i5 3570... to K or not to K?

CRaul87

Junior Member
Nov 23, 2012
18
0
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#1
Ok so I had time to think and decided I'm going to be heading towards the Intel platform for my next PC: http://www.pcgarage.ro/vizualizare-wishlist/604308/
However I still have some questions regarding this build witch keep in mind is at the absolute limit of my budget... :(

So you can see I opted for the i5 3570k there but when I look at the H61 chipset specs for my MB I see CPU OC is not supported: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LGA_1155 witch begs the question: is the extra money for the k version justified?
Also I wanted to ask about the MB that I picked: can it support the turbo and normal clocks of the i5 or will it run at just one clock speed? do I need the latest chipset for that?
 

NTMBK

Diamond Member
Nov 14, 2011
8,171
148
126
#2
Not worth it at all. Save the cash if you can't overclock it.
 

sm625

Diamond Member
May 6, 2011
8,176
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#3
Do you have the option of a more OC friendly motherboard? If delidding is something you are interested in, or might be interested in down the road, you should get a motherboard that can OC to 4.9GHz now.
 

CRaul87

Junior Member
Nov 23, 2012
18
0
66
#4
In this buid: http://www.pcgarage.ro/vizualizare-wishlist/604344/ I managed to add a Q77 board that can support CPU OC but at the expense of the new PSU witch means I'd have to use my 6 year old Gigabyte 450W PSU (will that be enough for the new system and possibly alow for a GPU upgrade in the future such a 7850?)

Also when I look at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LGA_1155 I see there is a "difference" in the OC capabilities of the Q77<<CPU(Bclk) + GPU>> vs the Z75/77<<CPU + GPU + RAM>>

Also the new Q77 MB only supports up to 1600MHz DDR3... should I downgrade to that from the 1833 or keep the later as I would need it for OC-ing?
 

Eureka

Diamond Member
Sep 6, 2005
3,828
0
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#5
If the Gigabyte can deliver 450W continuously it can power an i5 overclock with one GPU. IB chips and the newest GPUs are power sippers and you'd be surprised how little power they use.

Can you not find a Z77 board? It can overclock the IB chips and support higher RAM speeds... it's definitely worthwhile since a 3570k can get up to 4.5ghz easily.
 

Insert_Nickname

Diamond Member
May 6, 2012
3,435
87
126
#6
Well, the BIG difference between the 3570 and the 3570K is that the former only has HD2500 iGPU. The 3570K has the HD4000. But if you plan to use a discrete GFX card, that will not matter... :)

Also, about the chipset. Spend the few bucks more and get a B75-based board. The H61 only supports SATA2 and does not have a native USB3 controller. Although some H61 boards have a 3rd party controller.
 
Feb 20, 2001
17,654
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#7
imo it's not worth it to upgrage to k.
 

CRaul87

Junior Member
Nov 23, 2012
18
0
66
#8
ok, I think I managed to squeeze the build within budged although I had to let go a new case and psu along the way http://www.pcgarage.ro/vizualizare-wishlist/604380/
I think this one should work well and leave me room for OCing in the future.
And yes I do plan on using a discrete GPU
 

Denithor

Diamond Member
Apr 11, 2004
6,302
0
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#9
How much difference is there between a K and a non-K model?

If noticeable, get the Z77M you picked out and a non-K 3570. Those can be overclocked to 4.2GHz on all four cores with nearly no effort (simply enter BIOS, select all cores, set multiplier to 42 - you're done).
 

Idontcare

Elite Member
Oct 10, 1999
21,126
0
0
#10
For 3570k when not using the iGPU, the ram speed is not critical by any means. DDR3-1600 or 1866 or 2133...won't matter, your performance will be pretty much the same provided you running in dual-channel mode.

If you can save some money in ram by dropping down to DDR3-1600, and use the extra to buy a slightly larger SSD (60GB is on the hairy edge of being not enough for OS an apps), then I think you will be happier with the more balanced system

450W PSU should be enough unless you intend to put a powerful GPU in there.



At 4.9GHz my 3770k peaked at ~180W, but the PSU was pulling 250W from the wall (the mobo uses around 30W including ram, chipset, SSD) and that was with a GTX460 that was in 3D mode but not loaded.

I would be comfortable running a 4.9GHz 3770k with a fully loaded GTX460 on a 450W PSU - keep in mind the 180W power number for the CPU is when the CPU is fully loaded with LinX...something you wouldn't be doing while gaming or even when not gaming, so it is absolute worst case scenario and even then a 450W PSU would still be adequate.

So you will be fine. Also it looks like you intend to use the stock HSF anyways, which means you aren't going to be OC'ing to such high levels. You can get to 4.2GHz with the stock HSF though, which is plenty of CPU power.

 

CRaul87

Junior Member
Nov 23, 2012
18
0
66
#11
Yeah, actually the only reason I wanted to get and SSD was so that it would be easier to maintain the data from my current hdd without having to repartition or move stuff around too much as I will have to install the 64bit version of Win7 with this new build. (Obviously SSD brings many more advantages but I'm still stuck in the "caveman" era of IT when SSD didn't exist:p )

I can't really go any bigger on the SSD, I'm at the limit of my budget so I just wanted it for the OS + 1 or 2 programs... nothing more... maybe just OS and nothing more and I will store everything else on my HDD

Yes I do plan on using the stock cooler cuz of the budget and GPU wise I want to upgrade to a 7850 in the near future maybe or something else if it takes longer prob from AMD since they tend to have lower power consumtion.
 

Idontcare

Elite Member
Oct 10, 1999
21,126
0
0
#13

Eureka

Diamond Member
Sep 6, 2005
3,828
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#14
IIRC the difference between 1866 to 1600 was about 1 fps in video game benchmarks, if that (note benchmarks are known to vary 2-3 fps with the same exact settings). That being said, I've seen 1866 ram for cheap, maybe a few dollars of difference. Don't see why you would have to get 1600 ram.
 

Idontcare

Elite Member
Oct 10, 1999
21,126
0
0
#15
IIRC the difference between 1866 to 1600 was about 1 fps in video game benchmarks, if that (note benchmarks are known to vary 2-3 fps with the same exact settings). That being said, I've seen 1866 ram for cheap, maybe a few dollars of difference. Don't see why you would have to get 1600 ram.
He's not buying from Newegg in N.America.
 

Eureka

Diamond Member
Sep 6, 2005
3,828
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#16
Woops. In that case, yeah the small difference is definitely not worth the increase in price.
 

CRaul87

Junior Member
Nov 23, 2012
18
0
66
#17
OK, back with another question that might or might not make everything so far a bit irrelevant but here it goes:

I was saying a few posts back that I would also like to a add a HD 7850 to the system down the line but it turns out that due to budget restraints that might not be possible so it got me thinking if I should go for the i5 3750k w/ my old HD 5670 or buy a new HD 7850 and couple it w/ something that would equal roughly the same price overall such as a Pentium G860...

So as a summary:
i5 3750k + HD 5670 ?
or
G860 + HD 7850 ?

My main uses for this system would be music production: Cubase/Pro Tools/Reaper sort of software and MMO gaming, more specifically Guild Wars 2 witch seems to be quite a CPU hog!
 

Denithor

Diamond Member
Apr 11, 2004
6,302
0
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#18
My vote would be i5 + 5670 with the intent to upgrade to 7850 (or whatever is good price/performance when you get around to it) later. Most of your applications are going to benefit significantly from more CPU versus GPU. Plus - it's much, much easier to upgrade to a new GPU in 6-12 months (as finances allow) instead of upgrading the CPU (and potentially more) later.
 

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