Question IF AMD & Intel processors were still compatible...

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MadRat

Lifer
Oct 14, 1999
11,778
120
106
AMD and Intel used their own propriety slots and sockets after their settlement. Socket 370 (Intel) and Socket A (AMD) were physically similar, but electrically incompatible. Likewise Slot 1 (Intel) and Slot A (AMD) were physically similar, but electrically incompatible. But by sharing superficially identical sockets and slots it made it cheaper for industrial partners to support both.

We had Socket 370 to Slot 1 Slockets, and we had Socket A to Slot A Slockets. But you never had AMD to Intel or vice versa Slotkets.
 

zir_blazer

Golden Member
Jun 6, 2013
1,086
325
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Is Core i5-1035G1 possible in Type 6 with 4 SODIMM slots and 128GB RAM? How much would it cost? What about drivers? It would work in Windows?
I can't answer that directly, but if you bothered to check the EPYC Embedded COM Express Type 7 module I posted before, it has 4 SODIMM Slots and Windows 10 compatibility. Drivers I suppose would be available. Look around for what you like and check its specifications.
Ryzen Embedded supports 1 DPC only so you can do 2 SODIMM with it, not 4. I don't know why AMD limited them that way since they are using the same die than desktop parts that do support 2 DPC.

The problem is costs. The carrier boards are around 500 U$D and the modules themselves another 500 U$D at minimum (If you actually manage to get a public price, since the vendors for embedded stuff works on custom quotes only). I don't actually know either whenever Carrier Boards are universal or not since manufacturers seems to only consider compatibility with their own parts. From a price standpoint it makes ZERO sense.
The point is that you could theorically get inside a standard desktop Case an ATX Carrier Board that could use both Intel and AMD Processors in their own daughterboards and have cross vendor compatibility similar to Socket 7. Seems like the sort of thing that may make sense for a Youtuber doing videos more than any practical purpose.
 
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A///

Golden Member
Feb 24, 2017
1,234
870
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Most likely you're thinking of Slockets, but these were for Intel PPro/P2/P3 era platforms. Those were to use Socket 370 or Socket 8 Processors (Pentium Pro) in Slot 1 Motherboards. Heck, there were also some Slot 1 to Slot 2 adapters so that you could put your cheap Pentium 2 in a Pentium 2 Xeon Motherboard. Which is the equivalent of SODIMM to DIMM adapters which currently exist, coming to think about it.
Very likely. I never came across one IRL back in those days and only came across it again in material about 10 years back while reading a computer restoration blog on computers before things became more standardized.
 

MadRat

Lifer
Oct 14, 1999
11,778
120
106
Very likely. I never came across one IRL back in those days and only came across it again in material about 10 years back while reading a computer restoration blog on computers before things became more standardized.
Oh, you missed out then. You could use a Slotket to run Pentium !!! in some boards that did not officially support it. Pentium !!! was surprisingly backwards compatible in places you would have never expected. The BIOS just identified it as an unknown Pentium with MMX support. Some were unlocked so it was easy to get quite a bit of performance out of those old Slot1 motherboards. And some of the original dual-CPU motherboards in Slot1 flavors sporting Intel Northbridge chipsets were extremely favorable over 3rd party chipset boards. The 3rd party Northbridges tended to be much higher latency in comparison. You were truly rocking it to be dual CPU back then.
 

A///

Golden Member
Feb 24, 2017
1,234
870
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Oh, you missed out then. You could use a Slotket to run Pentium !!! in some boards that did not officially support it. Pentium !!! was surprisingly backwards compatible in places you would have never expected. The BIOS just identified it as an unknown Pentium with MMX support. Some were unlocked so it was easy to get quite a bit of performance out of those old Slot1 motherboards. And some of the original dual-CPU motherboards in Slot1 flavors sporting Intel Northbridge chipsets were extremely favorable over 3rd party chipset boards. The 3rd party Northbridges tended to be much higher latency in comparison. You were truly rocking it to be dual CPU back then.
On the contrary, I had tons of fun dealing with bad hardware back in those days.
 
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