How much does it cost to install a stove?

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by AStar617, Nov 1, 2006.

  1. AStar617

    AStar617 Diamond Member

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    I have a crappy basically non-functioning gas stove. I bought a brand new gas stove w/electric ignition (standard plug) and need it installed.

    I had a friend casually look at it and say it might make sense to install a newer gas shutoff valve at the same time because the old one doesn't have a hand-turnable knob and requires pliers (this is an old install easily from the 50s/early 60s), but that this could be simply installed further up the gas pipe and the old shutoff ignored..

    How much should I expect to spend on such an installation (stove hookup plus additional shutoff valve)?

    Thx
     
  2. akshatp

    akshatp Diamond Member

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    OMG when I first read this topic I thought it said "How much does it cost to install a slave?"

    LOL

    Anyway, I would say maybe two hours labor AT THE MOST since the gas line is already there. Can probably be done in an hour, but the plumber is likely to take his time and milk an extra hour.
     
  3. Kreon

    Kreon Golden Member

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    for the shutoff valve?
    no idea

    For the stove to be installed
    My aunt had hers installed for a couple hundred dollars. Personally, I think my brother and I coulda done it, but whatever.
     
  4. AStar617

    AStar617 Diamond Member

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    Yea I just dont like to play with gas if I can avoid it. Not sure Liberty Mutual would look too kindly on paying me after I firebomb my own home. :laugh:
     
  5. akshatp

    akshatp Diamond Member

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    If you didn't leave a gas pipe leaking on purpose, then why wouldn't they?

    We moved into a new home last November, and the plumber that installed the stove used an incorrect valve which was leaking into the laundry room. Luckily we smelled it and caught it in time, but hey, sh|t happens.

    Plus, your local Gas company will come and check out the connections for free to ensure there are no leaks.
     
  6. JulesMaximus

    JulesMaximus No Lifer

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    Why? It's not rocket science. In fact, it's quite easy to install gas appliances. If you've got a leak you'll smell it.

    <--Installed a gas dryer just last week. Took all of 45 minutes and that included unpacking the new dryer and cleaning the floor where the old dryer was.
     
  7. AStar617

    AStar617 Diamond Member

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    Correct me if I'm wrong, but don't you have to be a licensed plumber to work w/gas legally? And I honestly cant imagine NSTAR coming out to check on work they didn't do for free... that would be great if they did tho, but nobody would call them in the 1st place for installs!
     
  8. akshatp

    akshatp Diamond Member

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    Correcting you, you are wrong....

    No it is not illegal. You dont have to be a licensed plumber to work on your own home.

    PSE&G in NJ will check installations for free. They are a public utility company. They dont want sh|t blowing up. Im sure yours will check it too,..
     
  9. AStar617

    AStar617 Diamond Member

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    <--changed the thermocouple on a furnace last year, so it's not that I'm incapable/not handy. However, since the thermocouple is part of the shutoff mechanism, the worst that would happen if I installed wrong would be the furnace just wouldnt stay lit. This is a bit different, and I'd rather a pro handle it, even if for no other reason than to have someone else to point the finger at. CYA... :)
     
  10. AStar617

    AStar617 Diamond Member

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    Good, that's reassuring that a large utility would actually have a sensible policy on something like this. :thumbsup: I still have no intention of doing this on my own, if for no other reason (hehe 2nd use of that phrase, i *mean* it now) than the time, which i have none of these days.
     
  11. akshatp

    akshatp Diamond Member

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    I can understand not having the time to do it. But then dont blame it on mader up excuses like it is illegal to touch gas LOL
     
  12. UsandThem

    UsandThem Diamond Member

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    To do it yourself it would cost under $20.00. However, hiring someone to do it will cost you at least $200.00 (service charge and trip charges)....depends on how long they milk it.

    All you need it a new shutoff valve ($5.00), gas paste and leak test liquid ($5.00) and a few pieces of black pipe and a few fittings.

    All you have to do is shut of the gas, cut the pipe, install the new and you are done. It is actually a very easy project.

     
  13. Twista

    Twista Diamond Member

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    ELECTRIC FTW!
    ours is electric.. unplug and plug in.
    Unless the new one has a different prong plug. Had to find one that fits the new dryer before which made the install take alot longer.
     
  14. JulesMaximus

    JulesMaximus No Lifer

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    Fair enough. I don't think I'd tackle the valve replacement either...depends on the fitting and what was involved in replacing it. I've replaced many water valves though, they are easy.

    Can you call someone in to replace the valve and after that's done install the stove yourself? That's probably what I'd do.
     
  15. AStar617

    AStar617 Diamond Member

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    Was it really that funny for someone to think a license is required to work on something that's potentially dangerous? :confused: Didn't seem so farfetched to me but oh well, now I know.
     
  16. Pepsi90919

    Pepsi90919 Banned

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  17. BurnItDwn

    BurnItDwn Lifer

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    I am anyone but "Mr handyman" but even I have installed a gas stove before. It was a bit of a PITA, because the new stove needed a bigger diameter hose connector, and the Ace Hardware near bye didn't have the part I needed, but Home Depot did. After the home Once I had all the parts I needed, the install went nice and quick.

    Make absolutely sure all your joints are properly sealed up with sealant, make sure all the joints are nice and tight, and you should be OK.

    When you turn the gas valve back on, make sure you don't smell ANY gas. Make sure you light ALL pilot lights if there are any, Give it an hour or two after the install, and smell around the stove area, if no gas smell, you're good.



    The shutoff valve .. I don't know, I can't speak from experience when it comes to this.
     
  18. Kelemvor

    Kelemvor Lifer

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    Isn't it just
    1) Turn off Gas
    2) disconnect old stove and remove
    3) Put new stove in place and connect gas line and electric line (assuming everything is the same size)
    4) Turn gas back on

    Not sure what they'd be installing. It's not like they get bolted into place or have tricky placements or anything. The just sit ther eon the ground and connect up to the lines.

    But as for the shutoff valve, that you would probably have to pay someone for but not much. Shouldn't take more than an hour to pop a new valve on there.
     
  19. sswingle

    sswingle Diamond Member

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    It used te be that everyone did their own shuff like this and thought nothing of it. Now everyone wants someone else to do it for them.
     
  20. jadinolf

    jadinolf Lifer

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    If you decide to pay someone to do such an easy job, you'll be embarrassed when he/she leaves.

    Your local hardware store will have the parts.

     
  21. Scarpozzi

    Scarpozzi Lifer

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    Natural gas is only like 3-4 p.s.i. coming out of the line. You can buy brass nipples to connect the pipes and cutoff valves. You'll probably have like $10 in hardware if you buy a valve and parts....could be $15~20 if you buy a new flex pipe to connect the stove.

    Now, you can do this yourself with a pipe wrench and a crescent wrench. Simply figure out what elbows you need to put the valve where its unobstructed and measure everything so you can get to it easily. The backs of stoves are kind of hollowed out so you can fit the line and still push the stove up against the wall flush.

    Between the pipes, you'll need to get some pipe dope and be sure that there is no space between the threads for gas to leak. They make a special yellow teflon tape for gas lines, but for such low pressure, the dope actually works better.

    -Scar