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Hydroplaned tonight for the first time

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Yreka

Diamond Member
Jul 6, 2005
4,084
0
76
Originally posted by: Safeway
When it is sheet raining, the drivers in Texas freak out and start going 30mph on the highway.
Its better than what goes on here.

People continue buisness as usual 80-90 mph until they crash into each other..

Then everyone behind them gets to go .5 MPH
 

spidey07

No Lifer
Aug 4, 2000
65,481
4
76
Hydroplaning is no joke. Even with really good tires you can hydroplane at 45 Mph. 65+ is WAY too fast for heavy rain with the possiblity for standing water. Slow down to 40 and put on your hazard lights.
 

Vonkhan

Diamond Member
Feb 27, 2003
8,199
0
71
Hydroplaned while heading down a T-intersection (river on the other side)

as the car spun thru the intersection

the only thought that went thru my head was ...

"damn, I'm going to die before I get to play Half Life 2"
 

SVT Cobra

Lifer
Mar 29, 2005
13,264
1
0
Also might I mention never drive on summer tires in 4inches of powder and slush in a RWD car with lots of torque, that was a fun experience this year.
 

DaWhim

Lifer
Feb 3, 2003
12,986
1
81
Originally posted by: J0hnny
How were you able to regain control once you started skidding? Did you let go of the brakes and go with the skid?
I was going straight on the left lane when that happened. It was 2am in the morning. When that happened, I turned my wheel slightly toward right to get back on the center lane and braked a little.

I have drove through storm like this and never hydroplane. I guess it has to do with my tires.
 

SVT Cobra

Lifer
Mar 29, 2005
13,264
1
0
Originally posted by: DaWhim
Originally posted by: J0hnny
How were you able to regain control once you started skidding? Did you let go of the brakes and go with the skid?
I was going straight on the left lane when that happened. It was 2am in the morning. When that happened, I turned my wheel slightly toward right to get back on the center lane and braked a little.

I have drove through storm like this and never hydroplane. I guess it has to do with my tires.
So it wasn't your skill it was most likely not a bad hydo plane. When hydroplaning, or losing control period in a street type situation you don't lift your foot off the gas, and you don't brake, nor do your counter steer until you can get grip again if possible.
 

Raduque

Lifer
Aug 22, 2004
13,133
133
106
Originally posted by: SVT Cobra
Originally posted by: DaWhim
Originally posted by: J0hnny
How were you able to regain control once you started skidding? Did you let go of the brakes and go with the skid?
I was going straight on the left lane when that happened. It was 2am in the morning. When that happened, I turned my wheel slightly toward right to get back on the center lane and braked a little.

I have drove through storm like this and never hydroplane. I guess it has to do with my tires.
So it wasn't your skill it was most likely not a bad hydo plane. When hydroplaning, or losing control period in a street type situation you don't lift your foot off the gas, and you don't brake, nor do your counter steer until you can get grip again if possible.
Yea, pretty much anything you do will upset the car even more. Until you have traction again, you're pretty much a passenger.

Oh and SVT, yea torque + snow = fun :D
 

SVT Cobra

Lifer
Mar 29, 2005
13,264
1
0
Originally posted by: Raduque
Originally posted by: SVT Cobra
Originally posted by: DaWhim
Originally posted by: J0hnny
How were you able to regain control once you started skidding? Did you let go of the brakes and go with the skid?
I was going straight on the left lane when that happened. It was 2am in the morning. When that happened, I turned my wheel slightly toward right to get back on the center lane and braked a little.

I have drove through storm like this and never hydroplane. I guess it has to do with my tires.
So it wasn't your skill it was most likely not a bad hydo plane. When hydroplaning, or losing control period in a street type situation you don't lift your foot off the gas, and you don't brake, nor do your counter steer until you can get grip again if possible.
Yea, pretty much anything you do will upset the car even more. Until you have traction again, you're pretty much a passenger.

Oh and SVT, yea torque + snow = fun :D
Drifting through intersections filled with cars and a cop staring at you as you try to pull out of a parking lot but go sideways instead = not fun. :(
 

clickynext

Platinum Member
Dec 24, 2004
2,583
0
0
I have relatively wide, flat tires that really suck in the rain so it happens to me all the time. I've just learned to drive slow in the rain, slow down before curves, and avoid large puddles as much as possible.
 

Shadowknight

Diamond Member
May 4, 2001
3,959
3
81
What was scary for me was when driving to my parents house on Christmas day (it's a 2.5 hour trip), for no reason my car almost pulled a complete 360. The roads where dry, they were in good shape with no furrows in them from heavy traffic, I wasn't speeding (it was a 55mph zone), and the tire looked fine afterwards. I was lucky that it was Christmas Day, so the next car was about two miles down the road so I had plenty of time to turn around and get going, instead of getting in a massive accident. It was a four lane road, but separated by some grass that dipped (you know what I'm talking about) and a barbed-wire fence.

Another time I was a moron and took some cues from cars barreling down a highway at 65mph and fish tailed in both directions before I managed to stop. The problem? This was back when there was the huge snowstorm in the eastern half of the U.S. about five years ago. Most people went maybe 30 on the highway, tops, but some people seemed fine booking it pretty fast, even if it was covered completely in snow. Then again, those type of drivers probably explain the miles and miles of wrecked cars on the side of the road. I forget what the average response for AAA was during that period, somewhere around 8-12 hours, maybe?

Just remember that NOT trying to save 5 minutes by flooring it might save your life, your car, and plenty of other headaches (such as killing someone or trashing their car, plus insurance hassles).
 

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