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I can already see the Right Of Way disputes

Lost_in_the_HTTP

Diamond Member
Nov 17, 2019
3,548
1,962
96
Environment

PG&E Will Bury 10,000 Miles of Power Lines So They Don't Spark Wildfires


July 21, 2021 • Pacific Gas & Electric expects to spend at least $15 billion on the effort to prevent its fraying grid from igniting trees and other vegetation across drought-stricken California.



You ain't gonna dig up my fancy lawn!!!!
 

cytg111

Lifer
Mar 17, 2008
16,709
6,516
136
Well its probably harder to siphon power from those new insulated under ground cables.
 

Greenman

Lifer
Oct 15, 1999
17,641
2,782
126
They already have the right of way. The $284 dollar a foot price tag seems a bit steep, but since PG&E isn't paying for it they probably don't care.
 
Dec 10, 2005
21,211
2,784
126
They're called easements and good luck blocking them.
People have already weaponized environmental review laws to try and block conversions of car lanes in cities into bike/bus lanes. I wouldn't be surprised if some disgruntled person tried to use a similar approach here. It likely won't be successful, but it could still lead to delays.
 

Franz316

Senior member
Sep 12, 2000
890
236
116
Can they use the same cable or will it all need replaced with something insulated in a pipe? I would guess they need to leave the existing cables in place while they work. This seems like a massive undertaking but worthwhile.
 

dank69

Lifer
Oct 6, 2009
28,815
12,407
136
Can they use the same cable or will it all need replaced with something insulated in a pipe? I would guess they need to leave the existing cables in place while they work. This seems like a massive undertaking but worthwhile.
Should have been done a long time ago everywhere.
 

JTsyo

Lifer
Nov 18, 2007
10,973
242
106
Environment

PG&E Will Bury 10,000 Miles of Power Lines So They Don't Spark Wildfires


July 21, 2021 • Pacific Gas & Electric expects to spend at least $15 billion on the effort to prevent its fraying grid from igniting trees and other vegetation across drought-stricken California.



You ain't gonna dig up my fancy lawn!!!!
It's to prevent wildfires, right? So this won't be people yards, it'll mostly be government owned land.
 

Amol S.

Golden Member
Mar 14, 2015
1,314
281
136
New York City had it's wiring below ground since I do not know when. The only requirement to make the end result good, is to ensure that the wires are placed underground in a hollow conduit of concrete. Otherwise there could be a short and mass power outage everytime it rains hard.
 

Moonbeam

Elite Member
Nov 24, 1999
67,486
4,159
126
Can they run air conditioning pipes from Antarctica and water from the melting glaciers?
 

dank69

Lifer
Oct 6, 2009
28,815
12,407
136
Can they run air conditioning pipes from Antarctica and water from the melting glaciers?
I'm already snapping up all the prime real estate down there. The parts that will remain once the ice is gone.
 

Jhhnn

No Lifer
Nov 11, 1999
62,303
14,509
136
It's utterly impractical to bury high voltage transmission cables in steep rocky terrain. A lot of pylons in remote locations are actually set with helicopters. The roads to bring in necessary equipment are temporary & turn into Jeep trails over the years. A former co-worker had worked in the industry & kept a short section of 6" dia underground cable on his toolbox, like this-

 

BoomerD

No Lifer
Feb 26, 2006
57,404
5,753
126
Can they use the same cable or will it all need replaced with something insulated in a pipe? I would guess they need to leave the existing cables in place while they work. This seems like a massive undertaking but worthwhile.
Overhead wires are just bare copper alloy. The underground cables are heavily insulated and shielded/grounded...and have to be in conduit.

I worked for an electrical utility in NorCal for several years...often using a crane to help the underground crews pull wire in new subdivisions.
 

Zorba

Diamond Member
Oct 22, 1999
9,998
4,019
136
Overhead wires are just bare copper alloy. The underground cables are heavily insulated and shielded/grounded...and have to be in conduit.

I worked for an electrical utility in NorCal for several years...often using a crane to help the underground crews pull wire in new subdivisions.
Around here the overhead cables are Aluminum. I think that is the standard pretty much everywhere. Much less cost and weight.

There is one high voltage line outside of Tulsa that is copper, built during Vietnam when aluminum was hard to come by. You can pretty easily tell from the ground if you know to look. My grandfather used to be a lead transmission line engineer for PSO.
 

Moonbeam

Elite Member
Nov 24, 1999
67,486
4,159
126
I'm already snapping up all the prime real estate down there. The parts that will remain once the ice is gone.
Now aren't you full of inuituity. No worries, though. It's a good thing to have a sham'an being bipolar.
 

BoomerD

No Lifer
Feb 26, 2006
57,404
5,753
126
Around here the overhead cables are Aluminum. I think that is the standard pretty much everywhere. Much less cost and weight.

There is one high voltage line outside of Tulsa that is copper, built during Vietnam when aluminum was hard to come by. You can pretty easily tell from the ground if you know to look. My grandfather used to be a lead transmission line engineer for PSO.
I see that most are aluminum/steel. Makes sense. I'm still sure the primary (12kv)were a copper alloy back in the 80's and early 90's. The actual"HIGH VOLTAGE) transmission lines were some kind of aluminum back then.
 

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