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How was your running experience from novice to now?

greatnoob

Senior member
Jan 6, 2014
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Just wondering as most of my friends are walkers and joggers o_O

How unfit were you when you started off, how did you feel, resting/running heart rate?

How are you now, how do you feel now, milage, pace, resting/running heart rate, tips for yourself when you first started etc.?
 
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RazorBladeMaster

Junior Member
Aug 30, 2020
3
2
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Couldn't run 200 metres at first, but after 3 weeks made 16km in one go. That in turn made my feet and knees hurt so badly i had to stop for another 2 weeks^^. In the mean time I started proper stretching, bought good shoes etc. I still got one contusion, but was able to run 12km yesterday. I have marathon to run in two weeks, will see if that is even possible :)
 

deadlyapp

Diamond Member
Apr 25, 2004
5,569
244
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I built up to the capability of running a half marathon in about 1:57 and never progressed any further than that. Fastest mile time is probably around 8 minutes and think my best 5k is around 24 minutes or so. My best running condition I ran three half marathons in a month.

At one point I probably couldn't run a mile in less than 14 minutes or so.

Now days I can probably cook out a mile in about 8:30-9:00 without a ton of trouble, but I run very very rarely anymore and only short distances.
 
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snoopy7548

Diamond Member
Jan 1, 2005
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Throughout high school and college I never ran. I tried cross country and track in middle school but I was pretty bad. In my mid-20s I started running and after less than a year I got my mile time down to ~6-6:30, while running my first and only 5k in 20:13. Never got any better than that. I probably started with a mile time around 9-10 min. Also started working out, so that helped a lot.

Now I'm in my mid-30s and my running is pretty sporadic, though I have been good about regularly working out (until this whole COVID stuff) - I almost have to force myself to run three days a week. My mile time is probably around 8 minutes, and I don't run more than 3.5 miles at a time.
 
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greatnoob

Senior member
Jan 6, 2014
968
395
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Couldn't run 200 metres at first, but after 3 weeks made 16km in one go. That in turn made my feet and knees hurt so badly i had to stop for another 2 weeks^^. In the mean time I started proper stretching, bought good shoes etc. I still got one contusion, but was able to run 12km yesterday. I have marathon to run in two weeks, will see if that is even possible :)
Very impressive. Agreed, I started taking stretching and warm ups seriously only a year ago and it helps prevent DOMS. Same goes for warm downs which, when running for long distances, are equally as important. Keep us updated and good luck!

I built up to the capability of running a half marathon in about 1:57 and never progressed any further than that. Fastest mile time is probably around 8 minutes and think my best 5k is around 24 minutes or so. My best running condition I ran three half marathons in a month.

At one point I probably couldn't run a mile in less than 14 minutes or so.

Now days I can probably cook out a mile in about 8:30-9:00 without a ton of trouble, but I run very very rarely anymore and only short distances.
Nice one on the 5k. I stopped running a while ago and I'm getting back into it. From my experience when I stopped running, there was a lead up time of a couple of weeks before I could do my usual mileage. My pace suffered a bit but I can see it improving. How did you find the half marathons on your body, post-run? I injured myself after my first one (let alone 3) because of bad form hahaa

Throughout high school and college I never ran. I tried cross country and track in middle school but I was pretty bad. In my mid-20s I started running and after less than a year I got my mile time down to ~6-6:30, while running my first and only 5k in 20:13. Never got any better than that. I probably started with a mile time around 9-10 min. Also started working out, so that helped a lot.

Now I'm in my mid-30s and my running is pretty sporadic, though I have been good about regularly working out (until this whole COVID stuff) - I almost have to force myself to run three days a week. My mile time is probably around 8 minutes, and I don't run more than 3.5 miles at a time.
Same here, I've kept my last few runs to ~3-4 miles because it's easier to recover from (also don't want to screw up my knees if I'm running with bad form for long distances). I'm going to slowly increase my mileage and pace over the coming weeks, not quite to your pace just yet but also don't want to rush into it and bust a joint. I'm finding it hard to find enough time to do strength training and running (alternating days) so I've paused leg days for running instead (technically still leg day right?)
 

snoopy7548

Diamond Member
Jan 1, 2005
5,582
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Same here, I've kept my last few runs to ~3-4 miles because it's easier to recover from (also don't want to screw up my knees if I'm running with bad form for long distances). I'm going to slowly increase my mileage and pace over the coming weeks, not quite to your pace just yet but also don't want to rush into it and bust a joint. I'm finding it hard to find enough time to do strength training and running (alternating days) so I've paused leg days for running instead (technically still leg day right?)
I also get knee pain occasionally. My left knee makes a popping noise when walking at times, but my doctor just told me to keep doing stretches. If I keep the runs relatively short I am able to run without any pain, but if I don't run for a while I tend to get pain after resuming, so I need to keep up with it.
 

mike8675309

Senior member
Jul 17, 2013
396
79
101
I started running at 45 and about 50lbs overweight. I started running using a couch to 5k program with Runnkeeper. I actually did a couple of those because I couldn't increase my running as fast as they were. I paid extensive attention to my stride, and my pace, looking for the forefoot to midfoot landing, more midfoot. (I run in zero drop shoes) During my first 2 years, I lost weight but dealt with a couple of injuries. I found if I was not very careful with my pace, I could pull my left calf. I did it once and repeated the injury by trying to get back too soon. It was a good 3 years before I was able to feel good about my stride and my pace. Shorter strides, with a faster pace, work well for me. Running 10-15 miles a month during the summer, plus a lot of work on the stair stepper in the winter, had me running an entire 5k by year 4 without any walking. COVID, George Floyd, and a family divorce impacting my grandkids has stopped me from having time or energy to run. But I'm still doing pretty good.
July 2016, just when I was starting to run my resting heart rate was 84 with a blood pressure of 125/82
My last visit was3 weeks ago, my resting heart rate is 53 and my blood pressure is 112/73
I'm 52 years old and on no medication. I was essentially sedentary until I was 46.

My suggestion for any new runner, particularly if they have not been a runner in the past is to start slow. You don't want an injury as it'll stop you completely. Do walk run to start. Even if you feel strong, don't push yourself for a good 6 months to give your body time to respond. Regular short runs will trigger your body to respond, strengthening bones to handle the new loads. Building up connective tissues like ligaments to adapt for the new loads you are putting on your body. Let your calves and other muscles get used to it. Do that for at least 6 months. Your muscle growth, your cardio improvements will out pace the bone and ligament adaptation, possibly leading to injury if you don't give things enough time to adapt. Have patience and take it easy.
 

Scarpozzi

Lifer
Jun 13, 2000
24,425
606
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It doesn't matter how fast you are. We all start where we start. Improvements can be made by mixing up the workouts. I got myself a Garmin watch and tried carrying as little as possible. My last Garmin has music (Forerunner 645 Music) and bluetooth, so I can basically run with my watch and headphones without a phone to track progress or provide entertainment. I can run without music too...I just like it for motivation when running hills around here.

I started distance running 5 years ago in June 2015, but haven't run much the past 2 years. From 2015-2019 I went from not running to running various distances weekly...around 30 miles per week. (but 60 miles one week) I was running enough that I gained weight when my legs were gaining muscle and I was eating tons of protein and I was constantly running or sleeping. I backed off and basically stopped being so crazy in 2018. It's just easier to do projects and more fun stuff than working out. I'm trying to find that happy place again.

If you want to start running, get on a running plan to train for a race. These days, most races are going virtual, but you can still set goals and be firm in achieving them. If I don't sign up for a race, I simply don't have a reason to train as hard. My problem now is that I ran 3 marathons and probably 15 half marathons and I'm not scared anymore....I know, even if I tried to run a marathon tomorrow, I could complete it....even though it would hurt, it would take me forever to complete it, etc... I wasn't so convinced when I started and that fear gave me purpose in my training.
 

pauldun170

Diamond Member
Sep 26, 2011
6,868
1,983
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I went from casual 1 milers in my area back in 2010 to running with friends on the street for 2-3 miles to my first 5k in 2012
First race was in 25min with my fastest race @22 flat in 2013.
I haven't run half marathon but in 2013 I ran 13.1 in 1:56.
2013 was and interesting year as I "changed shape" and dropped down to 175lbs.
2014 was my fastest year where I hit the mile 6.30.
In 2015 with an extra 20lbs over 2013 on me I ran 13.m in 1:58
Past 3 years have been hit or miss as I have been cycling way more and my schedule has been dominated by other obligations.
Nowadays @ 200lbs, its sporadic 2 milers with the occasional 5 miler. Biggest obstacle is way to many late nights and waking up too late to squeeze in a run combined with more motivation to break out the bike than to toss on my asics. Would run more if I had people to run with on a schedule that worked for me.

Races are awesome and a great overall experience.
Highly recommend signing up and then sticking around for post race stuff with friends. It's a great overall vibe
 
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