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Question Is Switch (and Vita and 3/DS) a brick when the battery fails?

Wolfpup

Member
Jan 25, 2006
151
1
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I like portables, and like a good chunk of Nintendo games, and my present circumstances make me think focusing on portables would be smart...

But I'm more concerned than ever that maybe I should quit buying anything for these as maybe they just stop working when the battery dies. I can't find anything definitive, but it sounds like without a functional battery, these things won't power on?

PSP and PS3 controllers bypass the battery so they still work even without it functional...but that's not the case for Switch/Vita/3/DS?

Gigantic design flaw if that's really true, and it means the library I'm amassing has a limited lifespan. Grr.

I've had this at the back of my mind for years, but a laptop that's not THAT old with an entirely dead (virtually unused) battery has me thinking I need to just quit buying games for them if this is true. The laptop just ignores the battery and works, like a PSP, but Switch may just be a brick...
 
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Steltek

Platinum Member
Mar 29, 2001
2,524
355
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Yeah, the battery is part of the charging system. As soon as it won't hold charge, the Switch will stop working even on the dock.

It looks like the battery should be decently easy to replace, at least according to the several youtube videos I watched (presuming you get the right screwdrivers and use a plastic pry on the battery, anyway).
 
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killster1

Diamond Member
Mar 15, 2007
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you can backup your saves, your games your account, just like if you drop it in water smash it etc, the battery is very easy to change, you seriously don' t replace the laptop battery when it fails you just turn it into a desktop? i understand both sides of serviceable parts. more room for user error with serviceable batteries.
 

Steltek

Platinum Member
Mar 29, 2001
2,524
355
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you can backup your saves, your games your account, just like if you drop it in water smash it etc, the battery is very easy to change, you seriously don' t replace the laptop battery when it fails you just turn it into a desktop? i understand both sides of serviceable parts. more room for user error with serviceable batteries.
I think his concern runs more to the cost of the games. If your laptop fails, you can transfer your games to a new one. If your Switch fails and can't be fixed, you have to buy new games as Nintendo will not allow you to transfer them to a new Switch console.
 
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killster1

Diamond Member
Mar 15, 2007
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I think his concern runs more to the cost of the games. If your laptop fails, you can transfer your games to a new one. If your Switch fails and can't be fixed, you have to buy new games as Nintendo will not allow you to transfer them to a new Switch console.
sounds so silly.. you are sure you cant use your old account on a new switch?

From the HOME Menu, select "System Settings" > "Users" > "Transfer Your User and Save Data." Select "Next," then "Next" again, then select "Target Console" to indicate that the content will be transferred to this console. Select "Sign in" and choose to sign in using your Nintendo Account e-mail address or sign-in ID.
 
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Steltek

Platinum Member
Mar 29, 2001
2,524
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sounds so silly.. you are sure you cant use your old account on a new switch?

From the HOME Menu, select "System Settings" > "Users" > "Transfer Your User and Save Data." Select "Next," then "Next" again, then select "Target Console" to indicate that the content will be transferred to this console. Select "Sign in" and choose to sign in using your Nintendo Account e-mail address or sign-in ID.
Actually, you are exactly right (as of mid/late 2018). You can also add the new Switch to your online Nintendo account, then designate the new Switch as your primary console and you are good to go for use of downloadable games and content.

What Are the Differences Between a Primary and Non-Primary Nintendo Switch Console?

How to Transfer Digital Games / Nintendo Accounts Between Nintendo Switch Consoles
 
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Wolfpup

Member
Jan 25, 2006
151
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Yeah, the battery is part of the charging system. As soon as it won't hold charge, the Switch will stop working even on the dock.

It looks like the battery should be decently easy to replace, at least according to the several youtube videos I watched (presuming you get the right screwdrivers and use a plastic pry on the battery, anyway).
UGH. I assume Switch Lite is the same way? I'm surprised this hasn't gotten any real coverage.

Intellectually I think this means I need to stop buying Switch games, even though I love portables and otherwise like the system. Naturally I didn't really start thinking of this seriously until AFTER I bought a pile of Switch games for Black Friday sales.

If this thing really bricks without a functional battery, I need to stop buying games for it, but DAMN that's hard for me :-/

I think his concern runs more to the cost of the games. If your laptop fails, you can transfer your games to a new one. If your Switch fails and can't be fixed, you have to buy new games as Nintendo will not allow you to transfer them to a new Switch console.
In this case my issue is I want to retain access to my (mostly physical) games indefinitely, not just for a short number of years before a battery fails. I own piles of games that I haven't played yet that are MUCH older than this laptop who's battery totally failed, which really made me start thinking about this more seriously.

It might not be an issue if Nintendo was serious about backwards compatibility, so a system 30 years from now would run Switch cartriges, but they're not.

I *think* in terms of the online store, that Switch works more "normally" now and that you can download and activate different systems now (finally, for the first time). I'm not 100% sure if you're covered if a an activated system dies so you can't deactivate it though. In the past Nintendo was HORRIBLE with this-I lost hundreds on games when my first Wii died, but I'm under the impression Switch finally works more like other platforms do.

But in this case I'm just realizing that if this thing won't work with a dead battery, then sooner or later it's a brick. 30 years from now they're all dead, but these things aren't even on the market for 10 years, and the battery in the laptop I'm mentioning is 100% dead in just 7 or so.
 

Steltek

Platinum Member
Mar 29, 2001
2,524
355
126
UGH. I assume Switch Lite is the same way? I'm surprised this hasn't gotten any real coverage.

Intellectually I think this means I need to stop buying Switch games, even though I love portables and otherwise like the system. Naturally I didn't really start thinking of this seriously until AFTER I bought a pile of Switch games for Black Friday sales.

If this thing really bricks without a functional battery, I need to stop buying games for it, but DAMN that's hard for me :-/



In this case my issue is I want to retain access to my (mostly physical) games indefinitely, not just for a short number of years before a battery fails. I own piles of games that I haven't played yet that are MUCH older than this laptop who's battery totally failed, which really made me start thinking about this more seriously.

It might not be an issue if Nintendo was serious about backwards compatibility, so a system 30 years from now would run Switch cartriges, but they're not.

I *think* in terms of the online store, that Switch works more "normally" now and that you can download and activate different systems now (finally, for the first time). I'm not 100% sure if you're covered if a an activated system dies so you can't deactivate it though. In the past Nintendo was HORRIBLE with this-I lost hundreds on games when my first Wii died, but I'm under the impression Switch finally works more like other platforms do.

But in this case I'm just realizing that if this thing won't work with a dead battery, then sooner or later it's a brick. 30 years from now they're all dead, but these things aren't even on the market for 10 years, and the battery in the laptop I'm mentioning is 100% dead in just 7 or so.
Making devices with non-replaceable batteries nothing more than an enforced form of planned obsolescence by the electronics industry. That piddly Switch console is nothing on a $1600 smartphone, but they now share that same "feature". From this point forward, probably every handheld console will have the same issue because the manufacturers have gotten away with doing it by making it the "new norm". You might as well get used to it, or just give up on handheld gaming systems altogether.

At least Nintendo made the thing easy to work on by anybody who knows how to use a screwdriver and pry bar. Had Microsoft or Apple made it, it would be glued together without a single screw in sight to make it un-repairable (something they too have gotten away with doing).
 
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killster1

Diamond Member
Mar 15, 2007
5,563
300
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UGH. I assume Switch Lite is the same way? I'm surprised this hasn't gotten any real coverage.

Intellectually I think this means I need to stop buying Switch games, even though I love portables and otherwise like the system. Naturally I didn't really start thinking of this seriously until AFTER I bought a pile of Switch games for Black Friday sales.

If this thing really bricks without a functional battery, I need to stop buying games for it, but DAMN that's hard for me :-/



In this case my issue is I want to retain access to my (mostly physical) games indefinitely, not just for a short number of years before a battery fails. I own piles of games that I haven't played yet that are MUCH older than this laptop who's battery totally failed, which really made me start thinking about this more seriously.

It might not be an issue if Nintendo was serious about backwards compatibility, so a system 30 years from now would run Switch cartriges, but they're not.

I *think* in terms of the online store, that Switch works more "normally" now and that you can download and activate different systems now (finally, for the first time). I'm not 100% sure if you're covered if a an activated system dies so you can't deactivate it though. In the past Nintendo was HORRIBLE with this-I lost hundreds on games when my first Wii died, but I'm under the impression Switch finally works more like other platforms do.

But in this case I'm just realizing that if this thing won't work with a dead battery, then sooner or later it's a brick. 30 years from now they're all dead, but these things aren't even on the market for 10 years, and the battery in the laptop I'm mentioning is 100% dead in just 7 or so.
yea ur right they should just put AA batteries in all devices right! maybe in 30 years AA will be illegal to use tho.. then what will we do! you seem so paranoid wanting to play a 30 year old game? WHY? are you 6 years old now? ;) i own two switch's and have yet to purchase a game yet, but im sure in a few years it will go to the pile of game systems i dont touch anymore like the 5 rgh xbox 360 i have with 300 games or the 4 xbox original i have with Every single game made, or the 2 wii with all the games or the 3 DS or DSLITE or 2 or 3 3ds's i have, or the 2 xbox1's too, we mostly just use PC now but i thought the switch would be fun for the car and every age group could get in on the fun so i got some. seriously they will make battery replacements for switch's for a lOng time im sure, or you can come up with some kinda adapter to run it from a diff power source.

i guess if your battery is dead you can still boot your switch and play it from power plug like you want. (at lease thtat is what i took away from the video)
 

Sonikku

Lifer
Jun 23, 2005
15,484
3,812
136
There have been times when I haven't played my Switch for a month and the battery is dead, when to my shock I'll plug it into the official charger and I still can't game on it. I end up having to charge it for roughly an hour before it will even stay on. While plugged in.
 

killster1

Diamond Member
Mar 15, 2007
5,563
300
126
There have been times when I haven't played my Switch for a month and the battery is dead, when to my shock I'll plug it into the official charger and I still can't game on it. I end up having to charge it for roughly an hour before it will even stay on. While plugged in.
i bet if you try the techniq in my youtube post it will work.. also in 30 years I bet they have switch emulators for those precious games you wish to preserve. (to the OP)
 

Wolfpup

Member
Jan 25, 2006
151
1
81
Making devices with non-replaceable batteries nothing more than an enforced form of planned obsolescence by the electronics industry. That piddly Switch console is nothing on a $1600 smartphone, but they now share that same "feature". From this point forward, probably every handheld console will have the same issue because the manufacturers have gotten away with doing it by making it the "new norm". You might as well get used to it, or just give up on handheld gaming systems altogether.

At least Nintendo made the thing easy to work on by anybody who knows how to use a screwdriver and pry bar. Had Microsoft or Apple made it, it would be glued together without a single screw in sight to make it un-repairable (something they too have gotten away with doing).
What really sucks is it's possible to at least design these things right where it still works even with a dead or missing battery. PSP is proof of that! The PS3 controller and I think PS4 also are proof of that.

It's not acceptable in phones and tablets (and even some laptops now!) either, but at least with like iOS and Android I'm not taking them seriously as a game platform. And Windows at least so far as great backwards compatibility. Switch/Vita/3/DS I'm buying dozens of expensive, real games with the idea I'm going to be able to play these in the future any time I (or anyone else) wants.

Ugh. I tried even contacting Nintendo, and of course got no answer.

UUUUGH. I REALLY want some of it's exclusives (Zelda! Metroid! Luigi's Mansion!), but at this point I guess I just stop buying games for it, maybe sell some of the non-exclusives and repurchase for Xbox.
 
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Fallen Kell

Diamond Member
Oct 9, 1999
5,448
147
106
Nintendo has been very good about keeping things like batteries replaceable on all their consoles. Yes, there are some screws involved, and yes, some of them are "security" screws, but that is all it is. Take a look on youtube and you will find teardowns and battery replacement videos. The switch is a heck of a lot easier to replace a battery on than say almost any smartphone made in the last 5 years (i.e. you don't have to deal with screwless chassis using plastic pop connectors that get brittle over time and are only really designed to be used 1 or 2 times without breaking, and there isn't glue/adhesive tape all over the underside of battery risking damaging the PCB when prying it off or needing to use a heatgun to melt, etc...). It is just a dozen or so screws and two cable connectors (one for disconnecting the SD card reader, the other to disconnect the battery itself).

In fact, here is a video for you since you seem to think it is so difficult:
 
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