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Question How to stop exe downloads from being zipped

BaguetteBoing

Junior Member
Jan 9, 2021
1
0
6
So short story long my friend who lives a while away from he who was trying to switch to minecraft version 1.8.9 (for pvp). Anyways his java isn't updated so he had to install from the site, however he has a linux and of course it fucked up and everything downloaded couldnt be opened. After switching to chromium, we downloaded java but it installed as a .gz file because of course the pc has a million weird file zippers. Anyways it basically ruined the installer as there was no exe to be found within the decompressed bare files and Im assuming the exe would only execute properly if his pc didnt zip it up beforehand. I probably sound like a caveman here, sorry. I just told him on discord to delete all his file zipping software so we could not have to deal with it right now. I've looked everywhere but I really don't think anyone has cared enough to give a proper response.
 

damian101

Senior member
Aug 11, 2020
230
79
61
.tar.gz files are just archive files like .zip, not installation files like .deb (Debian/Ubuntu), .rpm (RHEL/Fedora/openSUSE/...) or .msi (Windows).
 

damian101

Senior member
Aug 11, 2020
230
79
61
I just downloaded the minecraft.tar.gz file myself. It contains a standalone, portable Minecraft installation. File "minecraft-launcher" is already marked as executable, so you just have to double-click it to start the launcher.
 

damian101

Senior member
Aug 11, 2020
230
79
61
You could also manually install the Minecraft Launcher by moving the extracted folder into /opt and run
ln -s /opt/minecraft-launcher/minecraft-launcher /usr/local/bin/minecraft-launcher
Now the Minecraft launcher can be started by the global command minecraft-launcher
Don't know how to add a launcher to the start menu, but that's also perfectly possible.

However, the best way to install packages is always through a package manager, so your installation can use shared dependencies and gets automatically updated. Debian, Ubuntu, Arch, Manjaro and all its derivatives are officially supported that way.
 

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