How can I login to my home desktop from another country (away on business) to play an online game that is not downloaded on my laptop?

TheSeanster

Junior Member
Jan 28, 2019
5
0
6
#1
I would like to be able to play heavy gpu, cpu and bandwidth intense games through my laptop online through wifi without latency. My laptop does not hold any requirements needed for the game so it is essentially a screen with low ram and connectivity to wifi, nothing more. Basically a dead computer needed for work.

I don't care how ridiculous the responses are, but is there a way this could happen, so I could play Battlefield 5 online or Rome Total War 2?

Much appreciated to the community here. I have tried reading up on how this could work but it's quite hard to read everything about networks and servers. I find myself even more confused. Not possible?
 
Aug 25, 2001
43,799
594
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#2
Steam Streaming, look it up.

Oh, just noticed the title. Nope, that's NOT going to work, sorry.
 

ElFenix

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Mar 20, 2000
98,153
428
126
#3
Steam Streaming, look it up.

Oh, just noticed the title. Nope, that's NOT going to work, sorry.
it's technically doable with a tunnel but i bet the latency is terribad.

edit: just noticed the link i had says it no longer works

edit2: parsec maybe.
 
Last edited:
Jun 3, 2011
10,067
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#4
The issue isn't the offloading of gpu work to the desktop, but the latency inherent to the distance. You could feasibly do it, say, from another location in the same city (provided both laptop and desktop have high bandwidth connections), but when you add a few thousand miles, the already-lagged gameplay that's occourring on the desktop is depending on your keyboard input from the laptop connection. Add to this that the desktop's upload and the laptop's download would be stressed trying to stream high-framerate video, and while it remains possible, a lag-free experience isn't realistic.
 

TheSeanster

Junior Member
Jan 28, 2019
5
0
6
#5
Thank you,

VirtualLarry
ElFenix
DigDog

for your responses.

Any ideas how much it would cost me to set up my own personal hub like this one?

Let's say I added another ISP to my home desktop and had an additional connector on my laptop from two different providers. Would I then be able to enjoy minimal latency or noticeable reduction in latency?

...

Mad respect for everyone here answering these silly questions.

Kind Regards
 
Aug 25, 2001
43,799
594
126
#6
Let's say I added another ISP to my home desktop and had an additional connector on my laptop from two different providers. Would I then be able to enjoy minimal latency or noticeable reduction in latency?
Adding / teaming connections, generally does not reduce latency.

Latency is basically more-or-less "RTT" - "round trip time".

If it takes you 30 minutes to travel to work, using the highway, does it make sense that you would be able to make it to work in 15 minutes, if you scheduled a separate cab and also drove?
 

paperfist

Diamond Member
Nov 30, 2000
6,157
78
106
www.the-teh.com
#8
I can't remember the names, but what about an actual streaming service that 'rents' games?
 

TheSeanster

Junior Member
Jan 28, 2019
5
0
6
#9
The issue isn't the offloading of gpu work to the desktop, but the latency inherent to the distance. You could feasibly do it, say, from another location in the same city (provided both laptop and desktop have high bandwidth connections), but when you add a few thousand miles, the already-lagged gameplay that's occourring on the desktop is depending on your keyboard input from the laptop connection. Add to this that the desktop's upload and the laptop's download would be stressed trying to stream high-framerate video, and while it remains possible, a lag-free experience isn't realistic.
So if this is the case. Since I have Fiber optics at home all I would need to do is make sure I am connecting to a wifi that is a fiber optic connection and I should be relatively fine? The physics aspect makes sense but would the fiber make any difference? You have helped a lot. Thank you.
 

TheSeanster

Junior Member
Jan 28, 2019
5
0
6
#10
Adding / teaming connections, generally does not reduce latency.

Latency is basically more-or-less "RTT" - "round trip time".

If it takes you 30 minutes to travel to work, using the highway, does it make sense that you would be able to make it to work in 15 minutes, if you scheduled a separate cab and also drove?
This makes so much sense. Thank you, Larry.
 

TheSeanster

Junior Member
Jan 28, 2019
5
0
6
#11
it's technically doable with a tunnel but i bet the latency is terribad.

edit: just noticed the link i had says it no longer works

edit2: parsec maybe.
Thank you, ElFenix. Let's say hypothetically if I set this all up with two fiber optic connections at either end 3k miles apart. What measures would you take to keep tight latency margins?
 

ElFenix

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Mar 20, 2000
98,153
428
126
#12
Thank you, ElFenix. Let's say hypothetically if I set this all up with two fiber optic connections at either end 3k miles apart. What measures would you take to keep tight latency margins?
seems like fiber should be all the measures you need, but i'm not a networking guy so i dunno. maybe boot off all the netflix users on the line.
 

sdifox

No Lifer
Sep 30, 2005
74,914
441
126
#13
You can use TeamViewer 12, but it will be laggy as hell.
 

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