Info Keep your loved ones alive with olive oil

igor_kavinski

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Consumption of Olive Oil and Risk of Total and Cause-Specific Mortality Among U.S. Adults - ScienceDirect

Conclusions

Higher olive oil intake was associated with lower risk of total and cause-specific mortality. Replacing margarine, butter, mayonnaise, and dairy fat with olive oil was associated with lower risk of mortality.
Especially older people might benefit a lot. It could improve their quality of life considerably. Lower risk of mortality means that overall body and organ damage is reduced significantly.
 
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Torn Mind

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Olive oil's good but the premium is insane and most olive oil is adulterated. It's not supposed to taste like a mild vegetable oil.
 

igor_kavinski

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Extra virgin olive oil tastes pretty harsh on its way down the throat. I've read that it means it's pure.
 

guidryp

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Also note that this is an association study, not dietary intervention.

They are just looking at data from the Nurses’ Health Study, and Health Professionals Follow-up Study.

They just gave them food questionnaires once every 4 years. So what did you eat in the last 4 years?

Olive Oil has good propaganda for decades, so people who remember having it, are probably more health conscious in general, which can impact diet, exercise, weight management, not smoking, not drinking to excess.

Often food industry players pay to have data like this mined looking for positive associations...
 

crashtech

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Olive oil is good, but butter is probably not bad, and might be good. The old incorrect info about butter and saturated fats being the devil has been largely debunked but is taking a long time to die. I think butter in particular has gotten a bad rap vs nasty margarine. I'm not going to post links because there is a lot of readily avaialble info on the subject, as long as old results are filtered out.
 

guidryp

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Olive oil is good, but butter is probably not bad, and might be good. The old incorrect info about butter and saturated fats being the devil has been largely debunked but is taking a long time to die. I think butter in particular has gotten a bad rap vs nasty margarine. I'm not going to post links because there is a lot of readily avaialble info on the subject, as long as old results are filtered out.
No, butter didn't get a bad rap. The dairy industry just routinely funds bogus studies, to confuse the issue. Much like the Olive Oil industry funds studies like this one looking for good news.

Butter is large source of saturated fat.

Saturated Fat, raises LDL cholesterol (fact), it doesn't matter if that source is butter or coconut oil. It does the same thing. The higher your LDL, the worse your heart disease outcomes (fact).

Old Hard Margarine is also bad, because it's full of hydrogenated vegetable oil, which is effectively making an artificial saturated fat full of Trans Fats, also raises LDL, just like real saturated fat.
 

Torn Mind

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My version being fact based.
Not really. Stearic acid has clear cut, rock solid benefits in improving fat metabolism.

Fat is a problem because people eat foods that inhibits its catabolism.

Grass fed butter is a good supply of fat soluble vitamins; deprivation of such vitamins will cause such issues.

TG/HDL is a stronger risk factor than LDL alone.

Olive oil, when not adulterated, has certain anti-inflammatory chemicals to help the body.
 

igor_kavinski

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Saturated Fat, raises LDL cholesterol (fact), it doesn't matter if that source is butter or coconut oil. It does the same thing. The higher your LDL, the worse your heart disease outcomes (fact).
Can't say anything about butter (never been easy for me to find real butter. I refuse to use any packaged butter) but I can attest that virgin coconut oil can be pretty dangerous, if consumed at least a tablespoon twice a day. In just a month, it caused bleeding wounds on my leg where the skin just split up. Turned out the saturated fat in the coconut oil had clogged my leg arteries, affecting the blood supply. Complete abstinence for a few weeks healed everything completely. I was taking it for the good fats (MCTs which I find out later constitute just 10% of the total fat content of coconut oil). IF I ever try coconut oil again, it's gonna be an MCT supplement and I WILL tread carefully.
 
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pete6032

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Not really. Stearic acid has clear cut, rock solid benefits in improving fat metabolism.

Fat is a problem because people eat foods that inhibits its catabolism.

Grass fed butter is a good supply of fat soluble vitamins; deprivation of such vitamins will cause such issues.

TG/HDL is a stronger risk factor than LDL alone.

Olive oil, when not adulterated, has certain anti-inflammatory chemicals to help the body.
Yes but are the cheapest eggs less nutritious?
 

Torn Mind

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Yes but are the cheapest eggs less nutritious?

IIRC, you had an article in another thread and I had forgotten to respond to it.

Reading the article indicates the smaller brands tended to be more nutritious than big brands.

The average omega-3 is 0.13g vs 0.05g. The difference matters density-wise. Only takes 9-10 organics to reach 1g while it would take 20 "conventional" eggs based on their average.

Likewise, it only takes 3 small-farm organic eggs to reach 90 IUs of vitamin D versus 5 big brand organic eggs to reach about 100 IUs


Probably in winter, the gap in density is smaller.


The best ability is delectability. For me, a non-sweet/starch food without seasoning like salt triggering a desire to eat it is a rare thing, and not exactly expected since I habitually never ate the "cheap" version. Hated the taste and the smell; yes oyster sauce or soy sauce could make it palatable but since it is a fatty food, I'm not aching for more than 2. I probably ate 16 cheap eggs in my whole life, definitely no more than 1 a year at best, which would be 30 something.
 

mike8675309

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Nearly all the studies around extra virgin olive oil are done within populations of people that are also eating a diet primarily in whole vegetables. Most straight research into extra virgin olive oil finds it has a negative impact on postprandial endothelial function.

 
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Torn Mind

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Nearly all the studies around extra virgin olive oil are done within populations of people that are also eating a diet primarily in whole vegetables. Most straight research into extra virgin olive oil finds it has a negative impact on postprandial endothelial function.

Such an assertion seems not in line with the mainstream, such as the opening of the following:

Greger, at best, is just old obsoleted news.
At his worst, he's a vegan posing as a "fact-loving" doctor.
 

mike8675309

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Such an assertion seems not in line with the mainstream, such as the opening of the following:

Greger, at best, is just old obsoleted news.
At his worst, he's a vegan posing as a "fact-loving" doctor.
Greger's studies that he used for the video were about Artery Function with Olive Oil. The research calls out that prior work indicating extra virgin olive oil was protective didn't take into account the impact on artery function that the oil may participate in because such impact was reduced by the Mediterranean diet of those tested.

The study you presented Meda-Analysis that used many of the studies (not mainstream) did not focus and only touched on artery function, in which case it includes a discussion of the role that the Mediterranean diet plays in such. Instead, it focused on where Olive Oil is recommended and actually is a better oil than one that contains saturated fat. In fact using extra virgin olive oil in place of oils containing saturated fat is always a win.

My point and the point of the studies is not that extra virgin olive oil is bad for you. It's that treating extra virgin olive oil as a "health food" would be misunderstanding the research. Extra Virgin Olive oil is better than coconut oil, or butter, and when used over a salad full of vegetables is great. But using it to fry your chicken breast or steak isn't gaining you any health points. A particularly important point for anyone that survived a heart attack or has heart or cardiovascular problems.
 

Torn Mind

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Greger's studies that he used for the video were about Artery Function with Olive Oil. The research calls out that prior work indicating extra virgin olive oil was protective didn't take into account the impact on artery function that the oil may participate in because such impact was reduced by the Mediterranean diet of those tested.

The study you presented Meda-Analysis that used many of the studies (not mainstream) did not focus and only touched on artery function, in which case it includes a discussion of the role that the Mediterranean diet plays in such. Instead, it focused on where Olive Oil is recommended and actually is a better oil than one that contains saturated fat. In fact using extra virgin olive oil in place of oils containing saturated fat is always a win.

My point and the point of the studies is not that extra virgin olive oil is bad for you. It's that treating extra virgin olive oil as a "health food" would be misunderstanding the research. Extra Virgin Olive oil is better than coconut oil, or butter, and when used over a salad full of vegetables is great. But using it to fry your chicken breast or steak isn't gaining you any health points. A particularly important point for anyone that survived a heart attack or has heart or cardiovascular problems.
It is a "health food" precisely because ceterus paribus under a Mediterranean diet, there is an asssociation with superior metrics of HDL cholesterol. They also mention the lipid fraction of the oil may be beneficial for some of the health effects.

Furthermore there is a paragraph in the discussion:
The beneficial role of olive oil consumption is nowadays widely recognized, with the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) approving two health claims regarding olive oil (62). They suggest its use to replace saturated fats to keep normal blood cholesterol levels and protect blood lipids from oxidative stress, with the later effect to be achieved by olive oil polyphenols contained in a daily intake of 20 g of extra-virgin olive oil.
HDL is pretty important for cardiovascular function, given that TG/HDL ratio is a strong predictor of having a event, stronger than LDL alone.
It is from this basis where I used the term "mainstream" because government bodies are the the most conservative and cautious in ever approving or changing guidelines. They recognize the effects two effects, and the latter is the more compelling of the two, because they recognize that it is not merely the presence of lipids, but that the blood lipids are subject to oxidative stress, and they are convinced olive oil has a protective effect.

Also, cooking steak and chicken in EVOO is better(it may not taste better) because it's a more durable oil with natural nutrients and antioxidants. It is less damaging that using the more common vegetable oils.
 

mike8675309

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Again, virgin olive oil has a negative impact on endothelial function, as do most oils. endothelial function is a major concern for someone currently recovering from a heart attack or dealing with diet restrictions due to heart disease.
If your choice is virgin olive oil vs butter, then yes, go with virgin olive oil. But that doesn't make virgin olive oil a healthy food regardless of what government agencies say. They are looking at overall risk. And if the majority of their population is using butter and coconut oil, then sure, they're going to say use olive oil instead. Just that change could likely save lives. Yet that still doesn't make extra virgin olive oil a health food.
 
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Torn Mind

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Infantile sciences like nutrition sure has a way of making passionate fanatics. Usually, there's always a disaster or two that causes policy to evolve.

Vegan-biased arguments are usually dead on arrival.

Evidence to the contrary exists, such as the following double-blind RCT published just this year.


Highlights

  • The effects of the ingestion of olive oil on cardiovascular risk are controversial.

  • Adults at risk for Type 2 Diabetes received either high-polyphenolic extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) or a refined olive oil.

  • The ingestion of a single dose of 50mL (about 58.5g) of high-polyphenolic EVOO improved endothelial function.

  • No effects on blood pressure were observed following the ingestion of either oil.

  • The vascular effects of really ‘good’ olive oils are beneficial, while those of ‘bad’ olive oils are not.
Abstract
Background
Effects of olive oil on cardiovascular risk have been controversial. We compared the effects of high-polyphenolic extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) and refined olive oil without polyphenols on endothelial function (EF) in adults at risk for Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).
Methods
Randomized, controlled, double-blind, crossover trial of 20 adults (mean age 56.1 years; 10 women, 10 men) at risk for T2DM (i.e., as defined by either prediabetes or metabolic syndrome) assigned to one of two possible sequence permutations of two different single dose treatments (50 mL of high-polyphenolic EVOO or 50 mL of refined olive oil without polyphenols), with 1-week washout. Participants received their olive oils in a smoothie consisting of ½ cup frozen blueberries and 1 cup (8 oz) low-fat vanilla yogurt blended together. Primary outcome measure was EF measured as flow-mediated dilatation. Participants were evaluated before and 2 h after ingestion of their assigned olive oil treatment.
Results
EVOO acutely improved EF as compared to refined olive oil (1.2 ± 6.5% versus −3.6 ± 3.8%; p = 0.0086). No significant effects on systolic or diastolic blood pressure were observed.
Conclusions
High-polyphenolic EVOO acutely enhanced EF in the study cohort, whereas refined olive oil did not. Blood pressure effects were not observed. Reports on the vascular effects of olive oil ingestion should specify the characteristics of the oil.
 
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mike8675309

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Evidence to the contrary exists, such as the following double-blind RCT published just this year.

That study resulted in this statement:
EVOO acutely improved EF as compared to refined olive oil

Ok. So in our gold standard test, we compared this better thing against the bad thing, and look, the better thing is better. That doesn't make it best. It just makes it better. The ongoing efforts by industry and the media to conflate EVOO as healthy food puts people's lives at risk. On the scale of relative risk, yes refined oils are at higher risk than extra virgin olive oil. But that doesn't remove the risk that extra virgin olive oil poses. For a healthy human that risk is quite low. But for an unhealthy human, particularly one that recently had a heart attack, that risk could be tremendous.
 

Scarpozzi

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That study resulted in this statement:
EVOO acutely improved EF as compared to refined olive oil

Ok. So in our gold standard test, we compared this better thing against the bad thing, and look, the better thing is better. That doesn't make it best. It just makes it better. The ongoing efforts by industry and the media to conflate EVOO as healthy food puts people's lives at risk. On the scale of relative risk, yes refined oils are at higher risk than extra virgin olive oil. But that doesn't remove the risk that extra virgin olive oil poses. For a healthy human that risk is quite low. But for an unhealthy human, particularly one that recently had a heart attack, that risk could be tremendous.
My PCP always talks about a Mediterranean diet being a thing. EVOO is part of that, but so is seafood and fresh tomatoes, yada yada.

I believe olive oil can help grease your pipes and also help your joint health.

They say medium-chain fats like coconut oil are also good, however, because they bind to bad fats and draw them into your digestive tract to be expelled as waste. Moral of the story is that there are lots of studies to review and the EVOO market is huge.....as is the coconut oil market.

I buy EVOO from an oil importer for bread dipping...but get the more crude stuff from Walmart. I buy coconut milk from a can to use in curries....it has coconut oil/fat in it. I refuse to buy purified crap from health food stores.... moderation is the key to everything.

Cook real food that isn't super processed and exercise.
 

Hotrod2go

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In Australia, we have a supply of macadamia oil & that's my go too for good health. Being high in monounsaturated fat is nice too!
 

Muse

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Consumption of Olive Oil and Risk of Total and Cause-Specific Mortality Among U.S. Adults - ScienceDirect



Especially older people might benefit a lot. It could improve their quality of life considerably. Lower risk of mortality means that overall body and organ damage is reduced significantly.
I use olive oil exclusively and have for many years. I get the organic stuff at Costco. When making Asian stir fries I add a few drops of toasted sesame oil, other than that, all oil in my cooking is olive oil. I rarely use butter, even. I've been working on 1/4 pound chunk of butter for many months!

Oh, I've been having 0.50 ounce of cream cheese on my daily breakfast bagel, along with some carmelized onions (fried in olive oil, and stored in a bottle in the fridge).
 

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