How to calculate natural gas cost for my new stove

NetWareHead

THAT guy
Aug 10, 2002
5,854
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Assuming that rating means 30,000 btus per hour, that is what your stove will consume per hour at full blast. Gas is usually billed to you in therms which is equal to 100,000 btus. Your gas bill will have the price per therm that you pay. There will also be a service fee and any applicable taxes etc...
 

TheSiege

Diamond Member
Jun 5, 2004
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Well thats not so bad if its .22 per hour. It heats my whole house on low. so its probably a lot less per hour
 

lxskllr

No Lifer
Nov 30, 2004
55,512
5,514
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Okay, what does 1000000 and 30000 represent?
I added the four rates, then divided by four. That'll give a rough average of all the pricing conditions that'll be encountered. Overkill though. Divide that by 1000000(the pdf's figures use 1000000 BTU blocks). That gives you a price per BTU. Multiply that by 30000. That's how many BTUs the stove uses per hour(probably?) according to the OP. 22¢

 

Eug

Lifer
Mar 11, 2000
23,250
729
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96% of the time, my gas stove is putting out exactly 0 BTUs.
Maybe 3% of the time, one my burners is putting out 15000 BTUs. That's when I'm boiling water for tea.

The other 1% of the time, it might be putting out anywhere from around 5000 BTUs up to the 90000 BTU range.

You have to factor that into the calculation.
 

CLite

Golden Member
Dec 6, 2005
1,726
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Well thats not so bad if its .22 per hour. It heats my whole house on low. so its probably a lot less per hour
You can get CO poisoning without proper ventilation, such ventilation would effectively cancel the benefits of heat produced by your stove top.

Please do not use your stove top to heat your house.
 

TheSiege

Diamond Member
Jun 5, 2004
3,918
14
81
96% of the time, my gas stove is putting out exactly 0 BTUs.
Maybe 3% of the time, one my burners is putting out 15000 BTUs. That's when I'm boiling water for tea.

The other 1% of the time, it might be putting out anywhere from around 5000 BTUs up to the 90000 BTU range.

You have to factor that into the calculation.
I am just trying to see what my max would be if I had my stove running all winter long
 

Eug

Lifer
Mar 11, 2000
23,250
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I am just trying to see what my max would be if I had my stove running all winter long
That would be an effective way to kill yourself. Well, not as effective as a gun to your head, but still a possibility.

Gas stove is a synonym for a free standing gas fireplace
http://www.napoleonfireplaces.com/products/gvf60-vent-free-gas-stove/
Vent-free fireplaces are designed to heat homes. Stoves aren't. Still, most still recommend against using vent-free fireplaces, and in fact they're illegal in Canada.

Also AFAIK they often don't recommend using vent-free fireplaces for extended periods, and sometimes even recommend opening a window during operation, which kinda defeats the purpose.
 
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Eug

Lifer
Mar 11, 2000
23,250
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How would that kill me?
Carbon monoxide poisoning, which BTW, can also occur with vent-free fireplaces, which is why the latter are illegal in most of Canada.

The CO poisoning occurs most often with older and defective products, but can occur with brand new products as well. And while vent-free fireplaces are designed to be used as heating sources, stoves for cooking are not built to be used this way.

I would never ever install a vent-free fireplace in my home, and I wouldn't use a gas stove to heat my home either. For the former it's moot anyway though, since they're illegal here.
 
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TheSiege

Diamond Member
Jun 5, 2004
3,918
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All my rooms have combination carbon monoxide and smoke detectors. Besides most of that stuff is just scare tactics. My house is so old and drafty that it's really not an issue. When was the last time you heard of someone dying from a natural gas stove creating carbon monoxide poisoning?
 

Eug

Lifer
Mar 11, 2000
23,250
729
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My grandpa has a wood burning stove on the farm....
Is it vented? Lots of wood burning stoves used for heat are vented.

Also, many buildings with wood burning stoves are old and drafty. eg. Log cabin or century home. They are effectively always "ventilated" because they aren't sealed very well.

All my rooms have combination carbon monoxide and smoke detectors. Besides most of that stuff is just scare tactics.
No it's not.

My house is so old and drafty that it's really not an issue.
That will help, but the best solution is not to do it in the first place. It's just fscking stupid.

When was the last time you heard of someone dying from a natural gas stove creating carbon monoxide poisoning?
Well, several people died or almost died during the ice storm last month from CO poisoning, although that was mainly from running BBQs and generators. Interestingly, for the latter, the generator wasn't even in the home, but still killed them.
 
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