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Is Rush Limbaugh a racist too? UPDATE: Fatboy resigns from ESPN!

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CADsortaGUY

Lifer
Oct 19, 2001
25,162
1
76
www.ShawCAD.com
Originally posted by: BOBDN
Limbaugh publicly spoke a long held private belief among his demographic and others that in order for non-whites to succeed they need some handicap given them.

That's why it was racist and anyone else who believes such gargabe is a racist right along with Limpbaugh.
No - It isn't "racist" in ANY way.

I believe that people should be judged on MERIT and acheivement - not skin color. AA or any other programs which "help" "minorities" are the racist ones. To think that one race needs "help" to be as "successful" as another is blatantly racist - which AA is. Rush doesn't agree with, as you say, "handicaping". If you think that - you are very much misinformed about Rush. You should listen to him talk about this tommorow as he isn't behind the golden EIB microphone today because he is giving the keynote address to some conference today;) I'll be willing to bet over half of his show tommorow will address this fake "race" firestorm. Tom Sullivan is on today though, but I'm sure you could learn a bit from him though too.

CkG
 

shiner

Lifer
Jul 18, 2000
17,117
0
0
Originally posted by: BOBDN
Originally posted by: shinerburke
For those that want to claim McNabb is a superstar let's compare some stats.

Donovan McNabb

Jay Fiedler

Now....which one of those guys has a higher QB rating? Why isn't Fiedler considered a superstar QB? They have both been starting almost the same number of games, 58 to 57, but one is considered an all star while the other is heavily criticized for his play. Double Standard? I think so...
Dude, are you reading the same stats as I am? Unless I have them backwards (and I don't, I double checked) McNabb crushes Fiedler every year in just about every stat. This year McNabb had a poor start and he still isn't far behind Fiedler.

You are obviously a Rush listener. Or should I say were a Rush listener?

Limbaugh publicly spoke a long held private belief among his demographic and others that in order for non-whites to succeed they need some handicap given them.

That's why it was racist and anyone else who believes such gargabe is a racist right along with Limpbaugh.
Look at the career stats....

Fiedler

Games Played: 58
Passing Yards: 8984
Passing Touchdowns: 55
Interceptions: 49
QB Rating: 79.7


McNabb

Games Played: 57
Passing Yards: 10341
Passing Touchdowns: 71
Interceptions: 41
QB Rating: 77.5

Not much of a difference really....yet one is considered a superstar and the other is constantly dogged in the press.

 

BaliBabyDoc

Lifer
Jan 20, 2001
10,737
0
0
To date, McNabb has produced 10% more yards, 15% more TDs, 20% fewer interceptions and of course the team achievements of Eagles compared to Fiedler's teams. I do believe Fiedler's official rookie year was 1994 (although he didn't get official NFL time until 1998) . . . McNabb was a high school senior.
 

gistech1978

Diamond Member
Aug 30, 2002
5,047
0
0
put up some rushing stats
then we will see who is the better QB.
my bet would be that mcnabb has just a few more???? maybe?

did it occur to you that miami has ricky williams?

a legitimate RB, not one of the numbskulls philly has in their backfield?

they are not equal QBs, the scale obviously tilts towards mcnabb.

what about the most important stat of all.....winning % of the two QB's?
 

Red Dawn

Elite Member
Jun 4, 2001
57,551
2
0
www.salon.com/news/sports/col/kaufman/2003/10/02/thursday2/?*

By King Kaufman

Oct. 2, 2003 | The Rush Limbaugh era is over at ESPN. It was exactly what any thinking person knew it would be: nasty, brutish and short. It goosed ratings for "Sunday NFL Countdown" by 10 percent while offending legions of viewers, not just with Limbaugh's right-wing politics but with his ignorance about the game and its players.

The creation of the Rush Limbaugh era was a move of astonishing cynicism by ESPN, a race down the low road in search of a buck or two, middle finger extended out the driver's side window at its best customers, hardcore sports fans. Knowing that any publicity is good publicity and that hiring Limbaugh would have tongues wagging, the network hired him knowing he'd add nothing to viewers' enjoyment of the games but plenty to the bottom line as the curious tuned in to see how Rush would try to shape the events on the field to fit his know-nothing political agenda.

Time and again in his brief, idiotic tenure Limbaugh returned to one of his favorite themes, the liberal media, sometimes imagined as an unthinking horde marching in lockstep, sometimes as individual reporters, legions of them, all acting in exactly the same way for some reason that's obvious to Rush if not to the rest of us.

Bill Parcells' reputation as a great coach won't suffer even if he fails in Dallas, Limbaugh said, because reporters idolize him and love that he returns their calls. Jeremy Shockey has gotten so much attention, he said, because New York sportswriters have had no great football players to write about for decades, so they've gone gaga for him. And so on.

Limbaugh was working this angle Sunday when he made the comments that cut his football career short. He said that Eagles quarterback Donovan McNabb, off to a rough start this year, had actually never been that good in the first place. The three-time Pro Bowler who was having an MVP-type season last year before he got hurt had been overrated by the media in a sort of affirmative action move: "I think what we've had here is a little social concern in the NFL," Limbaugh said. "The media has been very desirous that a black quarterback do well. There is a little hope invested in McNabb, and he got a lot of credit for the performance of this team that he didn't deserve."

It took a few days, but by Wednesday there was a wave of outrage at Limbaugh's race-baiting. Democratic presidential candidates faxed out their tsk-tsks and demands for Limbaugh's head, including Howard Dean, who hilariously proclaimed, "Rush Limbaugh's comment this week about Philadelphia Jets quarterback Donovan McNabb is unacceptable." The governor really kicked a touchdown with that one.

Late Wednesday night, Limbaugh announced that he was resigning from the show, saying in a statement that while his comments were not racially motivated, they had "caused discomfort to the crew, which I regret."

As dumb and offensive as Limbaugh's comments were, suggesting that a successful quarterback has seemed successful only because of racially motivated special media treatment, they didn't seem outrageous enough to get Limbaugh fired. They were pretty much run-of-the-mill Rush, exactly the kind of thing ESPN knew it was getting when it signed him up. ESPN wasn't after cogent analysis of the Xs and Os when it brought Limbaugh aboard. It was hoping he'd generate controversy, publicity and ratings. ESPN wanted people with no interest in football to tune in to its Sunday show. Screw the core audience, the football fans. They'll tune in anyway.

And those non-fans must have tuned in. The show's rating climbed 10 percent, from 2.0 to 2.2.

Considering those robust numbers, it's hard to picture the fairly mild media pressure that's been applied to ESPN this week being sufficient to oust Limbaugh. I'm guessing there was significant rank-and-file anger in Bristol, Conn., the network's home, that made his position untenable. He hinted at that in his resignation statement by referring to causing "discomfort to the crew." (Or perhaps the quick surrender had something to do with the investigation into illegal drug use by Limbaugh that was reported in Thursday's New York Daily News.)

Perhaps all or some of his fellow "Countdown" panelists, Michael Irvin, Tom Jackson and Steve Young, all former players, the first two African-American, refused to work with him anymore. Jackson looked stunned as Limbaugh was saying his piece about McNabb Sunday, though he and Young both argued only with Limbaugh's assessment of McNabb as a player, not with the racial element of his comments.

ESPN devoted the first several minutes of its post-baseball "SportsCenter" early Thursday morning to pretending to cover the Limbaugh resignation story, anchors Steve Levy and Linda Cohn affecting their best serious newsperson voices. But they neglected to mention anything about the situation in their own building, where the story was. There were no interviews with Jackson, Irvin or Young, though presumably ESPN shouldn't have had trouble gaining access to those fellows.

Instead, the report showed a long, long series of clips from McNabb's news conference, at which he basically said that Limbaugh's comments were sad and disappointing, they bothered him, and he wouldn't have much use for an apology. It also quoted, without naming him, a self-serving statement from George Bodenheimer, president of ESPN and ABC Sports. "We accept his resignation and regret the circumstances surrounding this," the statement said. "We believe that he took the appropriate action to resolve this matter expeditiously."

ESPN regrets the circumstances? The network created the circumstances. Bodenheimer sounded as stupid and disingenuous as MSNBC executives did in July when they declared themselves shocked and disappointed that homophobic hate-monger Michael Savage, whom they'd hired to do that thing he does, had made homophobic, hateful comments on the air.

ESPN wants to look like it's taking the high road here, but it couldn't see the high road with the Hubble telescope. The network benefitted from the ratings boost Limbaugh's mud-slinging brought and wants to separate itself from him now that things have gotten a little too muddy. That detached sniffle about regretting the circumstances and being glad that Limbaugh "took appropriate action" almost makes it sound as though the whole thing had happened to someone else. It's like Limbaugh had somehow started showing up on "Sunday NFL Countdown" without ESPN quite being aware of what was going on.

Grambling coach Doug Williams, a pioneering black quarterback in his playing days, put it best. "They knew what they were hiring," he said. "You can paint a zebra, but it's still a zebra."

Limbaugh is a clown, a dog-and-pony show with no more insight into football than he has into politics, though he proved far less entertaining in his new field than he is in his regular gig. You can blame him for his dim-witted comments and lame attempts to shoehorn his political views into football analysis, but that seems like a waste of time. Do you blame a dog for sniffing butts? Limbaugh is what he is.

Blame ESPN for selling out the interests of its constituency for two-tenths of a ratings point and then pretending that it never happened. Sports fans deserve better.

 

calbear2000

Golden Member
Oct 17, 2001
1,027
0
0
Originally posted by: shinerburke
Originally posted by: BOBDN
Originally posted by: shinerburke
For those that want to claim McNabb is a superstar let's compare some stats.

Donovan McNabb

Jay Fiedler

Now....which one of those guys has a higher QB rating? Why isn't Fiedler considered a superstar QB? They have both been starting almost the same number of games, 58 to 57, but one is considered an all star while the other is heavily criticized for his play. Double Standard? I think so...
Dude, are you reading the same stats as I am? Unless I have them backwards (and I don't, I double checked) McNabb crushes Fiedler every year in just about every stat. This year McNabb had a poor start and he still isn't far behind Fiedler.

You are obviously a Rush listener. Or should I say were a Rush listener?

Limbaugh publicly spoke a long held private belief among his demographic and others that in order for non-whites to succeed they need some handicap given them.

That's why it was racist and anyone else who believes such gargabe is a racist right along with Limpbaugh.
Look at the career stats....

Fiedler

Games Played: 58
Passing Yards: 8984
Passing Touchdowns: 55
Interceptions: 49
QB Rating: 79.7


McNabb

Games Played: 57
Passing Yards: 10341
Passing Touchdowns: 71
Interceptions: 41
QB Rating: 77.5

Not much of a difference really....yet one is considered a superstar and the other is constantly dogged in the press.
LOL... its obviously a conspiracy.
 

friedpie

Senior member
Oct 1, 2002
703
0
0
Originally posted by: Vic
Originally posted by: CaptnKirk
Well lets see here, born & raised in Cape Girardeau, Missouri.
You figure it out.
While I read your long and footnoted 2nd post on this little subject, I'm surprised that no one else could see the amusing irony in your statement. You see, you're judging an individual based on the locality where he was born, something that is entirely beyond the individual's control, just like how race is.
Now I don't like that fat fool Limbaugh, but I'm none too fond of hypocrites either. Or should I judge you based on that sh!thole Fort Worth and its glorious past?
It was so silly it wasn't worth commenting on. The NOI is based in Chicago so I guess everyone from Chicago will be influenced by that or they will want to be black nationalists. The White Aryan Resistance is in California. I guess by his logic those people in that area are going to be Aryans.

I will admit that I didn't know Rush's home town was once part of the slave trade. Yawn.

I grew up in a tobacco town. I guess I should be a smoker, but I'm not.

 

BOBDN

Banned
May 21, 2002
2,579
0
0
Originally posted by: CADkindaGUY
Originally posted by: BOBDN
Limbaugh publicly spoke a long held private belief among his demographic and others that in order for non-whites to succeed they need some handicap given them.

That's why it was racist and anyone else who believes such gargabe is a racist right along with Limpbaugh.
No - It isn't "racist" in ANY way.

I believe that people should be judged on MERIT and acheivement - not skin color. AA or any other programs which "help" "minorities" are the racist ones. To think that one race needs "help" to be as "successful" as another is blatantly racist - which AA is. Rush doesn't agree with, as you say, "handicaping". If you think that - you are very much misinformed about Rush. You should listen to him talk about this tommorow as he isn't behind the golden EIB microphone today because he is giving the keynote address to some conference today;) I'll be willing to bet over half of his show tommorow will address this fake "race" firestorm. Tom Sullivan is on today though, but I'm sure you could learn a bit from him though too.

CkG
Uh huh. A Rush Limbaugh listener. I should have known. That explains A LOT.
 

feralkid

Lifer
Jan 28, 2002
14,972
2,270
126
Originally posted by: friedpie
Originally posted by: CaptnKirk
Well lets see here, born & raised in Cape Girardeau, Missouri.
You figure it out.
I have it figured out: You are not very bright.

Where you are born has nothing to do with whether or not you are racist. Missouri is not the south, either. It's the mid-west.

While your first statement is correct and the second is true from a geographical standpoint...

Missouri was a slave state...ask anyone from "Bleeding Kansas", or just do a Google search.

I mean no offense to anyone from the great State of Missouri; I am only pointing out a historical fact.
 

CADsortaGUY

Lifer
Oct 19, 2001
25,162
1
76
www.ShawCAD.com
Originally posted by: BOBDN
Originally posted by: CADkindaGUY
Originally posted by: BOBDN
Limbaugh publicly spoke a long held private belief among his demographic and others that in order for non-whites to succeed they need some handicap given them.

That's why it was racist and anyone else who believes such gargabe is a racist right along with Limpbaugh.
No - It isn't "racist" in ANY way.

I believe that people should be judged on MERIT and acheivement - not skin color. AA or any other programs which "help" "minorities" are the racist ones. To think that one race needs "help" to be as "successful" as another is blatantly racist - which AA is. Rush doesn't agree with, as you say, "handicaping". If you think that - you are very much misinformed about Rush. You should listen to him talk about this tommorow as he isn't behind the golden EIB microphone today because he is giving the keynote address to some conference today;) I'll be willing to bet over half of his show tommorow will address this fake "race" firestorm. Tom Sullivan is on today though, but I'm sure you could learn a bit from him though too.

CkG
Uh huh. A Rush Limbaugh listener. I should have known. That explains A LOT.
Umm - I also listen to NPR, watch Public Television(jim lehrer), and "other" things. Rush is not only entertaining, he talks about alot of issues - some of which I don't agree with him on.

CkG
 

icecreamman11

Member
Apr 22, 2003
63
0
0
I disagree with Rush Limbaugh's statement about Donovan but he does have a point. I can recall many segments on multiple NFL shows that discussed black quaterbacks. They talked about Randall Cunningham and Warren Moon and how many more black quarterbacks are getting chances in the NFL. If Chris Berman and others say they never refer to athletes as "black" athletes or "white" athletes, then why do they spend the time to look into rise of black QBs as well as black head coaches. Lions were fined for not pursuing a black canidtae after they hired Steve Mariucci and the Marlins were fined for doing the same with Jack Mckeon. Also, couple nights ago, the media made a big deal about the billboard chart. They claimed that it was the first time that the entire Top 10 songs were recorded by black artists. So what? If race doesn't matter, they why is that significant?
 

CADsortaGUY

Lifer
Oct 19, 2001
25,162
1
76
www.ShawCAD.com
Originally posted by: icecreamman11
I disagree with Rush Limbaugh's statement about Donovan but he does have a point. I can recall many segments on multiple NFL shows that discussed black quaterbacks. They talked about Randall Cunningham and Warren Moon and how many more black quarterbacks are getting chances in the NFL. If Chris Berman and others say they never refer to athletes as "black" athletes or "white" athletes, then why do they spend the time to look into rise of black QBs as well as black head coaches. Lions were fined for not pursuing a black canidtae after they hired Steve Mariucci and the Marlins were fined for doing the same with Jack Mckeon. Also, couple nights ago, the media made a big deal about the billboard chart. They claimed that it was the first time that the entire Top 10 songs were recorded by black artists. So what? If race doesn't matter, they why is that significant?
Shhh...

That kind of common sense talk isn't allowed around here;)

CkG
 

CADsortaGUY

Lifer
Oct 19, 2001
25,162
1
76
www.ShawCAD.com
Originally posted by: icecreamman11
I disagree with Rush Limbaugh's statement about Donovan but he does have a point. I can recall many segments on multiple NFL shows that discussed black quaterbacks. They talked about Randall Cunningham and Warren Moon and how many more black quarterbacks are getting chances in the NFL. If Chris Berman and others say they never refer to athletes as "black" athletes or "white" athletes, then why do they spend the time to look into rise of black QBs as well as black head coaches. Lions were fined for not pursuing a black canidtae after they hired Steve Mariucci and the Marlins were fined for doing the same with Jack Mckeon. Also, couple nights ago, the media made a big deal about the billboard chart. They claimed that it was the first time that the entire Top 10 songs were recorded by black artists. So what? If race doesn't matter, they why is that significant?
Shhh...

That kind of common sense talk isn't allowed around here;)

CkG
 

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