How can I build a silent system where (PWM) fans stop spinning on low temps?

Watercooling or Aircooling

  • Watercooling

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nico023

Junior Member
Feb 26, 2017
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I recently stumbled on silentmaxx.de and the silent PCs they offer and thought about doing a budget DIY thing like they do.

When I get a big ass CPU Air cooler like the Alpenföhn Olymp does the fan really need to spin when I am just surfing the web? Maybe I need a even bigger cooler like they do I don't know. Here is a test of one of the passive coolers they sell, its says good passive cooling but bad active (seems strange to me). given that that test is from 2011 I would like to know how it compares to other modern solutions or even coolers that are not specifically marketed as passive coolers by given how big some of them are maybe its possible?

My Mainboard is a MSI z97 gaming 7. It is able to control PWM fans but the lowest setting is 12.5%. Are there board or solutions out there that actually stop the fans on low temps? I don't want some super feature rich fan control, I want just that, no modes, no buttons ... Also same for case fans. I want them to stop when I am not gaming or doing heavy stuff with my PC. I tried googling this but not really found anything. I don't actually have PWM case fans my 3 pins can be slowed to 50% only by my board but my guess it that PWM fans just work like the CPU fans when connected, meaning lowest setting is 12.5%

When I am gaming I don't care about nose its just when working or browsing the web I want a silent PC. Also it would be great if there is also a adapter for Ryzen for a CPU cooler already confirmed in case I build a new PC in a year or something.

Backstory (If you are interested)

I recently moved form a case that was open on one side to closed one. I was disappointed with the noise.

I have a 120m CPU water cooler from Asetek (Don't know the exact name, was a pre build PC) that was loud before and after moving it either got louder or my case the NZXT H630 has now opening on front, bottom (i think it actually reflects a lot of noise from the floor to my ears, maybe I can fix that a bit) on back and top on one side (away form where I sit) somehow bundles the noise and its did not make my system more silent at all. I also had a motherboard turned upside down and I don't know how if it matter then the pump exits are now at the top instead at the a bottom I, I hear water when I go near the pump, I am not sure if its normal or build up air and what I can do but I guess I am not getting this thing really silent. I wound never guess that I would consider switching form a water-cooler to air but looks like thats what I am doing.

I just watched a informative video and I for myself have decided I just like Air-cooling more for various reasons. Sure there are better coolers then my shitty just one 120 radiator thing, but still.
 
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tential

Diamond Member
May 13, 2008
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My only PWM fan is my side fan. It turns off.
It has the FULL controllable range.
My CPU fans go to 13%.

Sounds like you just got led astray man.
If you want a silent build next year when you're building feel free to PM me or reach out to me.

For a "silent" build, you should go air. The noise of the pumps for water cooling will always add noise. Also, it depends on the size of the build. IF size isn't an issue, you can get far larger coolers/fans for your components that move slower and are quiet.

So I would personally go a full PWM build of fans. Because of the fact that the fans have full controllable range, you can have them only turn on when the CPU is at say 70 degrees or something. Then, I'd just get the largest cooler Noctua has. This is the Noctua DH-15. I can't hear this cooler. In a good case with good noise dampening and a GOOD CPU, you won't ever hear it.

I don't ever hear my setup unless I'm gaming and my GPU fans spin up.

Noctua DH-15 and Good quiet PWM fans that only spin up when absolutely necessary. That's all you need my friend.

I'd choose a good case too with good Airflow. Since you have a big case like that, I'd go with the Fractal Design R(whatever number it's on now). Great case.
Or you can go with the NZXT H440 if you want to stick with NZXT, but I prefer the Fractal Design case. I have the R4, but the R5 is out and is better.

If your build is still loud after that, I don't know what to tell you.

What's your full build?
 
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nico023

Junior Member
Feb 26, 2017
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I don't want to silent build next year, but if I not spend 60€++ on a CPU cooler I want keep it when I potentially build a complete new system. OK I already have decided to go foll PWM fans and I also have decided to go Air so thanks but I don't need you to reconfirm that this is best for me. I just want to make my PWM fans actually STOP. I also mentioned the Alpenföhn Olymp and I think thats better then the DH-15 and also cheaper so why would I not take that. Also this does not answer the question if I can use them without any fan spinning at all!

I just saw a Linux Tech Tipps video when he talks about "Inline low noise adapters". What is that? I searched and found some fan connector splitters that just use one PWM signal to control multiple fans, OK I could use that and let my CPU pin control my entire case, great. But thats not it I guess. Just read this things just lower voltage so and thats actually bad for PWM fans as they should run full voltage and be controlled only by PWM. And if they just reduce the overall speed of the PWM then I lose max speed for when I may need it? Also not ideal.

Yeah OK you don't know what to tell me, then tell me nothing, you told me a story, did not answer a single of my questions and just tell me to buy shit you bought ... not really helping. And by shit I don't mean shit. I know the Fractal cases are great, I actually considered the Thermaltake Suppressor F51, its basically a improved R5, all the kids screem "stolen" on the net. I think its ridiculous because everything on this world is "stolen" by that logic. Anyway I mentioned budget did I, I got a NZXT H630 used form ebay and my PC is already moved in it as I also already mentioned, so recommending cases is a bit out of line here. Lol I just realized that case goes for 150$ I got it for 55€.

And my full build does not matter, well maybe my CPU matters in case of semi-idle passive cooling. Its the i7-4790k and its not overclocked but I would like to be able to do that in the future with a new setup but if its to hard to do then I would just go for absolute silence when not under load.
 
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UsandThem

Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 4, 2000
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Yeah OK you don't know what to tell me, then tell me nothing, you told me a story, did not answer a single of my questions and just tell me to buy sh*t you bought ... not really helping.
Welcome to Anandtech forums!
 
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Crono

Lifer
Aug 8, 2001
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I'm not a cooling expert by any means, but here's some tips to get you started until the experts arrive. :p Take with a teaspoon of salt as I'm still in the process of upping my cooling game.

I'd decide on the case first. One with support for multiple large fans (the larger the better - min I would look at is 140mm support going up to 200mm or higher, though there are plenty of "quiet enough" 120mm fans as it's a common size), and a lot of interior room, especially if you have an open-air (as opposed to blower) cooled GPU. You want a motherboard with a lot of PWM fan headers, which you'll be using fan curves in the UEFI/BIOS to control. You can forgo using too many PWM headers, though, by using low noise adapters/lower voltage some fans or using splitters on like fans (e.g. if you have two identical top exhaust fans you can run them off the same header using a splitter) that come with them (Noctua includes LNA/ULNA cables with most if not all of their case fans).

You'll want fans that will have high static pressure where it's needed (on CPU heatsink, on filter covered mounts especially) and the highest real/tested airflow (CFM) at the lowest possible RPM. Several review sites and youtube channels post results of testing fans. Some manufacturers (be quiet! and Noctua come to mind... be quiet! also makes cases that use their fans, and they make PSUs, as well) are known for quiet fans, and most of the other fan manufacturers have specific fans or lines of fans designed to be very quiet (low RPM, higher quality bearings that reduce noise, frames that minimize vibration, etc),

You can get to virtual silence with large fans that move a lot of air at low RPM. I wouldn't really look or expect to have my case fans be not spinning at all, and at or under ~1k RPM many fans are inaudible at normal seating distances, anyway. Many PSUs and GPUs have automatic zero-RPM fans when they are running cool enough, so you don't need to necessarily worry about those components - which are often louder than case fans because they tend to use smaller fans - if your whole system cooling is effective.

You can also look at using acoustic foam to dampen the sound. Also just the sound of air moving can make noise even if the fans themselves are inaudible, so if you want an ultra quiet computer I'd focus on cases that are designed to be "silent". Thermaltake, Phanteks, Fractal Design, NZXT, Corsair, Cooler Master, and be quiet! all have models that cater to fans of silence, and many of them happen to be good value and feature-rich, as well.

Obviously it also helps to have the most thermally efficient components in your build if possible, and you can also help matters by undervolting and/or downclocking your GPU and CPU if it's feasible for you to do so and maintain performance. The less burden on your cooling, the slower and quieter you can run your fans.

The only way to have true zero RPM throughout your entire build is to have fanless passive cooling, which is actually very hard and/or expensive to do on a performance/gaming build, but is entirely feasible for SFFs with integrated graphics. Otherwise having passive cooling for CPU is pointless as the HSF is not usually the loudest component in a system, anyway, and you'll need other fans running to keep air flowing for the rest of the system.
 
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nico023

Junior Member
Feb 26, 2017
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"I'd decide on the case first. One with support for multiple large fans ..."
So you are the 2nd person who either did not read my post or just decided to just ignore what I wrote. I got a new case its the NZXT H630. And I don't want some general advice of things I already know. And centainly not again some advice on cases. I have a 200mm fan in the front and moved it up to the mid floor at the front, put the 140mm at the bottom of the case. But that all irrelevant because I want those fans to stop spinning when there is no need. But I have the say I am disappointed with this case. The font has only a super small area for air intake and you hear the air going trough there. Its really crappy designed, I am thinking of cutting the bottom of the front door. And they made the opening on the side where I sit where the USB connectors are the opening on the top is on the other side, they really had a brain farts while designing this case. Also I think I am definitely "sold" on the idea that sound dampening is useless. This case is praised for its thick dampening material. Its doing nothing! I read a test from a skeptic where he showed that you gain virtually nothing from it, its just great for marketing.

I looked up this adapters, they lower voltage that seems to be OK for some PWM fans it seems but I guess still you cant stop them with it, or actually stopping then with it And again even if you could that looses the maximum RPM for potential over-clocking I will do later. So I want some kind if fan control that detects the 12.5% PWM signal from the mainboard and actually powers of the fans, as soon as its gets higher just act like its usually does, this way I could just use a splitter to control my 2 case fans based on CPU temp.

I also tested the PWM fan on the case fan connector now and nothing changes I can only go as low as 50% and not 12.5% as I expected because that how my CPU headers work. I save seen a video or screenshot of a similar BIOS (probably never board) where they could switch between PWM and voltage control for the case fans, I cant. I have 4 pins but I am not sure WTF the mainboard is doing then there is a PWM connected there, still only control via voltage it seems. And was one of the top praised boards at the time, crap!

I have that, I have said I can regulate the CPU fan to as low as 12.5% but thats it. Maybe I am over-thinking it as I don't have a graphics card that shuts down its fan when not on load, but there are ones like ASUS STRIX or so that actually do that. My PSU is also not fanless, but that exists as well. That all comes maybe later with my next system. So right now I have my head set on a fan that stops. Maybe I just buy the a Alpenföhn Olymp and drop the idea of a not spinning CPU fan because that one seems to almost silent so I don't know if my spinning hard-disks are actually not louder. But I could move them into a DIY NAS below the bad or something. Then I would still need a automated solution for case fans to really shut down.

"You want a motherboard with a lot of PWM fan headers, which you'll be using fan curves in the UEFI/BIOS to control."​

I don't think I am up for buying a new Mainboard just for the fan control, well OK if I know it can actually really shut down case fans at temps I set I would consider finding a used one on ebay. But my board is pretty good so looking

I have a fan that has its own temperature controller, what would be great is fans like that that power themselves only on when it gets really warm. I think the its just that its bad for the motors not to spin when there is power coming through, It needs a more complex controller to actually disconnects the power, probably to complex to build into fans, but maybe I am wrong. That would actually a great product, you could put the temperature sensor between the fins on the CPU heat-sink, and at 45degree Celsius or something like that they can power on on their own.
 

nico023

Junior Member
Feb 26, 2017
7
0
1
https://linustechtips.com/main/topic/137055-need-a-fan-controller-to-turn-fans-all-the-way-off/ Here is says that in 2014 there were already asus boards with some software to control fans in I way I like. But no specifics, also something about something custom to achieve this, again no specifics.

So my question would be with this asus software, is this software only, must it always run or can it save this setting to bios?

https://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread.php?45081-Fan-Expert-2-Fan-Control-Tips-(Turning-fans-off-Make-it-work-with-Arctic-Freezer)

people hacking their way into things that are probably disabled for a reason ... I am really surprised this is not commonly solved problem with a fast to find easy solution.
 
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Crono

Lifer
Aug 8, 2001
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You never said in your original post that you weren't considering a new case, just that you recently moved into one (and nevermind that it's in the "if you are interested" section). You've made it clear you aren't satisifed with your current case, and you also hinted that you may consider a future build, so I don't know why you need to emphasize that now as if we are blind, just make it clear in your original post that you have ruled out a new case.

Keep in mind that the advice we give that you may already know isn't just for you, as you are not the only person who will read replies. This is your thread, but it's not your thread alone.

Also, you do know a lot already and likely more than me, but you are also asking for something without explaining the basic problem fully: what exactly bothers you in your current system in regards to noise? 12.5% vs 0% is just a number difference on the screen. Are your case fans too loud at minimum? Which fans have you tried? You state you don't want to replace your motherboard or case, so the obvious solution is to get fans that are inaudible at minimum speed, which is entirely possible, but senseless if you have spinning drives (a far worse offender, in my opinion) or other potential sources of noise like low level coil whine or liquid cooling components (and as already stated, full air is the way to go for quiet).

I think the PWM on my MSI board may allow for zero rpm, but I have to check. My own preference is to keep all fans running even at idle, though at a low speed to keep air flowing out of the case to lower the ambient internal temp (better for all components, especially if temp monitoring has failed).

EDIT: just checked, the fan control does allow for a "0%" setting, but that just takes it down to the minimum RPM (~400 RPM, be quiet! Pure Rock) which is inaudible to me (the other fans in my system bottom out at higher than that, and aren't noisy but they are audible).

I don't think a full shutoff is common or it may not exist on current boards because it's an impractical, unnecessary solution for 99.999% of people.
 
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Ancalagon44

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Feb 17, 2010
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To be honest, I know this is not what you want to hear, but it sounds like your only option might be replacing your case.

For an explanation, read the review of the Corsair 330R Blackout edition case on Anandtech. This case happens to have sound deadening panels that absorb sound and so reduce noise. The problem is, they also reduce cooling performance. The result is that, if you have a build that has relatively little fans to start with (thus basically a low power build), then with this case, it would be silent. However, if your build has a lot of fans to start with (high power CPU and GPU), then this case will make it more noisy because the fans have to spin faster to provide proper cooling performance.

I suspect this is where you are with your case - its poor airflow is making your fans spin faster to try to keep your components cool, and it won't matter what you set your PWM fans to - 0% or 12.5% - they HAVE to spin up to keep your components cool. It sounds like 12.5% is what you have set as the minimum value for your fans - the problem is that they will spin up above this minimum as needed by the temperature, which sounds like what is happening. So it would not matter if you had set 0% as the minimum - they won't spin at that minimum, as that would mean allowing your components to overheat.

Play a game for 15 minutes and then note down what your CPU, MB and GPU temperatures are.
 
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UsandThem

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So you are the 2nd person who either did not read my post or just decided to just ignore what I wrote. I got a new case its the NZXT H630. And I don't want some general advice of things I already know. And centainly not again some advice on cases.
Just a small piece of advice. You have just signed up here, and this is the second long-term user you have been extremely rude to who took the time to try and help you.

Your first post is long and unclear, so it's perfectly understandable why there is some confusion. In it, you talk about many things you are unhappy with. When you lash out at people and act rudely, many members here will simply ignore your posts and will not offer help. The people here who take time and offer help do it on their own personal time, and do it for free.

"You catch more flies with honey rather than vinegar".
 

Rifter

Lifer
Oct 9, 1999
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not going to waste my time with this, want the 5 min of my life it took me to read op back. should start reading replies first would save time.
 

nico023

Junior Member
Feb 26, 2017
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Just a small piece of advice. You have just signed up here, and this is the second long-term user you have been extremely rude to who took the time to try and help you.

Your first post is long and unclear, so it's perfectly understandable why there is some confusion. In it, you talk about many things you are unhappy with. When you lash out at people and act rudely, many members here will simply ignore your posts and will not offer help. The people here who take time and offer help do it on their own personal time, and do it for free.

"You catch more flies with honey rather than vinegar".
So telling people that their answers are not helping, noticing them that they did not read my post, that they did not answer my main question that is in the title and talk about other stuff ONLY. I gave it a bit of context because I thought it may interest people or help.

I am tempted to give details answers to yet again answers that just annoy me and did not help. Seriously I say that I don't care about noise when under load, that I think dampening is a myth, that I am aiming for shutting fans down on low temps and this guy seriously after I told 2 guys I don't want to talk about cases that my only solution is to change my new case. If nothing is spinning in it it does not fucking matter its a case that open on all sides.

Also you talk about that some "long term user" is some kind of holy creature not to be critical off. As I am a low life scum with no rights because I just registered. If you are a long time user ans be that fucking clueless that not my fault.

What is my fault is trying a forum, its typical and I should have guessed this. Its always the same talkative people giving really low quality answers and yet I should just stuck with the question in the title, got to talketive myself but would never do that as a answer if I am unable to actually help. Is there a stackoverflow site for hardware? Superuser? Is is that just software? Maybe I recreate a thread and stick with my basics.

also I think the 99.999999% claim is totally false. Those ASUS STRIX Cards, Fanless PSUs and Fanless CPU coolers do sell for a reason. Its not that I am one in 1 million who has this thought. I bet it could be a great selling point for a mainboard or a fan controller to offer the option of actually show off fans. And I am 100% sure there is a solution, it may be something that advanced as to have a alduino or something custom to control fans i your case but I will find it. Probably not in this thread.

Profanity is not allowed in the technical forums
Markfw
Anandtech Moderator
 
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UsandThem

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May 4, 2000
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I think dampening is a myth, that I am aiming for shutting fans down on low temps and this guy seriously after I told If nothing is spinning in it it does not f**king matter its a case that open on all sides.

Also you talk about that some "long term user" is some kind of holy creature not to be critical off. As I am a low life scum with no rights because I just registered. If you are a long time user ans be that f**king clueless that not my fault.
I initially came in to offer advice, but after seeing how you responded to the first person, I just highlighted a segment of your first attack, and welcomed you. After that, you continued on.

I have a sneaking suspicion you won't be staying around here long. My advice for your next stop: Dial back the language and attitude some, and you might just find your answer. There is more to cooling than turning off a PWM fan, but you were too worked up to listen.

Good luck!
 
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Crono

Lifer
Aug 8, 2001
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So telling people that their answers are not helping, noticing them that they did not read my post, that they did not answer my main question that is in the title and talk about other stuff ONLY. I gave it a bit of context because I thought it may interest people or help.

I am tempted to give details answers to yet again answers that just annoy me and did not help. Seriously I say that I don't care about noise when under load, that I think dampening is a myth, that I am aiming for shutting fans down on low temps and this guy seriously after I told 2 guys I don't want to talk about cases that my only solution is to change my new case. If nothing is spinning in it it does not fucking matter its a case that open on all sides.

Also you talk about that some "long term user" is some kind of holy creature not to be critical off. As I am a low life scum with no rights because I just registered. If you are a long time user ans be that fucking clueless that not my fault.

What is my fault is trying a forum, its typical and I should have guessed this. Its always the same talkative people giving really low quality answers and yet I should just stuck with the question in the title, got to talketive myself but would never do that as a answer if I am unable to actually help. Is there a stackoverflow site for hardware? Superuser? Is is that just software? Maybe I recreate a thread and stick with my basics.

also I think the 99.999999% claim is totally false. Those ASUS STRIX Cards, Fanless PSUs and Fanless CPU coolers do sell for a reason. Its not that I am one in 1 million who has this thought. I bet it could be a great selling point for a mainboard or a fan controller to offer the option of actually show off fans. And I am 100% sure there is a solution, it may be something that advanced as to have a alduino or something custom to control fans i your case but I will find it. Probably not in this thread.
Those zero RPM components assume system cooling by case fans. There's a reason there aren't cases sold with automatic zero RPM fans, it's because it doesn't make any sense. Not in a performance or even light gaming system, anyway; you can get away with passive cooling with mobile/SFF parts (or by having an open-air setup, or if your computer is outdoors in Antarctica), but not relatively power hungry desktop parts in a conventional* case. Even idling they contribute to system heat that needs to be dissipated outside the case. Zero RPM case fans would be spinning up and down all the time... maybe there's a market for that, but I haven't heard anyone else demand it.

As far as dampening goes: did you try acoustic foam pads yourself in another case, or are you making judgement based solely on that case? I haven't used foam myself - I value the balance of performance, aesthetics, and low noise, so I haven't found the desire to when it acts like an insulator - but supposedly it does help, if not completely silence an already low-noise system.

You still haven't elaborated on the issue of noise (are your fans at minimum speed indeed producing a specific sound that's bothering you, or whether it's an OCD thing that you just don't want them to spin when the CPU is idle), or what fans you've used/are using. If you want help, you need to help us, not just demand we solve your problem the way you want us to.

Feel free to seek help elsewhere. If you are confident that we are the problem, I'd love a link to wherever you post this next (it would even be great if you link back to this thread - see what they think).

Good luck to you.

* There are cases that act like heatsinks, but most aren't designed to be used with standard ATX consumer hardware in mind
 
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tential

Diamond Member
May 13, 2008
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Wow... I didn't realize trying to help would result in a viciously long attack on me multiple times from the op.

Even worse since the op edited his after I posted. There is no way for anyone to know what info was there except mods who hey if I missed something did I deserve that?

I'm definitely not a clueless user on this subject as my build is silent, and it wasn't hard to achieve hence why I wanted to help the op.

Getting to the topic op hated on my cpu cooler choice stating he already had a good cooler.



The cooler he hasn't isn't as good as the dh15 hence why I showed other coolers would reduce noise. The case I get it it's brand new. But in the op he states its hampering his airflow. Why would you not be open to changing that? I can't change his Intel cpu as that makes no sense. And I can't understand how any of his other components can effect noise because when I ask I'm rudely attacked.

I mean, my PC had 7 hdds in it at one point, multiple gpus, a cpu etc. Still was silent.
When it didn't have all of that and was barebones, again still silent. I just changed things around based on my needs.

But I mean, he doesn't want to change any components, he will get the pwm fans after I explained that at least, not sure what other solutions he was looking for?

Anyone able to chime in and help me understand so I can help users on here better?
Thanks.



Sorry if this post sounds flustered it's rare to be treated with this much rudeness on these sections of this forum.
 
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BonzaiDuck

Lifer
Jun 30, 2004
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Well, the OP can lambast me -- I don't mind. But for nico023 or anyone else, the question prompted me to go back into my BIOS to review and then test a feature he would want if he needs exclusive motherboard control of fans without adding any more third-party controller or front-panel devices.

The motherboard is a Sabertooth Z170 S. A lot of the same generation boards should have the same feature, and I would suspect even an MSI Z97 gaming board might have it, if I could be sure that MSI has implemented fan-control to compete with ASUS. I might have my doubts, but that's for someone else to discover.

In the ASUS Q-FAN control, I can control a pump, 2 CPU fan-ports, 6 Chassis fan ports, 3 Assistant Fan ports, and 2/3 "external" ports linked to additional thermal sensors of the two-pin kind that the user might add to the system.

I can set fan-control mode to DC or PWM for any of those ports. The Q-FAN section/menu allows definition of fan-curves, in addition to a minimum RPM setting for each as threshold for an alarm. There is an "Ignore" setting for that feature. Another menu item for each fan port allows the fan speed to drop to 0% if the chosen temperature source (CPU, VRM, etc. etc.) drops below the minimum set in the fan-curve.

I tested it, and my fans do indeed turn off completely and then spin up with temperature. The chosen fans were LED side-panel 140mm units, and the LEDs go dark as the fans spin down to 0 (but what would you expect?)

So thanks to nico023 for directing my attention and allowing me to test what I hadn't bothered with earlier.

I must however issue a rebuttal to the OP about "dampening" being a "myth." I think the actual threshold for human ears is around 30 dBA, but that's not important. Instead,, when Spire acoustic foam cut to size and applied close to the noise source, it will have a significant effect on motor and vibration noise. I use Nidec-Servo Gentle Typhoon AP-30 fans for my exhaust on two systems, capable of 4,200 RPMs. If "noiseless" is defined as 2,000 RPM, I can run them up to 3,200 RPM with no noise if the fan is ducted in a box with three or four layers of Spire around it.

Why do you think they use acoustic material on the walls of "sound-proof" rooms?

UPDATE AFTERTHOUGHT: The only problem with allowing case fans to spin down to 0 is that suddenly, there is less case-pressure and more passive exhaust. I suppose this wouldn't matter at idle speeds, anyway.

As for acoustic tests on coolers like the NH-D15, the Cryorig and others. Y'all choose to save money the way you wish. Usually, I'll replace a bundled fan, and use my various noise-deadening techniques. For instance, you want to isolate a fan from a cooler with rubber mounts. Bundled fans are sometimes noisy, cheap knockoffs. The Noctua bundled fans are often limp by my standards.

So I don't pay much attention to the acoustic test comparisons. I'm interested in thermal resistance comparisons, which translate into simpler performance comparisons in degrees-C. And as I said -- I don't buy cheap fans with sleeve bearings.
 
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tential

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May 13, 2008
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Maybe my z87 mobo from Asus doesn't have that. Thanks a lot bonzai.
I'm excited to go into my bios settings and to get a new mobo.
 

UsandThem

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I think what all posters in this thread have pointed out, for anybody who comes across this thread, is silent cooling is a very detailed "art".

The requirements can be altered by a variety of factors. Things like tempature, humidity, dust, components, and settings.

A lot of people on computer hardware forums like going for the performance crown, and if extra noise and heat is a part of that, so be it. I am the opposite. I gladly give up some performance to achieve quiet computing. If I sit at my desk with no background noise or not listening to music or playing a game, I do not want to hear my computer. How do I do this? Lots of case fans running at low RPMs, a video card that doesn't turn on its fans until it hits 60c, a PSU that doesn't turn it's fan on under light loads, and finally a case with sound deadening material.

If a person uses quality case fans that are designed with quietness in mind, at 500 RPM and below, or thereabouts, you should not be able to hear them at all. However, it is necessary to have the case fans work to remove heat. They don't have to work very much at all if just doing normal desktop stuff. If a person insists to have them all turn off, the heat becomes trapped in the case, raising the temperature, and eventually causing fans to speed up more than they needed to if you had just left them spinning to begin with.
 
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BonzaiDuck

Lifer
Jun 30, 2004
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As for the German BigBlock. I'd have to see it in a bench comparison with ten or twenty others. It has an interesting design, but I'd have to see the performance data. It weighs more than the LG Macho or NH-D15, but the weight spec may include the fan while the former coolers are about 920gm and 980gm respectively bare of fans.

I think what all posters in this thread have pointed out, for anybody who comes across this thread, is silent cooling is a very detailed "art".

The requirements can be altered by a variety of factors. Things like tempature, humidity, dust, components, and settings.

A lot of people on computer hardware forums like going for the performance crown, and if extra noise and heat is a part of that, so be it. I am the opposite. I gladly give up some performance to achieve quiet computing. If I sit at my desk with no background noise or listening to music, I do not want to hear my computer. How do I do this? Lots of case fans running at low RPMs, a video card that doesn't turn on its fans until it hits 60c, a PSU that doesn't turn it's fan on under light loads, and finally a case with sound deadening material.

If a person uses quality case fans that are designed with quietness in mind, at 500 RPM and below, or thereabouts, you should not be able to hear them at all. However, it is necessary to have the case fans work to remove heat. They don't have to work very much at all if just doing normal desktop stuff. If a person insists to have them all turn off, the heat becomes trapped in the case, raising temps, and eventually causing fans to speed up.
I was a real "hot-dawg" for the 200mm fans to fit a HAF case. That's OK, or it was. But you get tired of the old HAFs. I also defined my "optimization" ideal as a system with a minimum number of fans for maximum airflow and manageable noise. By "Manageable" I mean that you don't hear anything unless you're running affinitized LinX or Prime95 to push the temperatures as high as they can go.

So the most recent build is in my sig -- which uses an "old" Stacker 830 -- a model released around 2007 -- I think. With this, I truly violated my "minimum fans" constraint, so I have a total of 9: 5x 140mm (4 intake, 1 CPU-pusher); 1x CoolerMaster Crossflow barrel fan (exhaust); 1x Noctua iPPC 3000 (CPU-to-case exhaust); and 1x Noctua 40mm "VRM" fan. Forgot: the 9th fan comes with the mini-OC GTX 1070 graphics card.

It's insanely quiet in most usage scenarios. As far as I can see -- in all . . usage scenarios.

[PS again . . ] By the way. The ThermalRight LG Macho edges out the NH-D15 by about 1C degree. It falls short of an EKWB Predator 240 kit by about 5C. And of course, I beat the Predator by 7C with a CLU-relidded processor. Ya pick yur choices! It's all an optimization problem under various constraints!
 
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BonzaiDuck

Lifer
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Maybe my z87 mobo from Asus doesn't have that. Thanks a lot bonzai.
I'm excited to go into my bios settings and to get a new mobo.
It may, and it may not -- I wouldn't know. I DO know that my Z68 boards provided ample thermal fan control, even without that feature. [NOW ! I want to look at the Z68 BIOS again . . ]

I wouldn't buy a new motherboard just for this feature. My God! You can run most fans down to 300 to 400 RPM, and they won't be noisier than if simply not running. This idea of actually allowing them to spin down to 0% is fine, but fretting over not having it is . . . well . . . silly.

If you were building a new system and wanted these features just to use so many of them, that's when you'd choose the "right" board -- whatever that is. For me and the $180 I spent, I felt like I'd hit the jackpot.
 
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UsandThem

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You have me beat.

I have 3 x 140mm Noctua intake, 1 x 120mm Noctua CPU, and 1 x 140mm Promlitech exhaust.
 

BonzaiDuck

Lifer
Jun 30, 2004
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You have me beat.

I have 3 x 140mm Noctua intake, 1 x 120mm Noctua CPU, and 1 x 140mm Promlitech exhaust.
It's the Stacker 830! One perpetual-Noob I knew absolutely positively had to have the hinged plastic inner side-panel door filled with 4x 140mm and 2x 120's in the front. His system sounded like a DC-3 waiting for take-off, because there was no thermal fan control. I think I could eliminate one side-panel and one front-panel fan with negligible impact on cooling, but my wire-dressing and other preparations are so good, I cannot make myself do it.
 
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VirtualLarry

Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
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I was going to suggest a custom approach (aka, program an arduino or something).

Also, I have some experience running "lower end" hardware, inside a big, spacious ATX case, WITHOUT a fan. No, I don't recommend it. It STILL doesn't cool "enough". You NEED a case fan, period. At least, that's been my experience. Even a lower-speed one. At least, SOMETHING to move air.
 

VirtualLarry

Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
48,105
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However, it is necessary to have the case fans work to remove heat. They don't have to work very much at all if just doing normal desktop stuff. If a person insists to have them all turn off, the heat becomes trapped in the case, raising the temperature, and eventually causing fans to speed up more than they needed to if you had just left them spinning to begin with.
That's my experience as well.
 

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