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Life in prison after trying to steal hedge clippers

pauldun170

Diamond Member
Sep 26, 2011
6,862
1,980
136
Gonna toss this one in here
Life in prison after trying to steal hedge clippers

1979 - Age 21 - Tried to rob a cab driver - Sentenced to 10 years
1987 - Age 28 - Possession Stolen Property - In 1987, Bryant pleaded guilty to possession of stolen things over $500 after allegedly stealing “three televisions, a remote control and a robot” from a Radio Shack. Initially, Bryant had been charged with possession of stolen things greater than $100 and less than $500. But when prosecutors went back and checked the prices of the items at the time Bryant was alleged to have committed the theft — which was around Christmas — they determined that the value had been in fact over $500. Bryant was sentenced to two years in prison.
1989 - Age 31 - Attempted forgery of a $150 check
1992 - Age 33 - Burglary of a house
1997 - age 38 - Accused of illegally entering a storeroom of a carport in Shreveport in 1997. While inside of the space, he was confronted by the homeowner, but somehow was able to flee the scene of the crime. Bryant told the police that it was true that he had gone into the storeroom. His reason for the trespass was to look for a can of gas after his van broke down. He said that the clippers belonged to his wife.



I
n 2000, a panel of three judges on the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeal determined that because Bryant had already been incarcerated for much of his adult life up to that point, sending him to prison for the remainder of his life, until his eventual death, was not an inappropriate punishment for stealing a garden tool.

“Defendant has spent very little of his adult life outside of the criminal justice system,” the judges noted, and then went on to conclude that Bryant’s “litany of convictions and the brevity of the periods during which defendant was not in custody for a new offense is ample support for the sentence imposed in this case.”
 
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dainthomas

Lifer
Dec 7, 2004
13,748
1,883
126
Gotta prop up that for-profit prison system.

If they took those millions of dollars they pay incarcerating serial hedge clipper thieves and put it in education, maybe their state wouldn't be a complete fucking shithole.
 

pauldun170

Diamond Member
Sep 26, 2011
6,862
1,980
136
Too small to scam. Gotta steal billions if you wanna pay to play.

Dude seems non violent so far
Grow up poor and end up doing stupid things when young.
Get locked up.
Get out of jail with no skills and low prospect for work due to conviction.
Resort to petty theft (the comically cliched "grabbing things off the back of the truck") to survive.
Get locked up
Repeat cycle.
 

Jaskalas

Lifer
Jun 23, 2004
29,145
2,752
126
This is a case of our society failing.

Yes this man is a criminal. But why is he? Did he wake up one day and say to himself "Prison sure seems swell, I should go there!"? Of course not. A life of poverty and of struggle lead him to make those terrible choices. At face value we know he did those crimes, and we know that if we release him - he will no doubt commit further crime as is evidenced in his already established reoccurring pattern of behavior.

The trick is to solve this vicious cycle. And that starts by providing enough of an opportunity to lead a successful life after getting out of prison. Rather than being condemned for having a record, for not holding a job while in prison, etc. So many ways people are discriminated against once they are "in" the system. Everything our society does is geared towards keeping them there. Of !@#$ing on them when they try to do better. Of telling them "no, you do not belong in society".

Instead of rehab and recovery, we offer them cruelty and destitution. If they succeed in life it is IN SPITE of our best efforts as a society to thwart their good intentions.

With a fully funded and robust social safety net, we can prevent people from falling out of homes and into prisons. I believe we can break this cycle of poverty and incarceration. We just have to be willing to care for one another, to make the necessary changes, and to make the down payment for a better society. No nation should be kicking people when they are down - we need to lift them up and help them succeed so that we all benefit. We need to lead the way towards a better and safer future for all Americans.
 

nickqt

Diamond Member
Jan 15, 2015
5,512
3,289
136
This is a case of our society failing.

Yes this man is a criminal. But why is he? Did he wake up one day and say to himself "Prison sure seems swell, I should go there!"? Of course not. A life of poverty and of struggle lead him to make those terrible choices. At face value we know he did those crimes, and we know that if we release him - he will no doubt commit further crime as is evidenced in his already established reoccurring pattern of behavior.

The trick is to solve this vicious cycle. And that starts by providing enough of an opportunity to lead a successful life after getting out of prison. Rather than being condemned for having a record, for not holding a job while in prison, etc. So many ways people are discriminated against once they are "in" the system. Everything our society does is geared towards keeping them there. Of !@#$ing on them when they try to do better. Of telling them "no, you do not belong in society".

Instead of rehab and recovery, we offer them cruelty and destitution. If they succeed in life it is IN SPITE of our best efforts as a society to thwart their good intentions.

With a fully funded and robust social safety net, we can prevent people from falling out of homes and into prisons. I believe we can break this cycle of poverty and incarceration. We just have to be willing to care for one another, to make the necessary changes, and to make the down payment for a better society. No nation should be kicking people when they are down - we need to lift them up and help them succeed so that we all benefit. We need to lead the way towards a better and safer future for all Americans.
All of this may be true, and I agree with it.

The problem is, that might mean that our oligarchs would lose some political and financial leverage over us plebs, and that ain't happening.
 

Grey_Beard

Senior member
Sep 23, 2014
749
780
136
This is a case of our society failing.

Yes this man is a criminal. But why is he? Did he wake up one day and say to himself "Prison sure seems swell, I should go there!"? Of course not. A life of poverty and of struggle lead him to make those terrible choices. At face value we know he did those crimes, and we know that if we release him - he will no doubt commit further crime as is evidenced in his already established reoccurring pattern of behavior.

The trick is to solve this vicious cycle. And that starts by providing enough of an opportunity to lead a successful life after getting out of prison. Rather than being condemned for having a record, for not holding a job while in prison, etc. So many ways people are discriminated against once they are "in" the system. Everything our society does is geared towards keeping them there. Of !@#$ing on them when they try to do better. Of telling them "no, you do not belong in society".

Instead of rehab and recovery, we offer them cruelty and destitution. If they succeed in life it is IN SPITE of our best efforts as a society to thwart their good intentions.

With a fully funded and robust social safety net, we can prevent people from falling out of homes and into prisons. I believe we can break this cycle of poverty and incarceration. We just have to be willing to care for one another, to make the necessary changes, and to make the down payment for a better society. No nation should be kicking people when they are down - we need to lift them up and help them succeed so that we all benefit. We need to lead the way towards a better and safer future for all Americans.
All of this may be true, and I agree with it.

The problem is, that might mean that our oligarchs would lose some political and financial leverage over us plebs, and that ain't happening.
And if we put something like this in place, there may be fewer oligarchs to line the pockets of the Republicons to oppress the man. One cannot be an oligarch without their henchmen to assure the scam continues. A Mafia boss is useless if his organization does not have the ruthless guys who do the dirty work.
 

killster1

Diamond Member
Mar 15, 2007
5,390
264
126
This is a case of our society failing.

Yes this man is a criminal. But why is he? Did he wake up one day and say to himself "Prison sure seems swell, I should go there!"? Of course not. A life of poverty and of struggle lead him to make those terrible choices. At face value we know he did those crimes, and we know that if we release him - he will no doubt commit further crime as is evidenced in his already established reoccurring pattern of behavior.

The trick is to solve this vicious cycle. And that starts by providing enough of an opportunity to lead a successful life after getting out of prison. Rather than being condemned for having a record, for not holding a job while in prison, etc. So many ways people are discriminated against once they are "in" the system. Everything our society does is geared towards keeping them there. Of !@#$ing on them when they try to do better. Of telling them "no, you do not belong in society".

Instead of rehab and recovery, we offer them cruelty and destitution. If they succeed in life it is IN SPITE of our best efforts as a society to thwart their good intentions.

With a fully funded and robust social safety net, we can prevent people from falling out of homes and into prisons. I believe we can break this cycle of poverty and incarceration. We just have to be willing to care for one another, to make the necessary changes, and to make the down payment for a better society. No nation should be kicking people when they are down - we need to lift them up and help them succeed so that we all benefit. We need to lead the way towards a better and safer future for all Americans.
actually he very well might be happier in prison as all his needs will be met with out having to try. Obviously he has a problem with working like everyone else, and we should do what? educate him for a higher paying job so he wont be inclined to steal? Seems like it will just give people a reward for being bad. Anyone can get a job if they want it. You have to want help for it to work. You think we can fix mental illness? that would be my first wish. There are to many freedoms here.
 

killster1

Diamond Member
Mar 15, 2007
5,390
264
126
Is that true if you're an ex-felon?

Is that true, uh, right now?
YES ITS TRUE. do you want or need a job? i can get you one. sure it might not be something you like to do but its not as hard as you think. Even if you have gang tattoo's all over your face i got you covered.
 

skull

Platinum Member
Jun 5, 2000
2,119
281
126
Is that true if you're an ex-felon?

Is that true, uh, right now?
My girls spent two thirds of her adult life in prison, only been out 6 months from her last stint and has employment. Sure her job sucks but thats the price you pay, I have a record too and I'm doing well for myself.
 

nickqt

Diamond Member
Jan 15, 2015
5,512
3,289
136
YES ITS TRUE. do you want or need a job? i can get you one. sure it might not be something you like to do but its not as hard as you think. Even if you have gang tattoo's all over your face i got you covered.
My girls spent two thirds of her adult life in prison, only been out 6 months from her last stint and has employment. Sure her job sucks but thats the price you pay, I have a record too and I'm doing well for myself.
Unemployment is a hoax, just like Covid.

MAGA
 

FaaR

Golden Member
Dec 28, 2007
1,057
407
136
This is a case of our society failing.

Yes this man is a criminal. But why is he?
Conservative thought goes that criminals and poors are simply lesser people, and that's why they end up in prison. So no, society is not failing; this is simply a people problem, rather than a social/structural problem.
 

pauldun170

Diamond Member
Sep 26, 2011
6,862
1,980
136
Is that true if you're an ex-felon?

Is that true, uh, right now?
Depending on region, getting any job is tougher if your black.
Now add "felony conviction" to the list.
You might as well be walking around with a Biology degree from Liberty University.

Since context matters, lets see what it was like for this guy back when this stuff occured

1979 - 21 years old and black in Louisiana? Nuff said
1987 - Unemployment rate in Louisiana was at 13%. Unskilled Black man with a felony conviction hunting for a job to pay a living wage in Louisiana in 1987? Ok dokee
1989 - Unemployment was down a bit between 10% improving up to 6% towards the end of the year.
1993 - Unemployment was back up, heading to 8%

Be nice to hear from black folk who lived in Louisiana during those time periods.
I can only compare growing up in black communities in the north East during those time periods.
 

Jhhnn

No Lifer
Nov 11, 1999
60,350
12,324
136
Louisiana? They've been locking up black people forever since forever. Helps the rest of 'em remember to keep to their place, if you know what I mean. Angola prison is one of the largest employers in the state & a self supporting institution, as well. It's a lot like slavery for the inmates-

 

iRONic

Diamond Member
Jan 28, 2006
5,035
109
106
Too small to scam. Gotta steal billions if you wanna pay to play.

Dude seems non violent so far
They say that patriotism is the last refuge
To which a scoundrel clings
Steal a little and they throw you in jail
Steal a lot and they make you king

-Dylan
 
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Nov 8, 2012
16,910
3,118
126
Unemployment is a hoax, just like Covid.

MAGA
We get it, anyone that was imprisoned Is a useless piece of shit that should never be expected to have goals, personal responsibility, or any skills.

Soft bigotry of low expectations, etc.
 

skull

Platinum Member
Jun 5, 2000
2,119
281
126
I don't know if you guys are all just losers that suck welfare dry and stopped trying long ago and/or your all born rich college educated schmucks that think they know what its like to be poor.

When I caught my last felony during the great recession I got a job cleaning toilets at night, the owner of the business was a black felon who was still on parole after just doing two years in prison. The jobs are always out there for people like us its just if were willing to take them over slanging dope and stealing because those jobs suck and don't pay shit compared to crime. I've worked multiple factory/construction jobs with felons of every color. The jobs are always there because crimes easier and most people quit after a few weeks so its a revolving door of new faces. I finally decided to get my shit together stuck to cleaning toilets for min wage, got a better job that would take me for $10/hr, saved up my shitty job money and started my own business. The rest is a wrap the american dream is alive and well if you try. Same for that black felon I used to work for he started other business besides the cleaning business and is doing even better than me.

Sure the justice system is bullshit, the ~1.5 million people locked up on victimless crime like drugs is ridiculous, legalize it all, make the jobs legit. Being in the system certainly makes life harder but its not the end of the world. It is a mentality, I was stuck on that poor me I have a record, the systems built to keep me down, you have to be born rich, lifes too hard bullshit for years. Once I snapped out of it and realized I was the asshole holding me back life got a whole lot easier.
 
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ch33zw1z

Lifer
Nov 4, 2004
30,088
9,097
136
I don't know if you guys are all just losers that suck welfare dry and stopped trying long ago and/or your all born rich college educated schmucks that think they know what its like to be poor.

When I caught my last felony during the great recession I got a job cleaning toilets at night, the owner of the business was a black felon who was still on parole after just doing two years in prison. The jobs are always out there for people like us its just if were willing to take them over slanging dope and stealing because those jobs suck and don't pay shit compared to crime. I've worked multiple factory/construction jobs with felons of every color. The jobs are always there because crimes easier and most people quit after a few weeks so its a revolving door of new faces. I finally decided to get my shit together stuck to cleaning toilets for min wage, got a better job that would take me for $10/hr, saved up my shitty job money and started my own business. The rest is a wrap the american dream is alive and well if you try. Same for that black felon I used to work for he started other business besides the cleaning business and is doing even better than me.

Sure the justice system is bullshit, the ~1.5 million people locked up on victimless crime like drugs is ridiculous, legalize it all, make the jobs legit. Being in the system certainly makes life harder but its not the end of the world. It is a mentality, I was stuck on that poor me I have a record, the systems built to keep me down, you have to be born rich, lifes too hard bullshit for years. Once I snapped out of it and realized I was the asshole holding me back life got a whole lot easier.
You'd catch more flies with honey. All sorts of people groups could benefit from your underlying advice.
 

Jhhnn

No Lifer
Nov 11, 1999
60,350
12,324
136
Bootstraps are generally not well received here at ATPN. Well done scull.
Ugh. Skull is clearly exceptional. "Anybody can do it" isn't true in the first place & "Everybody can do it" is an outright lie.
 
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ch33zw1z

Lifer
Nov 4, 2004
30,088
9,097
136
Bootstraps are generally not well received here at ATPN. Well done scull.
Bootstraps is the Republican answer for whatever is ailing the American plebs. Of course, when a Republican stronghold industry like coal mining is at stake, we need broad government intervention.

Bootstraps, lol.

The clear hypocrisy of American politics is very well received.
 
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Torn Mind

Diamond Member
Nov 25, 2012
3,443
93
91
Rural Louisiana is better off without him.
Gotta prop up that for-profit prison system.

If they took those millions of dollars they pay incarcerating serial hedge clipper thieves and put it in education, maybe their state wouldn't be a complete fucking shithole.
He would then join one of the legit "thievery" occupations, such as real estate, construction, mechanic, etc. But he couldn't control himself, could he?

Hedge clippers have no resale value. It's isn't about survival, it's about just taking things.

If anything, chronic white boys and other races should be punished just as hard. The unrepentant will not reform, but merely readjust.
 

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