Hypothetical question regarding shipping without insurance.

codeyf

Lifer
Sep 6, 2000
11,854
3
81
I just shipped off a Strut Tower bar to a guy on another forum. For those that don't work on cars or have no idea what that is, it's about a 3 foot long aluminum bar with brackets on the end of it.

Anyway, I shipped it yesterday via 1st class, no insurance, just DC on it. He emailed me asking if I had insured it, as a friend of his had a part stolen out of a box and they just received the empty box. The way I packaged it, the box tapers in the middle due to the bar being small in thickness. So for someone to steal it from the box, they would literally need to tear the box apart to get it out.

If that happened, i'm assuming USPS wouldn't still deliver a obviously torn apart piece of cardboard. But, if this guy comes back and tries to claim this was done AFTER it was delivered, am I still liable? Or is once the intact box leaves the possesion of USPS my liability is then relieved?

I'm assuming insurance is there for coverage for damage/loss in transit to the recipient. Once they get it, whatever happens to it is their loss.

Now I'm just trying to prepare myself should this guy try to pull something. I didn't insure it based on 2 things.

1: It's a heavy duty aluminum bar with aluminum brackets. Damage to it is not an issue as it's built to withstand the pressures of the twisting chassis of a car.
2: The box would litterally need to be completely opened/cut in order to get it out. You can't just open an end and slip it out.

Based on the above, I'm thinking i'm fine unless #2 happens while it's in the possesion of USPS.

Your thoughts are appreciated!
 

notfred

Lifer
Feb 12, 2001
38,241
4
0
Have you ever shipped car parts before? Typically, the box is barely there upon arival. I Had some exhasut pipes shipped to me, and they were halfway out of the torn up box when I got them. I shipped a tranny to someone, and it was sticking out the side of the box when he got it. Car parts rarely stay in the box when being shipped, they're too heavy and thrown around too much.
 

vi edit

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Oct 28, 1999
62,387
8,154
126
See, that's the nice thing about insuring and then certifying something - they have to sign to get it. If you are THAT worried about something being tampered with on the recipients end, certify the package and then you get a return receipt showing that they accepted it.

Keeps people honest. THey wouldn't accept a package that didn't have a part in it, so there is no risk of them claiming that it was empty without looking over the package first.
 

codeyf

Lifer
Sep 6, 2000
11,854
3
81
Originally posted by: notfred
Have you ever shipped car parts before? Typically, the box is barely there upon arival. I Had some exhasut pipes shipped to me, and they were halfway out of the torn up box when I got them. I shipped a tranny to someone, and it was sticking out the side of the box when he got it. Car parts rarely stay in the box when being shipped, they're too heavy and thrown around too much.

The box is less than 3 feet long, 6 inches high, and 3 inches thick at the ends. Weighs less than 4 pounds. Also enough tape on it to "hold" half of an average high school freshman class to a post ;)

Also, the box he was telling me about that had been tampered with contained a front underbody lip/spoiler. So much bigger and i'm sure a bit heavier. The box I shipped was comparable in size to a poster tube.
 

iamwiz82

Lifer
Jan 10, 2001
30,772
13
81
i have had one package ripped open and the contents lost. USPS sent me back the packaging with a form to fill out to see if they could find it again. Never heard back.
 

Krye

Senior member
Aug 26, 2001
298
0
0
Once the package is delivered you should no longer be liable. Insurance protects the package ONLY while in transit. That's why many packages have a label on them that state not to accept delivery until inspected if the package is mangled.
 

vegetation

Diamond Member
Feb 21, 2001
4,270
2
0
Next time, just charge them for the insurance. The only time you, as the seller, ever have to file a USPS insurance claim is if the package was never delivered. Any other situation involves the recipient filing a claim. If they want to file a false report, then so be it.
 

codeyf

Lifer
Sep 6, 2000
11,854
3
81
Originally posted by: vegetation
Next time, just charge them for the insurance. The only time you, as the seller, ever have to file a USPS insurance claim is if the package was never delivered. Any other situation involves the recipient filing a claim. If they want to file a false report, then so be it.

Good info. Will do in the future. I just want to be sure should this guy try and pull some shizz on me.