I hate freaking out...

igor_kavinski

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Jul 27, 2020
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But I just did that. Second time in my 41+ years, felt an earthquake aftershock. Epicenter happens to be in Iran. I thought I was getting nauseous and close to fainting. Then it registered in my brain that I got this feeling almost 15 years ago. Except, back then, it was my bed rocking forward and backward, almost like a baby's cradle. This time, it was sideways motion. My head felt like a pendulum. All the occupants of my 17th floor flat gathered in the living room. The chandelier was rocking a bit. Flat owner joked that this is one of the benefits of a chandelier. Good earthquake detector to rule out the possibility of imagining things.
 
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pete6032

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Dec 3, 2010
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Just have some all natural honey and you will be OK. 7 hours sleep without needing to pee, even during an earthquake.
 
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Red Squirrel

No Lifer
May 24, 2003
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I can't say I've ever felt a full blown earthquake before, it must be a really weird thing.

Once in a while I do feel a blast and that is an odd feeling too but its very quick and more like "wtf was that?".

Typically I don't feel/hear the mine ones but I heard one caused by a concrete company while back. It felt very local, was like a small bang originating from the basement. The actual blast was like maybe 20km or so away.
 

Captante

Lifer
Oct 20, 2003
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So.... if there really WAS an earthquake that means you didn't actually freak out?

So it's actually GOOD news?? :oops: :p


(glad you're okay!)
 
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igor_kavinski

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UAE residents report strong tremors after multiple earthquakes kill at least 5 in Iran - News | Khaleej Times

As many as eight earthquakes hit southern Iran on Saturday, ranging from a magnitude of 4.2 to 6.3, according to the UAE's National Center of Meteorology (NCM). Two of the quakes measured 6.3 according to the authority, striking at 1.32am and 3.24am respectively, and these were the ones felt by residents. The earthquakes, however, did not have any further effect in the UAE, it said.
That was the one I felt. The other one, I was awake at the time but didn't feel anything so probably the shockwaves were in a different direction.
 

Spacehead

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Jun 2, 2002
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Glad you're ok Igor.

My brother was near San Francisco for the 1989 one that happened just before the World Series game. I just rememeber him telling me "you don't ever, EVER, want to be in an earthquake!" He was pretty scared.

I've only ever felt one. I could feel the floor shake for just a second or 2. Usually when there's one near enough for people to feel here it's centered in Ohio.
 
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igor_kavinski

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It's not just the shaking. It's the low grade seismic vibration that's pretty unnerving. Maybe I'm too sensitive to such seismic waves. In a stronger earthquake, I doubt my brain would be able to think fast enough to act quickly due to the nauseating feeling. It was focused at the top of the back of my head. That's the parietal lobe. I also get pretty bad motion sickness. Not to mention, I've had this fall on my head in 2008 or 2009:

1656758327559.png

I'm lucky that my skull didn't crack.
 
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igor_kavinski

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The actual blast was like maybe 20km or so away.
Blast in kfc and hardees Abu Dhabi- maybe cylinder burst - #explosion in #kfc #Abu Dhabi - YouTube

This blast was about the same distance away from where I work but it was pretty loud. I think even the windows rattled with the sound of the explosion. Gas cylinder blast destroyed both Hardees and KFC. This was right after the day UAE and Israel came to an understanding where UAE accepted Israel as a nation. Some say it was a terrorist attack to send a message. Still, the timing of it is just curious.
 
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Greenman

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I can't say I've ever felt a full blown earthquake before, it must be a really weird thing.

Once in a while I do feel a blast and that is an odd feeling too but its very quick and more like "wtf was that?".

Typically I don't feel/hear the mine ones but I heard one caused by a concrete company while back. It felt very local, was like a small bang originating from the basement. The actual blast was like maybe 20km or so away.
It's actually surprisingly frightening. The world suddenly doesn't make sense as everything is shaking.
 
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deadlyapp

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Apr 25, 2004
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I've been through several. I was only 1 years old for the 1989 quake but remember it (I was living near eureka at the time). Have been through a few good sized ones when I lived in Washington (6.8 in 2001 was the biggest). Don't remember any large ones in Cali when I moved back (2006 to 2018).
 
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Captante

Lifer
Oct 20, 2003
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Been through a couple small ones while visiting a friend in LA and a slightly larger tremor in Seattle when I was a kid ... if you've never felt one before there's nothing quite like it.

Lets just say you'll never look at "solid" ground the same way again! :oops:
 

BoomerD

No Lifer
Feb 26, 2006
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Glad you're ok Igor.

My brother was near San Francisco for the 1989 one that happened just before the World Series game. I just rememeber him telling me "you don't ever, EVER, want to be in an earthquake!" He was pretty scared.

I've only ever felt one. I could feel the floor shake for just a second or 2. Usually when there's one near enough for people to feel here it's centered in Ohio.
We were maybe 80 miles (as the crow flies) from the epicenter of that Loma Prieta quake. Scary as hell. Ran outside to see where our kids were...the asphalt parking lot was rolling just like waves in the ocean... Cars were bouncing up and down like a bunch of low riders.
A few minutes after the shaking stopped, I got called into work. (On call crane) equipment operator for an irrigation/electrical utility)
 
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VirtualLarry

No Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
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We have had a few relatively minor quakes here in New England. It's mainly Hurricanes and the occasional rare Tornado that we have to watch out for.
 

igor_kavinski

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Jul 27, 2020
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My main fear with an earthquake is not dying. Rather, it's being trapped alive under rubble. I read about some woman who was trapped for 20 days. By the time she was rescued, she had been reduced to a sad looking ghastly thin ghost. I don't know if she survived but by the looks of it, she seemed to be past the stage where anyone would be able to get her body to be normal again, since it had entered the autophagy stage where the body stops accepting food and just feeds on muscles and tissue.

EDIT: It was more than two months! :eek:

 

njdevilsfan87

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Apr 19, 2007
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I've woken up to a few small quakes here in CA, and it's been terrifying every single time. Mostly because I go from not really knowing what's going on to suddenly knowing and fearing that it will escalate. There was in particular where we were maybe a mile away from the epicenter of a magnitude 3.6 quake, and the apartment we were in felt like it was made of jello while it was happening. We now live in a SFH home on a solid foundation and similar happened - larger quake but further away from the epicenter, and the same "walls and floors made of jello" feeling.

I really fear what something like a magnitude 7 or greater may feel like.
 
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Torn Mind

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I experienced one earthquake. It was the same that damaged the Washington phallic symbol...I mean obelisk...I mean monument....
It had trouble elevating itself ever since....
 

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
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But I just did that. Second time in my 41+ years, felt an earthquake aftershock. Epicenter happens to be in Iran. I thought I was getting nauseous and close to fainting. Then it registered in my brain that I got this feeling almost 15 years ago. Except, back then, it was my bed rocking forward and backward, almost like a baby's cradle. This time, it was sideways motion. My head felt like a pendulum. All the occupants of my 17th floor flat gathered in the living room. The chandelier was rocking a bit. Flat owner joked that this is one of the benefits of a chandelier. Good earthquake detector to rule out the possibility of imagining things.
IIRC, Iran has had some gigantic earthquakes. Where I live a pretty monster quake could happen any time. I am right now exactly where I was during the Loma Prieta earthquake of 1989. I don't remember feeling sick or freaking out. It was pretty alarming. An overpass (the Cypress Structure) collapsed about 4 miles from here and maybe 20 people died right there.

I do feel small EQs here occasionally. I don't need a chandelier to tell me if it's just my imagination. I've read some very interesting books on earthquakes. Most fascinating are the monstrous ones, like the Lisbon 1755 or the 1920 in China. Japan has had many monstrous quakes including pretty recently.

Earthquakes have much variety, not just the intensity. The depth of the epicenter is important as well as the geography of the region. Usually it takes a few seconds for the intensity to build for a large earthquake, perhaps something like 20 seconds. Then the really intense ones keep on going for up to a minute, sometimes more. Then there are the aftershocks, which can come at any time and aftershocks can keep coming for days, weeks, months. The aftershocks are usually smaller than the initial quake, but frequently not by much and sometimes the aftershocks are equal or greater than the initial earthquake. Given that it usually takes some seconds for the intensity to build you generally have a moment to situate yourself for safety, duck under a table or something or even run outside, possibly. It's one reason they have invested in earthquake warning systems. I have an app driven by one installed on my smartphones. People who live in areas of great seismicity often have some ideas on how to protect themselves. After a major quake, for one thing, they are antsy, run outside at the hint of a tremor or refuse to stay inside at all while aftershocks are a thing, if possible, if they inhabit structures that might collapse.

With giant earthquakes, in particular the ones with epicenter under the ocean, the concern isn't just everything shaken, disrupted and destroyed by the tremors, there's the ensuing tsunami, sometimes traveling thousands of miles across the ocean at high speed. Once reaching shallower water the speed decreases but the height of the wave increases. Maybe you've seen some of the video of tsunamis charging inland. I'm sure you can see some on Youtube. I saw some video of a tsunami hitting the coast of Japan within the last 20 years that looked like CGI.
 
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