Lack of quality education in inner city public schools.

sygyzy

Lifer
Oct 21, 2000
14,001
4
76
You are doing research? For what? With only four choices, a poor OP, and a 1337 name like that, I don't know how seriously to take this topic.
 

S0Y73NTGR33N

Senior member
Sep 27, 2004
420
0
0
I'm an I/O Psychologist, this isn't serious research on here obviously... just browsing if someone has some ideas. Sometimes common sense is the best thing. When you're buried in papers you lose it... :confused:
 

FleshLight

Diamond Member
Mar 18, 2004
6,883
0
71
You forgot socioeconomic differences when compared to "quality educational institutes" which is the main reason.
 

S0Y73NTGR33N

Senior member
Sep 27, 2004
420
0
0
Originally posted by: FleshLight
You forgot socioeconomic differences when compared to "quality educational institutes" which is the main reason.

Why would socioeconomic differences apply to public schools. Richer families do go to private schools yes, but if it's a problem with funding of low socioeconomic areas with not enough money to provide for students, that is controlled by the government. If it's teachers not liking the "poor" students, it's either racism or the Teachers, depending on how you look at it.
 

SuperTool

Lifer
Jan 25, 2000
14,000
2
0
I went to an inner city public school, then an Ivy League school.
I had 36 AP credits going in and graduated in 3 years.
Thanks for playing.
 

S0Y73NTGR33N

Senior member
Sep 27, 2004
420
0
0
Originally posted by: SuperTool
I went to an inner city public school, then an Ivy League school.
I had 36 AP credits going in and graduated in 3 years.
Thanks for playing.

You are not the norm. You are a genius... good job dude.
 

SuperTool

Lifer
Jan 25, 2000
14,000
2
0
Originally posted by: S0Y73NTGR33N
Originally posted by: SuperTool
I went to an inner city public school, then an Ivy League school.
I had 36 AP credits going in and graduated in 3 years.
Thanks for playing.

You are not the norm. You are a genius... good job dude.

Well, it was out there for people to take advantage of. I had some great teachers.
 

S0Y73NTGR33N

Senior member
Sep 27, 2004
420
0
0
Originally posted by: Wahsapa
check this out click

i would say most definately its the school system

edit: also found this

Sorry but random percentages from "slashdot.org" don't mean jack. Get a credible source. And not FOXNEWS OR CNN THEY ARE BULL..... (most news is bull and political, find some educated stuff please)
 

Colt45

Lifer
Apr 18, 2001
19,721
1
0
A lot of inner city kids 'just dont give a fuck' more or less...


Edit:
forgot to mention.
the general lack of motivation in school, that a lot of inner city kids have is not necessarily related to intelligence.
 

Cerb

Elite Member
Aug 26, 2000
17,484
33
86
Genuine stupidity.
High % of good parents = good school system.
 

KK

Lifer
Jan 2, 2001
15,903
4
81
Originally posted by: SuperTool
Originally posted by: S0Y73NTGR33N
Originally posted by: SuperTool
I went to an inner city public school, then an Ivy League school.
I had 36 AP credits going in and graduated in 3 years.
Thanks for playing.

You are not the norm. You are a genius... good job dude.

Well, it was out there for people to take advantage of. I had some great teachers.

In your school, how were the other students, did they come from good backgrounds? I would think in most inner city schools you would have more students that come from crack houses/broken families and such than you would have in rural schools.
 

sygyzy

Lifer
Oct 21, 2000
14,001
4
76
Originally posted by: S0Y73NTGR33N
I'm an I/O Psychologist, this isn't serious research on here obviously... just browsing if someone has some ideas. Sometimes common sense is the best thing. When you're buried in papers you lose it... :confused:

I really was serious when I was asking what you are doing research for. It was not a rhetorical question or an attack. I want to know so people can help you.

I think one big reason is good teachers do not want to teach in the inner city. Why? At first everyone thought it was money. But they found out money is not the primary reason. They didn't feel like they had good leaders (principals) and support. If someone took the plunge, others would follow suit and the inner city would improve. Makes sense to me.
 

S0Y73NTGR33N

Senior member
Sep 27, 2004
420
0
0
Originally posted by: sygyzy
Originally posted by: S0Y73NTGR33N
I'm an I/O Psychologist, this isn't serious research on here obviously... just browsing if someone has some ideas. Sometimes common sense is the best thing. When you're buried in papers you lose it... :confused:

I really was serious when I was asking what you are doing research for. It was not a rhetorical question or an attack. I want to know so people can help you.

I think one big reason is good teachers do not want to teach in the inner city. Why? At first everyone thought it was money. But they found out money is not the primary reason. They didn't feel like they had good leaders (principals) and support. If someone took the plunge, others would follow suit and the inner city would improve. Makes sense to me.

Some of the stuff I am interested in is related to stereotype threats. Stuff like if they need to be implied, actual or even nonexistent to affect performance on standardized tests. The latest stuff is coming up as nonexistent. As in the test needs to show nothing different between test groups for the people to feel threat and be affected by it in their results.


This applies for
Women in math and sciences,
Men in English, Home EC.. ect..
Lower income families,
Minorities,
Possibly inner city students.

-green
 

MrCodeDude

Lifer
Jun 23, 2001
13,674
1
76
Originally posted by: SuperTool
I went to an inner city public school, then an Ivy League school.
I had 36 AP credits going in and graduated in 3 years.
Thanks for playing.
You must make pretty good money then. Ivy League education + Silicon Valley = $$?
 

SuperTool

Lifer
Jan 25, 2000
14,000
2
0
Originally posted by: KK
Originally posted by: SuperTool
Originally posted by: S0Y73NTGR33N
Originally posted by: SuperTool
I went to an inner city public school, then an Ivy League school.
I had 36 AP credits going in and graduated in 3 years.
Thanks for playing.

You are not the norm. You are a genius... good job dude.

Well, it was out there for people to take advantage of. I had some great teachers.

In your school, how were the other students, did they come from good backgrounds? I would think in most inner city schools you would have more students that come from crack houses/broken families and such than you would have in rural schools.

Yeah, lots of students with issues at home bringing them to school. Teachers spending too much time dealing with behavioral problems that should be dealt with at home. I guess it was kind of segregated in a way. Kids who wanted to learn had the good serious courses available to them, but those who didn't were in sh!tty classes where it was a circus. It was really what you made of it, but the contrast between making it and not was huge, and few did make it.
There are a lot of dedicated and great teachers teaching in inner city public schools, and they are often getting smeared as if they are the reason for poor student performance. Students come in to class with bad attitude, disrespectful of teachers, because they have bigger problems to worry about than failing a class. It's kind of hard to teach them much unless they want to learn.
 

Mucho

Guest
Oct 20, 2001
8,232
2
0
To me the biggest difference between inner city kids and suburban kids is the disproportion of single parent kids in the inner city. To me that is the root of the evil. My daughter a grade X11 student, told me last year 80% of the black kids in her school are from single parent families.
 

Nebor

Lifer
Jun 24, 2003
29,582
12
76
It's about money, plain and simple. Inner city kids don't have it. Neither do their schools.

I voted for the "general stupidity" because it was the funniest answer. That's why everyone else voted for it too. :thumbsup:
 

crobusa

Senior member
Oct 3, 2001
583
0
0
(WARNING: RANT)
Ok, so I attended the Chicago Public Schools for HS, and you learn real quickly what the differences are.

1. Don't want to be there.
From a Libertarian standpoint, when you force someone to do a job, they have no incentive to see that it's done properly. The drug dealing, the graffiti/destruction of books/property, the disrespect, all can be seen. So why is school is at best a day-care center, at worst a prison? We need to the youth locked up, before we have evidence they've done something wrong. (and we will) My high school was a holding pen, with guards at every exit, and this was the one of the best in Chicago. Why? The yuppies in Lincoln Park were scared of us. Closed-school, activities that cut lunch in half, all policies based on this one motive.
It actually makes beautiful logic in an Orwellian sense... Reform them before they get criminal records.

2. Racism
6 years later, I can still remember the black kid behind me in U.S. History. in the middle of the class.
"F*** ALL THE WHITE MOTHER******S" and when everyone was stunned by this outburst.. "KILL ALL THE WHITE MOTHER*******S"
What would you do as a white, male teacher? Ask the "student" to leave? Or continue the lesson, ignoring this attack on you? (He did the latter)

Racism is a two way street.. From going to an all white community, to such a horrid scene, I became very close to a racist. Cynicism, apathy, and misanthropy are the keys to surviving.

I could rant for hours on this, but I'd like to see initial reactions.. Apology to the mods.
 

crobusa

Senior member
Oct 3, 2001
583
0
0
A quick reply to the socioeconomic differences theory:
The impoverished need to mature socially and economicly MUCH faster than the well to do..
I've seen examples when poor and rich have very similar situations, where poor students commit crimes of necessity, "hustling" (read:steal, drug-deal) while better-off students commit crimes recreationally.

Our society has a much harder stance on property crime then minor drinking for example.