Judgment

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
33,164
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I was making a note to myself and wondered... did I spell that right (I have a table of words whose spelling confuses me sometimes, I didn't go there, I did an online search and came up with this interesting result... some words have multiple spellings, alas):

Judgment (without the E) is a frequent spelling on British websites too. ... If you do a search for both spellings, you will find that judgment's lead over judgement isn't as it seems for web writing. Still, it is more common than judgement in all British writings. In American English, judgement is downright rare.

TBH, neither look right to me! :D
 

nakedfrog

No Lifer
Apr 3, 2001
53,765
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I wonder if we added extra letters just to differentiate American English, I seem to recall reading that's why we don't have a U in colour and things like that.
 
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dank69

Lifer
Oct 6, 2009
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OK, here's more:

Cancellation versus Cancelation. I believe the former is more common in the USA, the later in England and probably elsewhere as well.
Never forget that whatever they do in England does not matter. If it is different than it is in America it is wrong. They don't even speak our language correctly.
 
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Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
33,164
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Never forget that whatever they do in England does not matter. If it is different than it is in America it is wrong. They don't even speak our language correctly.
Actually I enjoy listening to English accents from outside the USA, particularly the ones from UK countries, and their former colonies, e.g. Australia, New Zealand, Africa, India even, which can border on difficult. I think there are regions in the UK proper that would be hard for me to comprehend just listening. Reading their writs can be amusing, even disconcerting. Colours, flavours, that sort of thing.

Flavor and flavour are different spellings of the same word. Flavor is the preferred spelling in the United States, while flavour is the preferred spelling throughout the rest of the English-speaking world.
 

BoomerD

No Lifer
Feb 26, 2006
58,708
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Never forget that whatever they do in England does not matter. If it is different than it is in America it is wrong. They don't even speak our language correctly.
Inorite? Fckn English sure fuck up the english language. Don't get me started on those Aussies, kiwis, or <<gasp> the Scots.o_O
 

nakedfrog

No Lifer
Apr 3, 2001
53,765
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Actually I enjoy listening to English accents from outside the USA, particularly the ones from UK countries, and their former colonies, e.g. Australia, New Zealand, Africa, India even, which can border on difficult. I think there are regions in the UK proper that would be hard for me to comprehend just listening. Reading their writs can be amusing, even disconcerting. Colours, flavours, that sort of thing.

Flavor and flavour are different spellings of the same word. Flavor is the preferred spelling in the United States, while flavour is the preferred spelling throughout the rest of the English-speaking world.
It's interesting to read early Terry Pratchett books, because they seem to retain more English flair (or maybe I have UK versions, not sure). Reading some of Neil Gaiman's notes, he talks about how they Americanize stuff in his books, some things minor, like they have drug store chains we don't have, so they update the name, but they also make more significant alterations to Americanize his novels.
 

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
33,164
5,074
126
It's interesting to read early Terry Pratchett books, because they seem to retain more English flair (or maybe I have UK versions, not sure). Reading some of Neil Gaiman's notes, he talks about how they Americanize stuff in his books, some things minor, like they have drug store chains we don't have, so they update the name, but they also make more significant alterations to Americanize his novels.
The best reading of English flair I've seen is in the writing of Viv Albertine (former lead guitarist of The Slits), namely her book:


I imagine you'd really enjoy that! ;) It's witty, succinct, to the point, a page turner. Take it from a guy who has a LOT of great books that he hasn't finished! I went through that like a hot knife through butter.

I checked it out of my library the other day (to revisit it) along with her other book, which is recently published:

 
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Leymenaide

Senior member
Feb 16, 2010
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Websters American Dictionary was a political statement. We are not Brits. He set the standard for American spelling and as you might have noticed very successful.
 

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
33,164
5,074
126
Websters American Dictionary was a political statement. We are not Brits. He set the standard for American spelling and as you might have noticed very successful.
I have the Webster's Collegiate right next to me, probably weighs 2-3lb. I rarely grab it, it's easier to look up words online... well, if I'm at a computer. Of course, I tend to stick with American English spelling, but it gets confusing sometimes, especially that Cancelled word. In America it seems that people haven't made up their mind on that one. There are a plethora of words with alternative spellings, alas. :rolleyes:

Speaking of which:

Plethora is usually written as a plethora of, and even though it is singular, it implies a plural. Because of this, plethora can take singular or plural verb depending on the context and the writer's disposition, being written as "a plethora of examples are" or "a plethora of examples is." :D

Then again there's this one that I think of from time to time:

I don't give a damn for a man that can only spell a word one way. - Mark Twain
 

Leymenaide

Senior member
Feb 16, 2010
737
358
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I have the Webster's Collegiate right next to me, probably weighs 2-3lb. I rarely grab it, it's easier to look up words online... well, if I'm at a computer. Of course, I tend to stick with American English spelling, but it gets confusing sometimes, especially that Cancelled word. In America it seems that people haven't made up their mind on that one. There are a plethora of words with alternative spellings, alas. :rolleyes:

Speaking of which:

Plethora is usually written as a plethora of, and even though it is singular, it implies a plural. Because of this, plethora can take singular or plural verb depending on the context and the writer's disposition, being written as "a plethora of examples are" or "a plethora of examples is." :D

Then again there's this one that I think of from time to time:

I don't give a damn for a man that can only spell a word one way. - Mark Twain
They forced Websters on us at school but on my desk is a first edition of American Heritage next to Chaucer's works in Middle English.
 

nakedfrog

No Lifer
Apr 3, 2001
53,765
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The best reading of English flair I've seen is in the writing of Viv Albertine (former lead guitarist of The Slits), namely her book:


I imagine you'd really enjoy that! ;) It's witty, succinct, to the point, a page turner. Take it from a guy who has a LOT of great books that he hasn't finished! I went through that like a hot knife through butter.

I checked it out of my library the other day (to revisit it) along with her other book, which is recently published:

It certainly does sound relevant to my interests. Looks like my local library has copies of both, in addition to the DVD "Here to be heard : the story of the Slits" :beercheers:
 
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Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
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It certainly does sound relevant to my interests. Looks like my local library has copies of both, in addition to the DVD "Here to be heard : the story of the Slits" :beercheers:
I saw them play once, during the 1980's at Aquatic Park Berkeley, CA, bunch of bands played outdoors. Probably a free concert.
 
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Charmonium

Diamond Member
May 15, 2015
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Never forget that whatever they do in England does not matter. If it is different than it is in America it is wrong. They don't even speak our language correctly.
Inorite? Fckn English sure fuck up the english language. Don't get me started on those Aussies, kiwis, or <<gasp> the Scots.o_O
It's possible to decode modern Scottish if well enunciated but still a challenge. But since that's likely to be the exception and besides all of odd pronunciations, there's also all of the colloquialisms. So if you want to hang with the junkies in Edinburgh, you're gonna need ESSL lessons (Eng. as a 2nd, 2nd lang.).

I'm sure I've told this story before. I had a prof from Oxford in law school. The course was Beowulf's influence on the law - I think. He had no discernable accent of any kind. One day I mentioned that to him and he said that was because he spoke English properly - or something similarly British. Maybe he was busting my chops but he never gave the impression as someone disposed to levity. And we're talking about an expert in medieval English lit. Draw your own conclusions.
 

Charmonium

Diamond Member
May 15, 2015
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I was making a note to myself and wondered... did I spell that right (I have a table of words whose spelling confuses me sometimes, I didn't go there, I did an online search and came up with this interesting result... some words have multiple spellings, alas):

Judgment (without the E) is a frequent spelling on British websites too. ... If you do a search for both spellings, you will find that judgment's lead over judgement isn't as it seems for web writing. Still, it is more common than judgement in all British writings. In American English, judgement is downright rare.

TBH, neither look right to me! :D

You have inspired me. ;)
 

Charmonium

Diamond Member
May 15, 2015
6,612
678
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"Earl grey" but "gray suit" - where's my f***ing colbert emoji. Come on guys. Long ago, a friend of a friend used to make his own, pixel-by-pixel.

Now I know some you geeks like to write your programs in assembler. So by comparison, how hard could this be? Plus, WE NEED THIS!!!
 

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
33,164
5,074
126
It certainly does sound relevant to my interests. Looks like my local library has copies of both, in addition to the DVD "Here to be heard : the story of the Slits" :beercheers:
Just checked and that DVD doc is at my local library and I put a hold on it!
 
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Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
33,164
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Gray & grey
Yeah, those drive me nuts.

Honestly, I was thinking before I posted this thread. Judgment Day is the stupidest expression. Absolutely bonkers, as if some horrible tribunal awaits us someday somewhere, just insane. It should be called Revelation, Awakening, Epiphany, The Great Realization, Ordination. Actually, I can't grasp the proper term, but it must be there.
 

Spacehead

Lifer
Jun 2, 2002
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Charmonium

Diamond Member
May 15, 2015
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Thank you Mr. Brian. I couldn't figure out how to dl so I got a plugin and snagged that one. Also, b-b-b-bookmarked.
 

nakedfrog

No Lifer
Apr 3, 2001
53,765
6,259
126
The best reading of English flair I've seen is in the writing of Viv Albertine (former lead guitarist of The Slits), namely her book:


I imagine you'd really enjoy that! ;) It's witty, succinct, to the point, a page turner. Take it from a guy who has a LOT of great books that he hasn't finished! I went through that like a hot knife through butter.

I checked it out of my library the other day (to revisit it) along with her other book, which is recently published:

Her first book was finally available as an ebook from the library yesterday (I'd placed a hold on it weeks ago), so I just started it last night. So far, definitely an enjoyable read :)
 
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