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How do I know if I have an Ethernet jack or a phone jack?

Crush127

Junior Member
Jun 10, 2017
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0
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Id like to just start off by saying I really don't know a lot about this stuff, I have only read up on it just for a few hours and I'm still really confused.

So, I am build a gaming pc (with the help of a friend) and I would love to have a wired connection to my router to reduce lag as much as possible. I read that there is a way to put in some sort of "powerline" that is like a wireless-wired connection..? I'm not sure...

I did, however, find this (what is behind it) in my room. Right next to my router (in a different room, of course) is this.

I have a feeling that these are not Ethernet jacks but I wanted to make sure.

It's not majorly important that these are Ethernet, as I think that if I use a wireless connection, i will still be ok, though I would like to know more about the "power line" thing. That still confuses me.

Any help would be greatly appreciated!
 
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mnewsham

Lifer
Oct 2, 2010
14,484
403
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That's RJ-11 not RJ-45.

Ethernet is RJ-45.

Powerline adapters use the electrical wiring in your house to create a local network over copper, however older construction, and cheap new construction can have problems with Powerline adapters and adequate speeds, I personally have seen over 300mbps over powerline so it can work in the right circumstances.
MoCA might also be an option for you if your rooms are wired for coaxial (like for cable TV).


It would help to know where your router is in relation to your desktop.
 

Crush127

Junior Member
Jun 10, 2017
5
0
6
That's RJ-11 not RJ-45.

Ethernet is RJ-45.

Powerline adapters use the electrical wiring in your house to create a local network over copper, however older construction, and cheap new construction can have problems with Powerline adapters and adequate speeds, I personally have seen over 300mbps over powerline so it can work in the right circumstances.
MoCA might also be an option for you if your rooms are wired for coaxial (like for cable TV).


It would help to know where your router is in relation to your desktop.

My desktop is on the other side of my house in relation to my router.

When you say MoCA, do you mean this?
 

mnewsham

Lifer
Oct 2, 2010
14,484
403
136
My desktop is on the other side of my house in relation to my router.

When you say MoCA, do you mean this?
Yes, if your router has a Coaxial connection nearby, and your desktop ALSO has a coax connection nearby and they're connected through the walls already, then you just need to purchase a pair of MoCA to Ethernet adapters.

MoCA 2.0 gives around 400mbps if you need faster than that, Bonded MoCA 2.0 adapters can provide upwards of 800mbps.

https://www.amazon.com/Actiontec-MoCA-Ethernet-Adapter-ECB6000K02/dp/B013J7L6BW


So your network chain would look like:
Router > Ethernet > MoCA adapter > Coaxial > through the walls of your house > another Coaxial connection > another MoCA adapter > Ethernet > desktop
 

Crush127

Junior Member
Jun 10, 2017
5
0
6
Yes, if your router has a Coaxial connection nearby, and your desktop ALSO has a coax connection nearby and they're connected through the walls already, then you just need to purchase a pair of MoCA to Ethernet adapters.

MoCA 2.0 gives around 400mbps if you need faster than that, Bonded MoCA 2.0 adapters can provide upwards of 800mbps.

https://www.amazon.com/Actiontec-MoCA-Ethernet-Adapter-ECB6000K02/dp/B013J7L6BW


So your network chain would look like:
Router > Ethernet > MoCA adapter > Coaxial > through the walls of your house > another Coaxial connection > another MoCA adapter > Ethernet > desktop
Ok, that makes sense. I have one right next to my desktop, but I don't think I have one near my router, I can double check though. I do have a coax cable coming straight out of my floor into my router where is says cable, so I'm guessing that's not what I'm looking for.

Assuming I don't have another MoAC in the room where my router is, is there another way to go wired (apart from running a cable throughout my entire house)?
 

mnewsham

Lifer
Oct 2, 2010
14,484
403
136
Ok, that makes sense. I have one right next to my desktop, but I don't think I have one near my router, I can double check though. I do have a coax cable coming straight out of my floor into my router where is says cable, so I'm guessing that's not what I'm looking for.

Assuming I don't have another MoAC in the room where my router is, is there another way to go wired (apart from running a cable throughout my entire house)?
Is your router already using MoCA?
Some routers already have MoCA bridges built in as some cable companies deliver video on demand services over the internet and use MoCA over coax to do this.

If your router already has a MoCA coax connection and can do a MoCA WAN, then you'd just need a single MoCA to ethernet adapter by your desktop.

Take a picture of the back of your router and I might be able to tell more.

Worst case you can buy a coax splitter and add a 2nd connection for MoCA.
 

Crush127

Junior Member
Jun 10, 2017
5
0
6
Is your router already using MoCA?
Some routers already have MoCA bridges built in as some cable companies deliver video on demand services over the internet and use MoCA over coax to do this.

If your router already has a MoCA coax connection and can do a MoCA WAN, then you'd just need a single MoCA to ethernet adapter by your desktop.

Take a picture of the back of your router and I might be able to tell more.

Worst case you can buy a coax splitter and add a 2nd connection for MoCA.
Here is the back of my router. It is an Arris TG862 if that helps. I am using xfinity, and they have on demand services if I am understanding that correctly.

How could I do MoCA WAN? Would I need to split the coax going into the router?
 

mnewsham

Lifer
Oct 2, 2010
14,484
403
136
Would I need to split the coax going into the router?
Alright, well you should be able to use MoCA for now anyway, however with Comcast eventually switching to DOCSIS 3.1 down the line you might have to stop using MoCA if they do this, or get some sort of filter.

Essentially DOCSIS 2.0 and 3.0 uses 54-1000 MHz on Coax generally, and MoCA uses 1000-1500Mhz or so, DOCSIS 3.1 however is much higher bandwidth, and as such encroaches upon the MoCA spectrum.

https://www.amazon.com/BAMF-2-Way-Splitter-Bi-Directional-5-2300MHz/dp/B0113JAN8K

Use that splitter between the coax in the wall and the router, then use a MoCA adapter (https://www.amazon.com/Actiontec-MoCA-Ethernet-Adapter-ECB6000K02/dp/B013J7L6BW) hooked up to one of your routers ethernet LAN ports, and then feed with Coax back into the splitter.

Then at the far end where your desktop is hook up another MoCA adapter and then Ethernet directly into your computer (or a switch if you have more than 1 device you want wired)


So it should look like
Existing coax connection > splitter > Coax > router > ethernet > MoCA adapter > Coax > splitter > through the walls of your house > Coax > MoCA adapter > Ethernet > Desktop


Or you can test your luck with Power line adapters, but again, they are known to not work well in certain construction, generally older or cheap construction.
 
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JackMDS

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Oct 25, 1999
29,193
292
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Powerline adapters use the electrical wiring in our houses to create a local Computer network over copper, however older construction, and cheap new construction can have problems with Powerline adapters and adequate speeds, I personally have seen over 300mbps over powerline so it can work in the right circumstances..
While this True, it is only partial part of the Story. A major factor in the Powerline being useless is the ""Gadgets"" that are using the Lines.

Whatever is connected to the Power in and around the house is generating constant Electrical Noise and Spikes that have to be attenuating by the Powerline filters and thus affects the Signal to Noise ratio of the Ethernet Signal. As a result even with new clean lines you do not get good network performance unless you disconnect every electrical "Gadget" in the house Off the Grid.

As for the OP. Computer science is No Alchemy, there is No miracle solutions unknown to the Ignorant.

If Ethernet cables are not used the solution is an Expensive multiple APs/Mesh Wireless system.


:cool:
 

mnewsham

Lifer
Oct 2, 2010
14,484
403
136
While this True, it is only partial part of the Story. A major factor in the Powerline being useless is the ""Gadgets"" that are using the Lines.

Whatever is connected to the Power in and around the house is generating constant Electrical Noise and Spikes that have to be attenuating by the Powerline filters and thus affects the Signal to Noise ratio of the Ethernet Signal. As a result even with new clean lines you do not get good network performance unless you disconnect every electrical "Gadget" in the house Off the Grid.

As for the OP. Computer science is No Alchemy, there is No miracle solutions unknown to the Ignorant.

If Ethernet cables are not used the solution is an Expensive multiple APs/Mesh Wireless system.


:cool:
I've simply found this isn't always the case.

Like I said, i've had real world sustained use of over 300mbps in a residential setting and with 24/7 use for over 6 months.

I still wont recommend power line adapters unless it's the last possible solution because they're far more likely to have issues like you mentioned, but that doesn't mean there are ALWAYS issues in EVERY instance.

If they didn't work for some people, they wouldnt be sold. And they DO work, depending on deployment.
 

Crush127

Junior Member
Jun 10, 2017
5
0
6
I think I am going to try to go wireless first, but if that doesn't work ill try this out.

Thank you for the help though!
 

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