Is Dr. Oz legit? What's his speciality in, and how does that relate to nutrition?

Discussion in 'Health and Fitness' started by MrEgo, Jun 30, 2011.

  1. MrEgo

    MrEgo Senior member

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    Not a rhetorical question. Just wondering if anyone has any educated opinions on him.
     
  2. DisgruntledVirus

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    Well, the nutritionist that I work with who has been doing it for years and works with marathoners, ultra marathoners, and people during rehab says that he is full of shit basically. I'm not a professional (and I just have my self-education in nutrition), but I completely agree with her FWIW.
     
  3. Whisper

    Whisper Diamond Member

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    If I'm remembering correctly, I think he's a cardiologist...? Which means if he's learned anything about nutrition, it's general information from medical school coupled with whatever he's decided to read in his spare time afterward (unless he's done some sort of continuing ed in it), I believe.
     
  4. wheresmybacon

    wheresmybacon Diamond Member

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    He's a heart surgeon. I've seen his show a few times, and IMO he doesn't seem to try and come off as anything other than he is.

    One show I saw that I like he had Tim Ferriss as a guest. Interesting stuff.

    Specifically, I came to know of Ferriss by way of his blog and these posts in particular:

    Lose 20 Pounds of Fat in 30 Days Without Exercise:
    http://www.fourhourworkweek.com/blo...of-fat-in-30-days-without-doing-any-exercise/

    Gain 34 Pounds of Muscle in 4 Weeks
    http://www.fourhourworkweek.com/blo...eak-how-i-gained-34-lbs-of-muscle-in-4-weeks/
     
    #4 wheresmybacon, Jul 1, 2011
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2011
  5. highland145

    highland145 Lifer

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    Thoughts on this.
     
  6. spamsk8r

    spamsk8r Golden Member

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    It's legit, but a lot of it was due to regaining lost muscle mass, not putting on a bunch of new muscle without ever having trained before. It's fairly well documented in the book.

    EDIT: The book I'm referring to is The 4-Hour Body.
     
  7. wheresmybacon

    wheresmybacon Diamond Member

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    IMO it's possible, but not probable, that Tim gained that much muscle in a month. The qualifier is if he was once much larger like Casey Viator, the pro bodybuilder Arthur Jones used as the subject of the The Colorado Experiment, then I believe it. Obviously not as big as Casey - who was huge - but at least an experienced lifter with much more muscle on his frame than he had at the start of the endeavor.

    I personally favor low volume routines, as I've seen great results with strength retention and even increases in a few lifts as I've been on a slow cut since March. Further, since I'm running again, my recovery doesn't seem to suffer as much as it did as when I was going really high volume stuff.
     
  8. highland145

    highland145 Lifer

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    Thanks. I've been bigger. The last six months I may have lifted once per week (or less) with 5-6 days of cardio. Might give it a try.
     
  9. purbeast0

    purbeast0 Lifer

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    i dont believe that shit for a second.

    in that link you post, not only did he gain it in 4 weeks, he gained it by doing 2 30 minute workouts a week.

    that is 4 hours total in a month.

    i don't buy it for a second.
     
  10. irishScott

    irishScott Lifer

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    He comes off as honest, and even if some of it is overblown a lot of what he talks about seems to check out. At least from a basic health standpoint.

    What he's done is compiled a detailed general guide to nutrition/health delivered in a comprehensive and friendly, almost non-academic manner. Makes it more accessible and enjoyable to the average person.
     
  11. Malfeas

    Malfeas Senior member

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    It also helped that Casey Viator was taking heavy doses of vitamin (D)ianabol, and that he went to another gym and worked with free weights after his sessions with Arthur Jones.
     
  12. McWatt

    McWatt Senior member

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    Doctor Oz may sometimes refer to reality, but never believe anything he says without researching it further. He's one of the biggest anti-science, pro-magic personalities in the world.

    He promotes psychic healing, healing of any disease through drinking vials of pure water (homeopathy), and all sorts of other pretend treatments.

    He's frequently recognized publicly for his war against science. For instance:

    "The Media Pigasus Award goes to Dr. Mehmet Oz, who has done such a disservice to his TV viewers by promoting quack medical practices that he is now the first person to win a Pigasus two years in a row. Dr. Oz is a Harvard-educated cardiac physician who, through his syndicated TV show, has promoted faith healing, "energy medicine," and other quack theories that have no scientific basis. Oz has appeared on ABC News to give legitimacy to the claims of Brazilian faith healer “John of God,” who uses old carnival tricks to take money from the seriously ill. He's hosted Ayurvedic guru Yogi Cameron on his show to promote nonsense "tongue examination" as a way of diagnosing health problems. This year, he really went off the deep end. In March 2011, Dr. Oz endorsed "psychic" huckster and past Pigasus winner John Edward, who pretends to talk to dead people. Oz even suggested that bereaved families should visit psychic mediums to receive (faked) messages from their dead relatives as a form of grief counseling." http://www.randi.org/site/index.php/jref-news/1260-pigasus-2011.html
     
  13. irishScott

    irishScott Lifer

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    Meh, I've read the YOU books and none of that stuff is in there.

    Also I'm not sure how legit that Pigasus is. http://homeopathyresource.wordpress...ends-homeopathy-in-oprah-winfreys-o-magazine/

    So he's saying they could be useful once you've ruled out traditional medical problems. And for things like headaches, they very much may be, even if homeopathy is essentially the placebo effect.
     
    #13 irishScott, Jul 5, 2011
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2011
  14. irishScott

    irishScott Lifer

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    On second thought, maybe he has become a bit of a quack.
    http://www.tvguide.com/News/Dr-Oz-Says-1030667.aspx

    He can't explain how the guy could obtain a list of people who bought tickets and their seat numbers, do some googling and mask it by asking the person next to them? Seriously?
     
  15. iluvdeal

    iluvdeal Golden Member

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    Stuff like this is bound to happen. For TV shows like his, you can only do so many episodes where you dispense the same advice of eating right and exercise. The audience will grow tired of hearing the same message all the time. The TV season is very long and there's a lot of episodes to fill, so guys like John Edwards become attractive to book. Oprah had her freak show episodes, I expect the same on the Dr. Oz show.
     
  16. skace

    skace Lifer

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    The Dog Whisperer constantly disperses the exact same advice and the show never really grows old. In fact, the fascinating aspect is that the same advice is constantly true. It's like continuously testing a hypothesis.

    If I had a show on getting healthy, you damn well believe I'd be trying to apply the same rule to every person as often as possible. Proving it is true time and time again is really what drives the nail home and shows people that ultimately their own mindset is what holds them back on a continuous life long basis.

    And honestly, that geek to freak website is such a fucking joke. The guy is in GREAT shape in the original photos, yet calls himself a "geek" to make it ok. I honestly don't know if he gained new muscle, old muscle, or how he did it, but he isn't his target audience and he is providing 0 guarantee that his target audience will get to where they want to be following his guide.