Is Ryzen 3000 Ready?

Are you content with how your Ryzen 3000 based system is running?

  • There are showstoppers which make life very difficult/make me regret the purchase

    Votes: 6 12.8%
  • There are some issues I can live with

    Votes: 2 4.3%
  • There are small issues I can live with

    Votes: 13 27.7%
  • 100% satisfied

    Votes: 23 48.9%
  • Other situation (please leave a comment)

    Votes: 3 6.4%

  • Total voters
    47
Jan 12, 2019
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#1
I read r/AMD several times a week, and I'm kinda shocked by the number of issues that people are having with the new Ryzen CPUs. The most widespread ones are related to high (idle) voltages and temperatures. Is this a norm for AMD for a new launch? Did anything like that happen during the launch of the previous Ryzen CPUs?

Just in case, I'm not trolling or anything. I'm genuinely interested but at the moment I've put off my purchase because I don't want to be a beta tester. I want to build a system and forget.

Everything is perfect with Ryzen 3000 CPUs. Peace out. This topic might be safely deleted.
 
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Jan 28, 2017
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#2
By the time Ryzen 4000 launches.
Same thing that happened with Ryzen 1000, it became good when the Ryzen 2000 launched.
 

Vattila

Senior member
Oct 22, 2004
419
185
136
#3
If you are shocked — please take a breath and keep in mind that thousands and thousands of CPUs are sold, and that this is looking to be the biggest launch for AMD, in sales numbers, for quite some time, if not ever. So there is bound to be more activity in the community, and hence much more discussion, even about a single issue.

The idle power problem (aggressive boosting behaviour) is such an issue, and hopefully it will be sorted out shortly. As far as I know,. AMD support is aware and acting, and there is already a viable workaround.

Overall, I think AMD will have more satisfied customers than ever in its history. But if you are wary of running into technical issues, then it may be wise to wait a couple of weeks until the dust settles and pressing issues are fixed.
 

Markfw

CPU Moderator, VC&G Moderator, Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 16, 2002
18,178
2,133
136
#4
Well, I guess I am a beta tester, but so far the only issues I have are very minor, and I can wait weeks if not months for them all to be "perfect".
 

Vattila

Senior member
Oct 22, 2004
419
185
136
#5
Well, I guess I am a beta tester, but so far the only issues I have are very minor
Yeah. I am positive that AMD will have their most successful CPU series ever with Ryzen 3000. Zen 2 is a downright incredible engineering feat, delivering performance at amazing value. However, there's always improvement possible in product bring-up and the marketing department.
 
Jan 12, 2019
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106
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#6
If you are shocked — please take a breath and keep in mind that thousands and thousands of CPUs are sold, and that this is looking to be the biggest launch for AMD, in sales numbers, for quite some time, if not ever. So there is bound to be more activity in the community, and hence much more discussion, even about a single issue.

The idle power problem (aggressive boosting behaviour) is such an issue, and hopefully it will be sorted out shortly. As far as I know,. AMD support is aware and acting, and there is already a viable workaround.

Overall, I think AMD will have more satisfied customers than ever in its history. But if you are wary of running into technical issues, then it may be wise to wait a couple of weeks until the dust settles and pressing issues are fixed.
Intel Sandy Bridge was wildly successful and prompted a huge number of purchases, yet I don't remember any issues with this CPU family or any other Intel CPU family for that matter (though to be honest I haven't followed them closely). Everything just worked out of the box.

One particular concern is that in order to make a Ryzen 3000 CPU work correctly you even have to install a particular Windows power saving plan which sounds really odd. What about other OSes which are not officially supported by AMD? E.g. many flavours of BSD or even older versions of Linux, e.g. RHEL or Ubuntu LTS.
 

IEC

Super Moderator
Super Moderator
Jun 10, 2004
13,737
870
136
#7
Intel Sandy Bridge was wildly successful and prompted a huge number of purchases, yet I don't remember any issues with this CPU family or any other Intel CPU family for that matter (though to be honest I haven't followed them closely). Everything just worked out of the box.

One particular concern is that in order to make a Ryzen 3000 CPU work correctly you even have to install a particular Windows power saving plan which sounds really odd. What about other OSes which are not officially supported by AMD? E.g. many flavours of BSD or even older versions of Linux, e.g. RHEL or Ubuntu LTS.
X99...

Idle voltages and temps are fine if you run the CPU at stock settings and install the AMD chipset driver which installs the correct Ryzen power plans in Windows 10 by default. The reason for the chipset driver/power plans is to enable 1ms interval power state changes and get the full benefit of the power saving technology in the Zen 2 chip.

That said, if you're like a certain poster on this forum and give your CPU a manual OC and are supplying 1.4V+ on full AVX2 loads (apparently without even realizing it...) of course you will have thermal issues as well as degrade/kill your chip.
 
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IEC

Super Moderator
Super Moderator
Jun 10, 2004
13,737
870
136
#9
I'm pretty sure it wasn't a consumer platform for the masses.
Nowhere in your OP or in subsequent posts did you state that as a precondition.
 

Markfw

CPU Moderator, VC&G Moderator, Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 16, 2002
18,178
2,133
136
#10
I'm pretty sure it wasn't a consumer platform for the masses.
Well, check the thread "what controls turbp in Xeons" (or whatever the title) There are a LOT of people using x99
 
Jan 12, 2019
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#11
Nowhere in your OP or in subsequent posts did you state that as a precondition.
The only condition is that I don't want to buy a new platform with certain serious issues which have been overlooked by reviewers (I don't blame them since they had little time and also they are not home users, so probably they were not concerned). Also, I've been assembling PCs for over twenty years now and I don't remember having any similar issues whatsoever. I might have been lucky ;-)

Anyways, the issue is when and if I can buy a new Ryzen system and not having to worry about anything.
 

Ajay

Diamond Member
Jan 8, 2001
5,308
261
136
#12
The only condition is that I don't want to buy a new platform with certain serious issues which have been overlooked by reviewers (I don't blame them since they had little time and also they are not home users, so probably they were not concerned). Also, I've been assembling PCs for over twenty years now and I don't remember having any similar issues whatsoever. I might have been lucky ;-)

Anyways, the issue is when and if I can buy a new Ryzen system and not having to worry about anything.
Wait three months and take another look. Being an early adopter means accepting some risk that there will be problems (the right ram, with the right board, with the right bios, etc.). Seems a bit like the x570 motherboards out there are really version 0.9 instead of 1.0. How much to you want a new system?
 
Nov 18, 2009
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www.teraknor.net
#13
Intel Sandy Bridge was wildly successful and prompted a huge number of purchases, yet I don't remember any issues with this CPU family or any other Intel CPU family for that matter (though to be honest I haven't followed them closely). Everything just worked out of the box.

One particular concern is that in order to make a Ryzen 3000 CPU work correctly you even have to install a particular Windows power saving plan which sounds really odd. What about other OSes which are not officially supported by AMD? E.g. many flavours of BSD or even older versions of Linux, e.g. RHEL or Ubuntu LTS.
Oh there was certainly a pretty big problem with the Sandy Bridge launch. The big SATA controller fiasco. It happens to everyone. I think AMD is doing pretty well with this launch and honestly the extended socket compatibility is kinda hurting them. It certainly has its pros and cons but Intel has a lot less launch problems because they simply don't care about supporting newer CPUs on older platforms -- not to say that having backwards compatibility with sockets is a bad thing but it certainly makes things a LOT more difficult. I mean honestly CPU's running a bit warm at idle is a minor issue, it doesn't actually affect anything, and doesn't even seem to be happening to everyone.
 
Jan 12, 2019
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#14
Oh there was certainly a pretty big problem with the Sandy Bridge launch. The big SATA controller fiasco. It happens to everyone. I think AMD is doing pretty well with this launch and honestly the extended socket compatibility is kinda hurting them. It certainly has its pros and cons but Intel has a lot less launch problems because they simply don't care about supporting newer CPUs on older platforms -- not to say that having backwards compatibility with sockets is a bad thing but it certainly makes things a LOT more difficult. I mean honestly CPU's running a bit warm at idle is a minor issue, it doesn't actually affect anything, and doesn't even seem to be happening to everyone.
"A bit warm" sounds like an understatement. I have yet to see a single person whose Ryzen 3000 CPU runs below 45C at idle with an air cooler. Most modern consumer Intel CPUs run slightly above the room temperature under the same cooling. Also motherboards based on the X570 chipset are not immune to any of the known issues, so the compatibility angle doesn't work in this case. The whole platform feels rushed and incomplete at the moment (two weeks after it was released).

I'm perfectly aware of the SATA controller fiasco which cost Intel a billion dollars (my etailer swapped my motherboard for free) but it was an isolated issue and it had nothing to do with Intel CPUs.

Wait three months and take another look. Being an early adopter means accepting some risk that there will be problems (the right ram, with the right board, with the right bios, etc.). Seems a bit like the x570 motherboards out there are really version 0.9 instead of 1.0. How much to you want a new system?
Exactly what I've been thinking. Gonna wait for a few months before the issues have been ironed out.
 

scannall

Golden Member
Jan 1, 2012
1,418
263
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#15
Eh, Intel hasn't had anything new since 2015. So their BIOS should be well tuned by now. X58 was a dreadful release for example. Took them months to get that sorted.
 
Nov 18, 2009
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www.teraknor.net
#16
"A bit warm" sounds like an understatement. I have yet to see a single person whose Ryzen 3000 CPU runs below 45C at idle with an air cooler. Most modern consumer Intel CPUs run slightly above the room temperature under the same cooling. Also motherboards based on the X570 chipset are not immune to any of the known issues, so the compatibility angle doesn't work in this case. The whole platform feels rushed and incomplete at the moment (two weeks after it was released).
Yeah you're right that the warm idle issue happens on X570 as well -- but still it doesn't matter -- it does not actually affect anything. It will get fixed eventually I'm sure.

I'm perfectly aware of the SATA controller fiasco which cost Intel a billion dollars (my etailer swapped my motherboard for free) but it was an isolated issue and it had nothing to do with Intel CPUs.
Yeah but it had to do with that launch so it's perfectly valid comparison AND in that case it was much worse because you could have ended up with dead SATA ports, actual hardware damage.
 
Oct 27, 2006
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#17
I had a 3600 die on me within a day (stock settings). Was able to get it swapped, and the replacement is a little warm with the stock cooler, but totally manageable with one of my old 212 evos. It freezes up if I apply XMP profile with 3200 Bdie, but if I manually set 3000Mhz it's fine. Personally it's been way jankier than my experience with multiple Zen+ builds.
 
Nov 3, 2004
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#18
"A bit warm" sounds like an understatement. I have yet to see a single person whose Ryzen 3000 CPU runs below 45C at idle with an air cooler. Most modern consumer Intel CPUs run slightly above the room temperature under the same cooling.
I don't really get the issue. You'd certainly prefer chips to run as cool as possible all else being equal, but if the chips perform as well as advertised within power consumption specs, then what is the issue? Let's say Ryzen 3000 chips will always run warmer than Intel chips. So what?

Also, I've been assembling PCs for over twenty years now and I don't remember having any similar issues whatsoever. I might have been lucky ;-)
You're comparing your own personal past experiences with an n=1 with bug reports from a large population of users which, due to reporting bias, is going to appear be enriched for these kind of bugs. The Ryzen 3000 series may very well have more issues than typical. Personally, I've been very happy with my MSI B450 board flashed to the latest BIOS to accomodate my 3600, but it certainly doesn't mean that it's a perfect launch. In fact, frequenting r/amd myself, it seems most of the voltage/temp issues are really muchado about nothing and moreso to do with enthusiasts trying to overmonitor every little detail. Could be smoother, but doesn't really seem like a big deal
 
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Aug 25, 2001
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#21
Mine just "puked" a moment ago. Monitor suddenly goes blank, in the middle of scrolling, USB wired keyboard and mouse lights go off, cannot even use hardware RESET button, have to force power-off. Power-on, all is fine and dandy again.

I am using 3600 RAM, and had my FCLK set to 1800 to match, so there's that, and of course, the fixed 4000Mhz OC, using a middling voltage that stock uses too, so I don't really see the problem with that.

Are we as end-users expecting too much? Spoiled by Intel platforms, where the "max turbo" is generally easily achievable as an all-core speed, with the right motherboard (Z390, or other overclocking-capable chipset), and sufficient cooling (which, with certain Intel CPUs, meant de-lidding as well).

As opposed to AMD's Zen2 platform, where "max boost" is rarely, if ever, achievable in the Real World, and heaven help you if you want a true all-core OC, running AVX2 loads. Time to underclock, to prevent screen black-outs.

Anyways, I'm back down to stock settings, except for setting XMP (DDR4-3600), not going to even adjust FCLK (defaults to 1600, so mis-matched with DRAM right now). I want to see if I get "black outs" with these settings. If I do, I might ring AMD for an RMA. Or try my luck with a 3700X next month instead.

Edit: This is all under 240mm AIO WC, and I've had the A/C going (recently cleaned my A/C, so it's actually nice and chilly in here now).

Edit: Running 12 threads of PrimeGrid PPS LLR, at "stock" CPU settings, HWMonitor is reporting my Vcore at 1.384-1.395. That's at stock. CPU speed is roughly 3.917Ghz. So not too far off from my fixed manual 4.000Ghz 1.365V manual OC. If anything, I wasn't giving it quite enough voltage, and that's why I got the blank-screen / "puke" symptoms twice thus far.
 
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Insert_Nickname

Diamond Member
May 6, 2012
3,609
142
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#22
OP, you seem to have made up your mind. But there are a few things I have to debunk...

Everything just worked out of the box.
Ryzen user since day 1. Literally. Bought my 1700 + Crosshair VI on launch day. Worked perfectly out of the box. Even with immature AGESA, it was 100% stable at stock.

Only issue was, and still is, the early 1000-series is fussy about memory compatibility. But again, this is only related to OC. Ryzen has always been rock solid at stock settings.

"A bit warm" sounds like an understatement. I have yet to see a single person whose Ryzen 3000 CPU runs below 45C at idle with an air cooler.
My new 3600 idles at 35-38C. Using an el cheapo Arctic Freezer 34CO with old fashion Arctic Silver 5. So here's one...
 
Aug 25, 2001
44,463
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#23
My new 3600 idles at 35-38C.
HOW????

What AGESA are you running and what board? My idle has not been below 56C at stock CPU settings. Although, with the fixed manual OC, and not crunching, I've been as low as 40-44C at idle. But not with stock CPU settings, which punches up the clock to 4.2Ghz and 1.45V+ at idle.
 
Jan 12, 2019
98
106
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#24
HOW????

What AGESA are you running and what board? My idle has not been below 56C at stock CPU settings. Although, with the fixed manual OC, and not crunching, I've been as low as 40-44C at idle. But not with stock CPU settings, which punches up the clock to 4.2Ghz and 1.45V+ at idle.
There's a new investigation on r/AMD:

https://www.reddit.com/r/Amd/comments/ch1kkl
Might be worth looking into.
 

Insert_Nickname

Diamond Member
May 6, 2012
3,609
142
126
#25
HOW????

What AGESA are you running and what board?
Asus B450-E with BIOS 2501 (latest), AGESA ComboAM4 1.0.0.2

I'd love to attach a screenshot, but something seems to go wrong today.

My idle has not been below 56C at stock CPU settings. Although, with the fixed manual OC, and not crunching, I've been as low as 40-44C at idle. But not with stock CPU settings, which punches up the clock to 4.2Ghz and 1.45V+ at idle.
I'm not going to try speculating on what's happening here. What are your temps if you load defaults/completely reset the BIOS? As in everything on Auto?
 


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