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Intel Cannonlake, Ice Lake, Tiger Lake & Sapphire rapid thread

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IntelUser2000

Elite Member
Oct 14, 2003
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It's either Ice Lake server or some form of Willow Cove due to the cache configuration. Sky Lake server based designs are 1MB L2$ and 1.375MB L3 $ per core. This is 1.25MB and 1.5MB per core.
This is no doubt Icelake-SP.

The platform is on the SuperMicro X12DAi-N SMC X12 board.

If you investigate a little more you'll see other CPUs with the same cache configuration but with 14 cores on the SuperMicro X12DPT-B and SuperMicro X12DPi-N(T) SMC X11 platform.

You can also see Cascade Lake-SP CPU using the SuperMicro X11DAi-N SMC X11 platform. If you search for the motherboard, it does indeed support Cascade Lake. So the X12 is the next generation platform.
 

Gideon

Senior member
Nov 27, 2007
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Hold on, so does this leak (2 x 6cores) mean that Ice-lake servers are also 2 "glued together" CPUs?
 

jpiniero

Diamond Member
Oct 1, 2010
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Hold on, so does this leak (2 x 6cores) mean that Ice-lake servers are also 2 "glued together" CPUs?
Cooper is rumored to be using EMIB to connect the two dies (and an 10 nm IO die). Possible that Intel went ahead and converted Icelake Server to be the same but I still think they didn't bother. It is a dual socket board so it could just be two 6 core dies which does look silly but Intel is selling similar speced Skylake-SP now.
 
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uzzi38

Senior member
Oct 16, 2019
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Gideon

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Nov 27, 2007
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Another Tiger Lake U spotted. It does have 1.25 MB L2 and 12 MB L3. Reported max frequency is 3.9.
Actually two of them:

The first was sustaining clock-speeds of around 3700MHz, the other one was 3500MHz. Though geekbench is pretty light on the CPU, my 3700x also runs at ~4375 MHz stock

EDIT: had an invalid link for the first CPU
 
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csbin

Senior member
Feb 4, 2013
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Intel Corporation Tiger Lake Client Platform





"frequencies": [ 3572, 3697, 3665, 3670, 3683, 3679, 3626, 3753, 3744, 3639, 3785, 3737, 3615, 3726, 3767, 3669, 3592, 3616, 3587, 3679, 3718, 3587, 3616, 3771, 3760, 3777, 3676, 3740, 3772, 3674, 3769, 3734, 3702, 3733, 3687, 3731, 3769 ]




Single-Core Score: 1189

Multi-Core Score: 4274
 

uzzi38

Senior member
Oct 16, 2019
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Like I said before, you're best off disregarding it. Don't look into this one too carefully, any conclusions based off of this one will be wrong.
 
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csbin

Senior member
Feb 4, 2013
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Dell Inc. XPS 13 7390 2-in-1

1065G7


"frequencies": [ 3846, 3879, 3854, 3811, 3870, 3838, 3859, 3872, 3654, 3859, 3869, 3726, 3832, 3861, 3850, 3866, 3871, 3836, 3840, 3871, 3868, 3860, 3860, 3856, 3863, 3870, 3864, 3833, 3762, 3767, 3861, 3871, 3861, 3854, 3870, 3851, 3854, 3879, 3858 ]



Single-Core Score: 1333

Multi-Core Score: 4783
 

mikk

Platinum Member
May 15, 2012
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Actually two of them:

The first was sustaining clock-speeds of around 3700MHz, the other one was 3500MHz. Though geekbench is pretty light on the CPU, my 3700x also runs at ~4375 MHz stock

EDIT: had an invalid link for the first CPU

Stepping 0, very early samples. Looks like these are the same samples from the userbenchmark page 4 months ago, same base at 1.2 Ghz and similar average at 3.6 Ghz.
 

uzzi38

Senior member
Oct 16, 2019
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Not a hard guess there, ICL-SP also has larger caches, as does SKL-SP, both when compared to their desktop counterparts. SPR will follow the same.

However, Tiger Lake itself is primarily a cache bump, so I wonder how much SPR will actually benefit even further.
 
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yeshua

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Aug 7, 2019
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itvision.altervista.org
Is there any chance Intel will release desktop 8-core Ice Lake CPUs boosting to around 4.4GHz or so with a TDP around 90W in 2020?

I'm just trying to understand whether I jumped the gun when I upgraded to Ryzen 7 3700X a few months ago.

Currently I'm not really concerned considering that the i7 1068G7 hasn't yet been released, so the current 10nm node still doesn't really work for Intel the way they want it to work 'cause otherwise Ice Lake U parts wouldn't be such a rarity.
 

lobz

Golden Member
Feb 10, 2017
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Is there any chance Intel will release desktop 8-core Ice Lake CPUs boosting to around 4.4GHz or so with a TDP around 90W in 2020?

I'm just trying to understand whether I jumped the gun when I upgraded to Ryzen 7 3700X a few months ago.

Currently I'm not really concerned considering that the i7 1068G7 hasn't yet been released, so the current 10nm node still doesn't really work for Intel the way they want it to work 'cause otherwise Ice Lake U parts wouldn't be such a rarity.
You definitely didn't jump any guns, you bought a very strong and relatively cheap CPU that will serve you perfectly fine for many years.
 

FriedMoose

Member
Dec 14, 2019
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IntelUser2000

Elite Member
Oct 14, 2003
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50.1ns DRAM latency seems pretty low for a mesh design.

edit: Holy shit the 14C ICL-SP had a memory latency of only 29.7ns. That's overclocked ring bus territory:
There are some Skylake-X and SP results with 50ns latency. I didn't look further as the search is very unintuitive. Take the numbers with a grain of salt. At least only compare it with the results from the site.
 
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uzzi38

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Also all-core/single core boost for anyone who doesn't actually open the Tweet
 

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