I have a lot of 9" zips around, do you mean wrap it then come back to the beginning--female end--to finish?) Or some other way?
 

sdifox

No Lifer
Sep 30, 2005
88,663
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LikeLinus

Lifer
Jul 25, 2001
11,518
668
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Kids are very creating when it comes to breaking things. I have headsets older than my oldest kid but he has broken at least half a dozen headsets...
Oh, I know, believe me. I have two boys and they've done their fair share of accidental destruction, lol. Just offering some suggestions. There's not a lot of information on what is causing the problem, what devices and such. There may be a good way to zip-tie the actual cable to the device or something similar.
 

mindless1

Diamond Member
Aug 11, 2001
7,092
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You can reinforce an existing cable, make your own, or hunt down whatever seems best, but given enough stress on the cable, if the cable itself does not yield it may damage the component (socket) it is plugged into.

The more permanent solution is not a strain relief at the cable connector but rather to mechanically fix it in place a distance from the component it's plugged into and provide strain relief at that point, to protect both the cable and the equipment.

OR, educate the child on why it is breaking and next time it happens, the child does without using it for a while, and next time longer still, till the lesson is learned.

If none of that works for you, how about a wireless headset?
 

Coyle

Member
May 15, 2020
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Yes, I plan on going this route, thinking a right angle adapter plugged into the headphones for a breakaway point instead of using a right angle cable, then a straight cable into that so the cable goes forward rather than down, and just add some strain resistance at that point. Wondering if this cable will have decent strain resistance: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0885RJNKL/ref=ox_sc_saved_image_1?smid=A20J3ITGSOMSJG&psc=1
Then connected to the adapter: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000068O3N/ref=ox_sc_saved_image_2?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&psc=1
Was just thinking of adding a bit more strain resistance; guessing electrical tape would stiffen it up; was curious about your zip tie idea, but maybe it will be ok with the new setup.
 
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rickon66

Golden Member
Oct 11, 1999
1,823
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Use some heat shrink tubing to reinforce the problem area, slide it on and use a heat gun to shrink it down to a snug size.
 

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