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I think i just discovered that i like single player games better with the sound off

Naer

Diamond Member
Nov 28, 2013
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leaves more to the imagination instead of giving it all away. I hear sounds of what something might sound like in my mind. I'm listening to my own music on my android while playing a single player game on my laptop with the sound off. multiplayer games is a different story where you are bound by having to listen to play the game, otherwise you are at a disadvantage.

thoughts?
 

BSim500

Golden Member
Jun 5, 2013
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leaves more to the imagination instead of giving it all away. I hear sounds of what something might sound like in my mind. I'm listening to my own music on my android while playing a single player game on my laptop with the sound off. multiplayer games is a different story where you are bound by having to listen to play the game, otherwise you are at a disadvantage.

thoughts?
Different people have different tastes I guess. Personally, I don't see how many games are enjoyable like that. To start with, it's not just multi-player games that you need the sound on for being alerted to something. Stealth games like Thief or Styx are virtually unplayable (certainly far less immersive) with no sound. RTS's often alert you to something going on elsewhere on the map. Although many such games have visual alert features for deaf people, eg, in Age of Empires an attack on your unit elsewhere is both a trumpet sound and a visual alert on the mini-map, intentionally disabling it is not the same as a deaf gamer used to adapting everything out of necessity.

Likewise, I can't see how games with amazing soundtracks / acoustics like Bioshock, Dragon Age Origins, Elder Scrolls, Tropico, etc, by composers like Jeremy Soule, Inon Zur, Kirill Pokrovsky, etc, can be "enhanced" by a different set of music. Whatever music you enjoy whilst gaming is obviously down to personal taste, but personally I find "external music" always reduces rather than increases immersion unless the game has a particularly bad soundtrack. Even old-school point and click adventures had a great deal of "character" added to the game via a particularly good soundtrack (Grim Fandango, Sam & Max, Day Of The Tentacle, The 7th Guest, etc). Doubly so where the music already "fits" perfectly or is contextual in some way, eg, 60's soundtrack for NOLF, "L'Homme Que J'Adore", etc, for 1940's occupied-France "The Saboteur", Egyptian styled tracks for Serious Sam, "Daddy's Little Girl" in Bioshock 2, "Will the Circle be Unbroken" in Bioshock Infinite, etc. Or music that changes according to enemy AI state (normal, suspicious, alerted, attack, etc) or a slightly muted version during night vs day transitions (Don't Starve) or perhaps two different upbeat vs downbeat versions of the same track changes for an ending given the world state (eg, a Dishonored style good vs bad ending depending on how many people you've killed).

And what about missing out most of the verbal humor in games like Portal? Although you can still read what is said via the subtitles, you'd still be missing out on how it gets said, eg, how Glados speaks, the "I will decorate my hallways with your carcass" taunting of Shodan in SS2, the increasingly unhinged religious "sermons" from "Father" Karras throughout the 90min long final level of Thief 2, or that scene in Bioshock where the "fly away little moth!" 'perfect crazy voice' Sander Cohen attacks you to the tune of "Waltz of the Flowers" would just lose half of what makes the acoustics in such games memorable or unique vs the same generic "dubstep" of every other FPS.
 
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EXCellR8

Diamond Member
Sep 1, 2010
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I played Dark Forces as a kid for years with no sound... but only because I had no idea how to make it work.

I think I've also played a few other corridor shooters with nothing but music blasting in the background.
 

Concillian

Diamond Member
May 26, 2004
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Years ago I played this hover / rocket car racing game Wipeout XL without sound in college. Always played it with The Prodigy "Music from a Jilted Generation" CD in in the CD player. Music was well suited to that kind of game. Some time later I played the CD by itself on the stereo and my roommate was so confused as to why I was playing the soundtrack to that game on the stereo.

Some games are well suited for that. Or games that you've heard the sound 100 times and don't really want to hear again (like Darkest Dungeon. Yes the audio is well done and Wayne June sounds great telling me that 'overconfidence is a slow and insidious killer' but it does get old after a while.)
 

amenx

Platinum Member
Dec 17, 2004
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Sound is essential for immersion imo. I think I would get bored pretty quick sound-less.
 

Red Hawk

Diamond Member
Jan 1, 2011
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No can do. A key part of a great game for me is the score. Sound design and voice acting are also important. If a game isn't decent at any of that, then I'm probably not playing it to begin with.
 
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Stg-Flame

Diamond Member
Mar 10, 2007
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In the past, I used to keep Windows Media Player going non-stop while I'd play single player games, but that was back in the late 90s and early 2000s before games utilized positional audio or really tried for immersion through ambient sounds. Games like Unreal Tournament, Warcraft 2/Brood Wars/TA/every other RTS made in this time I could easily play while just listening to music. Hell, sometimes I would just zone out playing Bejeweled 2 Endless Mode with my music playing in the background (great way to take your mind off things).

Now, I need my sound and since I normally listen to music all day at work, I don't want to come home and listen to more music.
 

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