Question Is a yearly subscription for software common now?

ricleo2

Golden Member
Feb 18, 2004
1,110
6
81
I built a new computer, so I thought I would get the latest Quicken as I have Quicken Basic 2007. That software is purchased through a yearly subscription only. Is this common?
 

Steltek

Platinum Member
Mar 29, 2001
2,238
216
106
The software producers would all like it to be as it is a guaranteed income stream to them.

Adobe mostly has moved to this, and Microsoft has gone there with Office. They only still have a standalone version of Office due to customer outrage, but that will only stay their hand so long. I keep expecting them to pull a 180 and try to do the same for Windows as the development cycle of Windows 10 is totally primed for it.

Of course, the day they do is the day I move exclusively to Linux. I'd never tolerate a company dictating to me what and how to run the software on my computer as well as charging me for their pleasure in doing so. If I wanted that, I'd just use an Apple.
 
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VirtualLarry

Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
48,384
5,094
126
I just came up with an "Awful Idea" - "Software Franchise Agreements", rather than "EULAs". You have to agree to become a "Software Franchisee", when you want to use their software, as they provide it as part of the "Franchise Support", but it would, in theory, come with "exclusivity agreements", in which, the software provider for your franchise agreement, would either legally, or otherwise actually UNINSTALL COMPETING SOFTWARE OF THAT TYPE off of your PC. And you would be locked into the "Franchise Agreement", for a length of time.

Wait for it, people, it's coming. You thought the lack of choice between Coke and Pepsi at your local fast-food joint was bad, wait until the same thing happens to the software environment on your PCs.
 

ricleo2

Golden Member
Feb 18, 2004
1,110
6
81
I just came up with an "Awful Idea" - "Software Franchise Agreements", rather than "EULAs". You have to agree to become a "Software Franchisee", when you want to use their software, as they provide it as part of the "Franchise Support", but it would, in theory, come with "exclusivity agreements", in which, the software provider for your franchise agreement, would either legally, or otherwise actually UNINSTALL COMPETING SOFTWARE OF THAT TYPE off of your PC. And you would be locked into the "Franchise Agreement", for a length of time.

Wait for it, people, it's coming. You thought the lack of choice between Coke and Pepsi at your local fast-food joint was bad, wait until the same thing happens to the software environment on your PCs.
I am all for capitalism, but this is almost shameful. Hopefully the market will say so too. I did not buy the subscription.
 

Steltek

Platinum Member
Mar 29, 2001
2,238
216
106
I just came up with an "Awful Idea" - "Software Franchise Agreements", rather than "EULAs". You have to agree to become a "Software Franchisee", when you want to use their software, as they provide it as part of the "Franchise Support", but it would, in theory, come with "exclusivity agreements", in which, the software provider for your franchise agreement, would either legally, or otherwise actually UNINSTALL COMPETING SOFTWARE OF THAT TYPE off of your PC. And you would be locked into the "Franchise Agreement", for a length of time.

Wait for it, people, it's coming. You thought the lack of choice between Coke and Pepsi at your local fast-food joint was bad, wait until the same thing happens to the software environment on your PCs.
You know, it is funny you should bring that up.

Bitdefender has the newest version of its free antivirus set up so that it will force you to uninstall Malwarebytes Premium if it exists on the target machine -- it is even nice enough to run the Malwarebytes uninstaller program for you.

They claim, of course, that it is due to compatibility issues though I've never once had problems running them together before. And, curiously, they seem to coexist just fine if you install Malwarebytes after installing Bitdefender.
 

Red Squirrel

No Lifer
May 24, 2003
56,230
7,586
126
www.uovalor.com
Unfortunately yes. I'm mostly into open source now, but I was looking at paid video edition programs for fun since the only decent Linux option Kdenlive still lacks tons of features so I was going to bite the bullet and just buy a Windows one and use it on my gaming machine, but it's all subscription now. Sucks. There is no freaking way I'm paying per month for software. I hate that people even do it and just accept it, as it means the companies will continue to do it.
 

VirtualLarry

Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
48,384
5,094
126
You know, it is funny you should bring that up.

Bitdefender has the newest version of its free antivirus set up so that it will force you to uninstall Malwarebytes Premium if it exists on the target machine -- it is even nice enough to run the Malwarebytes uninstaller program for you.

They claim, of course, that it is due to compatibility issues though I've never once had problems running them together before. And, curiously, they seem to coexist just fine if you install Malwarebytes after installing Bitdefender.
Such is the "progress" of the land of "Commercial For-Profit Corporate-developed Software". Expect to see more of that. I'm kind of curious how the EULA is written and structured, to provide legal cover for them un-installing a competitor's product, in order to install theirs.
 

Steltek

Platinum Member
Mar 29, 2001
2,238
216
106
Such is the "progress" of the land of "Commercial For-Profit Corporate-developed Software". Expect to see more of that. I'm kind of curious how the EULA is written and structured, to provide legal cover for them un-installing a competitor's product, in order to install theirs.
The software itself tells the end user that Malwarebytes is "incompatible software". The actual decision to remove it is left with the end user, but you can't preceed with the Bitdefender install unless you remove it. It is true even if you disable the Malwarebytes application, so Bitdefender's installer is actually going out of its way to look for it.

I just said the heck with it and installed Avast.
 

Red Squirrel

No Lifer
May 24, 2003
56,230
7,586
126
www.uovalor.com
It boggles my mind Windows people put up with this kind of BS. Did not realize the windows scene got THAT bad where software is now essentially forcing you to remove competitor products. Sadly not surprised though. "But if you don't agree just don't use the product" is what some people would say... that's still a BS thing to agree with especially when you already bought it. If I pay for a piece of software I should not have to agree to BS like that, just give me the functionality I paid for with no strings attached.
 

Steltek

Platinum Member
Mar 29, 2001
2,238
216
106
Thats the kicker. You have to buy the software to read the EULA. You can stop using the software, but they won't in most cases refund your money.

The day the courts allowed software to be considered a legal construct rather than a physical product pretty much removed end user rights.

I can't wait for the day when I have to agree to a EULA to use my new refrigerator or coffee maker (oh, wait, I forgot - Keurig already did that).
 

VirtualLarry

Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
48,384
5,094
126
I can't wait for the day when I have to agree to a EULA to use my new refrigerator or coffee maker (oh, wait, I forgot - Keurig already did that).
Atari (old Atari) did that too, with their 64-bit Jaguar console system. When you bought it, the plastic shrink-wrap over the console, had a EULA printed on it (inside the box), and it claimed that if you opened the bag (which you basically necessarily had to do, to get your console out and hook it up, that you were agreeing to the barely-readable EULA.

Possibly a good choice for a temporary dog toy, if you get what I mean. At least, until the bag is off..

Edit: Oh yeah, "old Atari" promptly went out of business, after that. :p
 

Jstanthr

Junior Member
Feb 22, 2010
9
2
81
i dont like yearly subscriptions for software myself. which is why i still use office 2010, which works perfect for my needs
im still running 2010 on my old desktop, but i went ahead and bought 2019 home and student, its basically a standalone without the subscription, it was a pita to find on the site, you have to go through the "show all options" link that was nearly hidden by an ad
 

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