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News Intel to develop discrete GPUs

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Tup3x

Senior member
Dec 31, 2016
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Are those two tiles tiles or bunch of chiplets? In any case, this is definitely the future.
 

gdansk

Senior member
Feb 8, 2011
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Based on the specifications of Aurora it is about 21tflops (fp64). About double the fp64 throughput of MI100/A100 for HPC purposes. A100 can compete if work is Tensor-able. Configuration probably 64 EU per compute cluster, since Xe HPC showed an fp64 unit. 8 compute clusters per tile. 2 tiles per GPU. 6 GPU per node. So it needs to clock around 1300 MHz just like Intel demonstrated with Xe HP.

Target TDP? Aurora with 9000 nodes should be <= 60mw which leaves nearly 7kw per node which will have six of these. Clearly these will be only some fraction of that per node amount. So maybe 500W was right.
 
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jpiniero

Diamond Member
Oct 1, 2010
9,047
1,743
126

Intel is restricting the desktop DG1 to only OEMs and only Coffee Lake Refresh or Comet Lake.
 

NTMBK

Diamond Member
Nov 14, 2011
9,197
2,502
136

Intel is restricting the desktop DG1 to only OEMs and only Coffee Lake Refresh or Comet Lake.
What the actual hell? Cheap video out for GPU-less Ryzen CPUs seems like the most obvious way to sell this turkey. Intel are shooting themselves in the foot here.
 

PingSpike

Lifer
Feb 25, 2004
21,451
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Hell, it doesn't even support most Intel processors. This isn't really a discrete card then, more like a cpu add on module.

This is actually pretty classic Intel though. They take something most people barely care about, and then lock it behind high end chipsets or only certain cpu types to try and force people to buy all their stuff to get it. Which would work if it was amazing but when its just an also ran itmakes it a bad value and ends up ignored.
 

guidryp

Golden Member
Apr 3, 2006
1,153
1,222
136

Intel is restricting the desktop DG1 to only OEMs and only Coffee Lake Refresh or Comet Lake.
It's more like an extended beta test, giving intel some exposure to building a discrete GPU with training wheels on.
 

LightningZ71

Senior member
Mar 10, 2017
715
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I'm surprised that it doesn't also require having an installed "Optane" memory module in the first M.2 slot as well...
 

KompuKare

Senior member
Jul 28, 2009
653
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Hell, it doesn't even support most Intel processors. This isn't really a discrete card then, more like a cpu add on module.

This is actually pretty classic Intel though. They take something most people barely care about, and then lock it behind high end chipsets or only certain cpu types to try and force people to buy all their stuff to get it. Which would work if it was amazing but when its just an also ran itmakes it a bad value and ends up ignored.
In other words: Intel are still segmenting like crazy because that behaviour gave them so much extra revenue previously. Crazy!

Looking at the Iris Xe in Ian's Cezanne review (yes AT got a hardware exclusive!), this actually performs worse than I had expected based on Notebookcheck reviews.

Wonder how competitive (or not) Intel are in terms of perf/transistors or perf/watt?
 

PingSpike

Lifer
Feb 25, 2004
21,451
360
126
LOL, this thing kind of reminds me of the i740 now. If Nvidia can pump out cheap GT1010s I don't see the point for even an OEM to buy it unless its basically free. Seems like an inventory headache.
 

VirtualLarry

No Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
50,784
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LOL, this thing kind of reminds me of the i740 now. If Nvidia can pump out cheap GT1010s I don't see the point for even an OEM to buy it unless its basically free. Seems like an inventory headache.
Maybe this GPU release from Intel, is what prompted NVidia to "announce" the GT 1010 card(s), to drive out potential OEM rig competition from Intel. After, does a buyer want a PC with "Nvidia" or "Intel" inside.
 

Insert_Nickname

Diamond Member
May 6, 2012
3,983
585
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Maybe this GPU release from Intel, is what prompted NVidia to "announce" the GT 1010 card(s), to drive out potential OEM rig competition from Intel. After, does a buyer want a PC with "Nvidia" or "Intel" inside.
It certainly doesn't seem outside the realm of possibility.
 

DrMrLordX

Lifer
Apr 27, 2000
17,031
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Wait, didn't Intel already produce a developer-only 96 EU DG1 some time ago? Why are they selling this 80EU turd?
 

John Carmack

Member
Sep 10, 2016
115
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In other words: Intel are still segmenting like crazy because that behaviour gave them so much extra revenue previously. Crazy!

Looking at the Iris Xe in Ian's Cezanne review (yes AT got a hardware exclusive!), this actually performs worse than I had expected based on Notebookcheck reviews.

Wonder how competitive (or not) Intel are in terms of perf/transistors or perf/watt?
Even Intel is not that insane. It does make me wonder if the talk from CES 2020 about DG1 being a testing platform for developers was them laying down preemptive cover for Xe's "Cannon Lake" moment because developers sure as hell aren't buying low end prebuilts for GPU testing.
 

Leeea

Senior member
Apr 3, 2020
554
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This product had some nice potential. There is a market for high res high refresh video outs with good hardware video codec support. A limited market, but a market none the less. Mostly in older PCs looking for cheap upgrades to run nice monitors.


Then they locked it up behind 15 different hoops, jumps, and loligags and wonder why it fails. It is just sad.

My original cynical verdict stands:
stock market launch
 
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blckgrffn

Diamond Member
May 1, 2003
7,653
876
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www.teamjuchems.com
This product had some nice potential. There is a market for high res high refresh video outs with good hardware video codec support. A limited market, but a market none the less. Mostly in older PCs looking for cheap upgrades to run nice monitors.


Then they locked it up behind 15 different hoops, jumps, and loligags and wonder why it fails. It is just sad.

My original cynical verdict stands:
stock market launch
There is a market for ANY gpu avaiable right now that can Fortnight/Apex etc. and be actually purchasable around $100. I mean, I think they would sell a lot of them, potentially. There might not be a better time than now! Retail stores are just literally sold out our double the price of any alternatives.

If this is the 25W card, where is the "double the everythings" card with DDR5 and and 60 to 75W draw? Price it at $119 4GB/$149 8GB and watch them just disappear from shelves if they can perform at all.

But yeah, only working with OEM systems, essentially, because reasons (wanting to make sure there isn't massive negative feedback due to driver/combability issues that poisons the well for years to come, see AMD, perhaps) makes you wonder how ready this thing is. Xe has been at least around for a few months in real systems. Is this another "shared memory over PCI" debacle? It will be exciting to find out.
 

Tup3x

Senior member
Dec 31, 2016
503
373
136
DG1 is just their integrated GPU in external for. Obviously it's not Intel's plan to sell them like crazy for desktops. It's a test bed, nothing more. It's not meant for DIY customers.
 

PingSpike

Lifer
Feb 25, 2004
21,451
360
126
DG1 is just their integrated GPU in external for. Obviously it's not Intel's plan to sell them like crazy for desktops. It's a test bed, nothing more. It's not meant for DIY customers.
That makes it sound like a prototype which is the last thing an OEM wants installed.

My opinion is that despite Intel's denials, this is just a way to eat up dies with a dead cpu but a working iGPU. And they put the bare minimum into its development to get them working on platforms that already knew how to hook into iGPU so they can sell it with F series. When Intel basically was the entire market they didn't need to do this, they just threw away imperfect dies so the OEMs had an iGPU whether they wanted it or not. But now the OEMs have been buying F series and plopping cheapo discrete cards in there which Intel probably hates.
 

jpiniero

Diamond Member
Oct 1, 2010
9,047
1,743
126
That makes it sound like a prototype which is the last thing an OEM wants installed.

My opinion is that despite Intel's denials, this is just a way to eat up dies with a dead cpu but a working iGPU. And they put the bare minimum into its development to get them working on platforms that already knew how to hook into iGPU so they can sell it with F series. When Intel basically was the entire market they didn't need to do this, they just threw away imperfect dies so the OEMs had an iGPU whether they wanted it or not. But now the OEMs have been buying F series and plopping cheapo discrete cards in there which Intel probably hates.
Intel insists that DG1 is a native die and not defective U parts. It is still likely the U design cut down to remove everything other than the memory controller and the IGP.

BTW when it comes to F processors, Dell is putting in at the very least the 1650 Super so I guess that's not that bad.
 
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