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i3 6100 vs i5 4460 for autocad ineventor

cybersys

Junior Member
Dec 29, 2015
17
0
0
Hello guys. I want to buy a budget cpu/mobo/ram. I have 2 options:
core i5 4460 + ASRock H81M-GL LGA1150 + 16 gigabyte DDR3 1600
or
core i3 6100 + ASUS H110M-C LGA1151 + 16 gigabyte DDR4 2133
those are most the same price where I live.
I want to use it for autocad and autocad inventor. I'm not interested in gaming. Which one do you suggest?
Thank you.
Sorry for my english.
 

AtenRa

Lifer
Feb 2, 2009
13,358
2,187
126
Depending of what areas of the AutoCAD you going to use, you could go for a Z170 board with Core i3 6100 OC to 4.4GHz and 2666MHz ram for maximum singlethread performance. OR, if you use more the areas that are multi-threaded then get the Core i5.


https://knowledge.autodesk.com/support/autocad/troubleshooting/caas/sfdcarticles/sfdcarticles/Support-for-multi-core-processors-with-AutoCAD.html

Support for multi-core processors with AutoCAD

Oct 21 2015


Applies to AutoCAD 2010, AutoCAD 2011, AutoCAD 2012, AutoCAD 2013, AutoCAD 2014, AutoCAD 2015, AutoCAD 2016, AutoCAD Architecture 2010, AutoCAD Architecture 2011, AutoCAD Architecture 2012, AutoCAD Architecture 2013, AutoCAD Architecture 2014, AutoCAD Architecture 2015, AutoCAD Architecture 2016, AutoCAD Civil 2010, ...

Issue:

Your computer has a multi-core processor, and you have noticed that the acad.exe process does not use 100% of your available CPU resources. You want to know if AutoCAD supports multi-core processors.
Solution:

AutoCAD only supports multi-core technology in specific areas of the product, including:

  • 2D regeneration
  • MentalRay rendering
To fully benefit from multi-core processors, you need to use multi-threaded software; AutoCAD is predominantly a single-threaded application.
Also for AutoCAD Inventor

https://knowledge.autodesk.com/support/inventor-products/troubleshooting/caas/sfdcarticles/sfdcarticles/Support-for-multi-core-processors.html

Solution:

You are using a computer with a multi-core processor, and you have noticed that the Inventor.exe process does not use 100% of your available CPU resources. You want to know if Autodesk® Inventor™ supports multi-core processors.

Autodesk Inventor 2009 and later versions support multi-core technology in some very specific areas of the product, including:

  • Animations and renderings in Studio
  • ASM (Autodesk Shape Manager) kernel
  • Task Scheduler
In release 2012 we added multi-core processing capability for

  • Ray tracing
  • Hidden line calculation in drawings (when the Enable background updates checkbox in the Application Options > Drawing tab is checked. It is on by default)
In release 2013 we added multi-core processing capability for

  • Stress Analysis (no special options or settings are required)
In order to fully benefit from multi-core processors, you need to use multi-threaded software. Unfortunately, Inventor is currently a single-threaded application.
 

VirtualLarry

Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
48,404
5,101
126
Depending of what areas of the AutoCAD you going to use, you could go for a Z170 board with Core i3 6100 OC to 4.4GHz and 2666MHz ram for maximum singlethread performance. OR, if you use more the areas that are multi-threaded then get the Core i5.
Irrespective of whether OCing a work PC is wise - OP will need a discrete GPU too if he goes the BCLK OC route with SKL, adding to the cost. But yes, that would get you maximum single-threaded performance.
 

cybersys

Junior Member
Dec 29, 2015
17
0
0
Thank you guys. I'm not interested in overclocking, and z170 is out of my price range. This is an upgrade from more than 10 years old pc (Athlon XP and Windows XP). I'm newbie at autocad and inventor and they won't be upgraded for several years ahead. I'm still not sure which route I should go.
 

AtenRa

Lifer
Feb 2, 2009
13,358
2,187
126
Even without OC the Core i3 6100 is at 3.7GHz continuously on all cores when Core i5 4460 base at 3.2GHz and Turbo to a single core at 3.4GHz.

So I would say the Core i3 should be faster than the Core i5 in AutoCAD and you getting a newer platform in case you would like to upgrade later to a Core i7 6700K and perhaps Kabylake ??
 

ShintaiDK

Lifer
Apr 22, 2012
20,395
128
106
Never OC a work PC. You only OC when your data doesn't matter. And I dont want to hear any excuses from people who "think" they got stable OCs.
 

cybersys

Junior Member
Dec 29, 2015
17
0
0
Even without OC the Core i3 6100 is at 3.7GHz continuously on all cores when Core i5 4460 base at 3.2GHz and Turbo to a single core at 3.4GHz.

So I would say the Core i3 should be faster than the Core i5 in AutoCAD and you getting a newer platform in case you would like to upgrade later to a Core i7 6700K and perhaps Kabylake ??
I found a review of i3 6100 at pcgameshardware.de. There is comparison between i3 6100 and i5 4460. Their performances in games are almost identical, but there is a considerable difference in Lightroom 5.3 test. core i5 4460 scores 191 seconds, while core i3 is behind by 67 seconds. It takes 258 seconds to do the job.
http://www.pcgameshardware.de/Core-i3-6100-CPU-260945/Tests/Test-Review-1175063/

But maybe the performance of i3 would be better in autocad and inventor as you said. I'm still not sure.
 

Denithor

Diamond Member
Apr 11, 2004
6,302
23
81
I only have one question - do you plan to keep this machine for ten years like your last one apparently lasted? If so, I would lean toward the quad-core i5 instead of the dual-core i3. For the simple reason that although AutoCAD/Inventor are predominantly single-threaded today, they very easily could support multiple cores within the next several years.

Also, as you noticed, some other professional software (you referenced a Lightroom benchmark) is already optimized for multicore processors so you would see a big improvement in any of those programs right away if you happen to need to run them.
 

AtenRa

Lifer
Feb 2, 2009
13,358
2,187
126
Well, he can always upgrade to a Core i7 Skylake or even a Kabylake if the motherboard supports it in 2-3 years time.

Anyway the performance difference from his old Athlon X2 to Core i3 6100 in ST and in MT loads will be enormous.
 

cybersys

Junior Member
Dec 29, 2015
17
0
0
I only have one question - do you plan to keep this machine for ten years like your last one apparently lasted? If so, I would lean toward the quad-core i5 instead of the dual-core i3. For the simple reason that although AutoCAD/Inventor are predominantly single-threaded today, they very easily could support multiple cores within the next several years.

Also, as you noticed, some other professional software (you referenced a Lightroom benchmark) is already optimized for multicore processors so you would see a big improvement in any of those programs right away if you happen to need to run them.
Thank you. I may not keep it for 10 years! But for several years ahead it will not be upgraded. Your statement make sense. What do you think of i5-6400? It's almost the same price as i5-4460 here, $176 (i5-4460: $167).
 

cybersys

Junior Member
Dec 29, 2015
17
0
0
Well, he can always upgrade to a Core i7 Skylake or even a Kabylake if the motherboard supports it in 2-3 years time.

Anyway the performance difference from his old Athlon X2 to Core i3 6100 in ST and in MT loads will be enormous.
Thanks. It's Athlon Xp btw!
 

myocardia

Diamond Member
Jun 21, 2003
9,291
28
91
Cyber, always go with the newer/newest platform when building "from scratch", like you are doing. Why would you want a Haswell i5 (the 4460), when the newer Skylake i5 (the 6400) is less than $10 more? The answer is, you would not. BTW, any of those three processors will be 10-12x (1,000-1,200%) faster than your Athlon XP. You should buy at least 16GB of system RAM, btw.
 

DrMrLordX

Lifer
Apr 27, 2000
16,035
4,996
136
I agree! Those of the engineering or financial disciplines should not OC.
We did have someone in here - I forget who - running four instances of a single-threaded forex application on a heavily-overclocked QX6700, or something like that.
 

myocardia

Diamond Member
Jun 21, 2003
9,291
28
91
We did have someone in here - I forget who - running four instances of a single-threaded forex application on a heavily-overclocked QX6700, or something like that.
That was Idontcare. Don't you remember how we all panned him for giving Newegg $1,600 or $1,700 for the processor, which was "only" a $1,000 CPU, since he didn't want to wait a few weeks or a month, until the price came back down to 'normal'?
 

DrMrLordX

Lifer
Apr 27, 2000
16,035
4,996
136
Yes, I do remember that, I just forgot who exactly it was that got slammed for buying at those marked-up prices. The Egg was gouging like hell since the e-tailers that sold for $1400 or less all went out-of-stock very quickly.

Oh, and for what it's worth . . . go with the i3, OC or no. The evidence is clear that CAD applications will like that CPU more than the i5 with a lower clockspeed and older CPU generation.
 

MarkizSchnitzel

Senior member
Nov 10, 2013
377
20
81
I don't think any major CAD has any multithreading in drawing/exporting/converting.
I know it's a PITA to use CAD on my company old xeon server. VM with one newer xeon thread is noticeably faster.

So go for SKL i3.
 

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