Is my PSU/GPU dead or alive

saviour2016

Junior Member
Nov 4, 2016
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My System is Following
1. CPU - i7 4790K
2. Mobo - ASUS Z97 PRO
3. GPU - AMD R7 260X Sapphire
4. PSU - Cooler Master G550M

My PC stopped suddenly, i tried the reset button several time but it did not work. So i opened it and tried the paper clip method of the PSU. The Fan Runs. So i thought maybe the GPU is in trouble. So i removed the GPU and it works.

However when i keep the GPU with the power cable removed as far as i understand the bios should start. However the cpu fan starts for a split second and stops.

I am using this setup for around 20 Months, and it was working fine. The parts above are in my opinion good quality. So is it possible that my GPU might have died. I mean it did not show any artifact. I feel that my PSU might not be giving enough power in the PCI express so that the GPU is not running.

My question is how can i check which of the part is the troublemaker, is it the PSU, the GPU or the PCI express slot in the motherboard. And can GPU die suddenly like that?

I can not return it as the warranty period is over. I dont have another PSU or PC to check the parts.


Please reply your suggestions
 

EXCellR8

Diamond Member
Sep 1, 2010
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remove graphics adapter and temporarily use the video from the processor; if your motherboard has video ports (which it should).

disconnect all hard drive and all but one stick of memory, then test.

it is possible that the GPU is overheating, so inspect the cooler and apply some new thermal if necessary.

rewire everything as a last ditch effort, and then test the PSU (testers are rather cheap)
 
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UsandThem

Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 4, 2000
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It could be the PSU has leaking caps, or is unable to supply all the power needed with a discreet video card. The PSU is in the decent category, and it doesn't use these best caps:

http://www.hardocp.com/article/2015/06/09/cooler_master_g550m_550w_power_supply_review/9#.WBy94fkrJhE

Do what EXLellR8 recommended, and if you still have issues, the only way to know for sure is to test your video card in another PC, and to try a different PSU. If there isn't a friend or family member who has a machine where you can do this, you might just have to bite the bullet and take it in to a local PC repair shop.
 
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saviour2016

Junior Member
Nov 4, 2016
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My luck has become worse. Now the PC wont start. I now similar problem to this video no post no boot (You can see from this video ( start at 4 min 23 second) that for one time the boot stops abruptly and then retries in my case it just never starts. No matter how many times i press the power button it starts for 2-3 seconds and then stops abruptly) no beep no error nothing


I have done the following
1. Checked the GPU with another cpu+mobo+psu that PC does not start nor does it beeps or shows any error
2. Checked if my PSU can run another PC it runs the other PC perfectly
3. Checked if other PSU can run my PC, with GPU nothing happens, without GPU the systems starts then stops abruptly no beep no error q-code

Feeling Very Bad. This PC was very expensive
 

UsandThem

Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 4, 2000
15,319
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My luck has become worse. Now the PC wont start. I now similar problem to this video no post no boot (You can see from this video ( start at 4 min 23 second) that for one time the boot stops abruptly and then retries in my case it just never starts. No matter how many times i press the power button it starts for 2-3 seconds and then stops abruptly) no beep no error nothing

I have done the following
1. Checked the GPU with another cpu+mobo+psu that PC does not start nor does it beeps or shows any error
2. Checked if my PSU can run another PC it runs the other PC perfectly
3. Checked if other PSU can run my PC, with GPU nothing happens, without GPU the systems starts then stops abruptly no beep no error q-code

Feeling Very Bad. This PC was very expensive
Tough one there. Maybe the video card died, and maybe it damaged the motherboard (or vice versa).

When you tried your PSU in another computer, did that system have a video card, and did you place a load on it (e.g fired up a game, or run something like the Intel Extreme Tuning utility)? I just want to rule out it not hosing your components (although I can't in good conscious ask you to potentially damage someone's system).

So it is likely your motherboard and video card are toast, now you have to figure out what caused it without damaging anything else.

Do you have your PC on a UPS or surge protector, and where there recently any storms in your area (possible surge damage)?
 

VirtualLarry

No Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
52,635
7,321
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I have done the following
1. Checked the GPU with another cpu+mobo+psu that PC does not start nor does it beeps or shows any error
2. Checked if my PSU can run another PC it runs the other PC perfectly
3. Checked if other PSU can run my PC, with GPU nothing happens, without GPU the systems starts then stops abruptly no beep no error q-code

Feeling Very Bad. This PC was very expensive
When all else fails, a "Hail Mary" pass can help. Try unplugging it from the wall, unplug the GPU, make sure that BOTH the ATX 24-pin, as well as the 4/8-pin ATX12V is connected properly, and then try clearing the CMOS, using the mobo jumper.

Set the jumper back to the "normal" position, plug the PC back into the wall, Pray, and hit the power button.

Edit: The "clear CMOS" trick saved me once. I thought I had sweated into my friend's mobo when attempting to install a PCI-E 6600GT video card, and ruined it.

Turned out, for whatever reason, that video card would cause the mobo not to boot. (Via chipset, and apparently finicky.) Clearing CMOS (without the video card present) allowed it to boot again, using the chipset IGP.

Just removing the card wasn't good enough.
 
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saviour2016

Junior Member
Nov 4, 2016
3
0
6
Tough one there. Maybe the video card died, and maybe it damaged the motherboard (or vice versa).

When you tried your PSU in another computer, did that system have a video card, and did you place a load on it (e.g fired up a game, or run something like the Intel Extreme Tuning utility)? I just want to rule out it not hosing your components (although I can't in good conscious ask you to potentially damage someone's system).

So it is likely your motherboard and video card are toast, now you have to figure out what caused it without damaging anything else.

Do you have your PC on a UPS or surge protector, and where there recently any storms in your area (possible surge damage)?
No i dont use any UPS. There was not storms in the area. No i did not put a load on the Other PC as i seemed a little dangerous.
 

Valantar

Golden Member
Aug 26, 2014
1,792
508
136
Sounds like it's time for some standard PC troubleshooting. Based on what you've already done, it's time to go back to basics.

1) Remove anything but essentials from your PC. This means all that should be connected is the motherboard, CPU, PSU and one (1) stick of RAM. Nothing else. Neither data nor power to anything else. See if you get into the BIOS. If not, exchange the RAM for another stick, try again. Try with another (known good) PSU. If you can, test your RAM in another PC to see if it works. If it does, and you PC still won't boot, either your motherboard or CPU is dead. My money would be on the motherboard, as it has far more possible points of failure than a CPU. Also, replace your CMOS battery if possible. I've never had to do this (and my motherboard is more than 8 years old ...), but YMMV.

2) If it does boot on any of these tries, power off and try again. See if it sticks, or if it was a fluke. If it keeps booting, add hardware one piece at a time until it fails. When/if it fails, try with the other PSU. If it still fails, odds are that the last component you added is dead. To verify, try booting again, and then remove it and try booting once more. If it only boots with that component removed, it's obviously dead. If the connected component is an HDD or SSD, try it in several SATA ports (and if your mobo has them, any/all SATA controllers), and if it's a PCIe device, try it in more than one slot. If the component is dead, put it to the side and keep going until everything has been tested.

3) If failures and successful boots are intermittent, odds are your motherboard or PSU are at fault. If you're testing with a known good PSU, chances are very high that your motherboard is at fault. If it works with a few components, and fails when more are added (especially power hungry components like GPUs and 3,5" HDDs), chances are your PSU is fried.

RMA anything defective that's within warranty. Replace defective parts that aren't. Do not mess with DIY component repairs unless you're absolutely sure what you're doing - chances are you'll do more harm than good. If the fault is in the motherboard or CPU, they were purchased from the same place, and you can RMA them through the store, ask if you can send both in for testing. Unless they're total a**holes, that should be doable (and free), and you'd get whatever component was faulty replaced and the working one back.
 

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